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Thread: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

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    Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    I wanted to make a good Greek/Turkish Coffee Blends and have been investigating what regions are most commonly used. I have found that Brazillian and columbian beans are fairly common but what else is usually used for such a blend?

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    That would be it... I did a Mixed blend of African, Sumatran and Brazil for a friend and they thought it was too strong (I suspect the acidity from the Africans was what they didnt like... Upon questioning further, it was evident that a Brazil, Central blend is the way for these types if drinks. Low Acid beans....

    I have since played around with a Brazil only in Stovetop and it really cames good - The full bodied mid flavour really works in the Stovetop (provided you dont burn it).

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    I did some research on this some time ago, as I wanted to roast some coffee for a Greek work colleague. From what Id been able to find out on the internet, "traditionally" they seem to have been made from Yemen or Ethiopian coffees, however most that are made commercially these days are usually made from a very low grade Brazil. I did read though that the "better" ones apparently still use a small amount of Ethiopian with the Brazil.

    What level of roast are you going for? I got a reply on HB, from someone that lives in Turkey, and he said that:

    Theres not a specific roast level for Turkish coffee and I believe there shouldnt be. But here in Turkiye roasters generally prefer 2 types of roast.

    a) as soon as first crack starts you stop roasting (and most people claim thats genuine Turkish Coffee)
    b) you keep roasting even after second crack ends which is dark french roast (and they call it double roasted)

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Ive made Turkish with Kimel roasted to 30 seconds into SC.
    Tasted OK to me, and Ive drunk a lot of Turkisk coffee in my time.

    Admittedly I was really trying out the grinder but if the coffee wasnt in the ballpark Id have noticed.

    It could also be that Im used to drinking Turkish made from Bushells out of a jar.
    My fresh Kimel couldnt taste bad compared to that.
    Maybe the preparation technique is a factor in losing any differences youd expect to notice.

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Quote Originally Posted by Thundergod link=1210739645/0#3 date=1210767843
    Ive made Turkish with Kimel roasted to 30 seconds into SC....[snip]...Admittedly I was really trying out the grinder but if the coffee wasnt in the ballpark Id have noticed.

    It could also be that Im used to drinking Turkish made from Bushells out of a jar.
    So, what youre really saying, TG, is that your Kimel tasted like Bushells out of a jar...? ::) Otherwise, you would have noticed...? :o :-[

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Not quite.
    Turkish coffee is an acquired taste or should I say it takes some getting used to.

    Its strong because you boil the heck out of it and concentrate the coffee flavour.
    The grind is very fine and you always end up with sediment in the bottom of your cup.

    I think what Im trying to say is that it doesnt matter too much what coffee you use.
    If you grind it fine enough and boil it to death it all tastes the same.

    When I tried it with the freshly roasted beans I was hoping to tastet how it would have originally (i.e. not out of a jar).
    It didnt taste "better", or really much different.

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Actually, despite my ribbing, Im a big fan of Turkish coffee. However, what Im used to is probably Lebanese rather than Turkish. This is made from pretty dark, probably Brasilian, coffee. However, I have had it made with good quality Yemen, and it really is very good.

    It shouldnt be, given that many people boil it several times. I now follow the practice of not actually boiling, but letting it swell three times, and then stirring it down. A good couple of taps settles most of the grinds at the bottom of the ibrik. It is surprisingly sweet. I am told that you should add sugar for some types of coffee, not sure which ones, but that otherwise its a matter of taste.

    It tastes noticeably better than Bushells when fresh but, being pulverised, doesnt stay that way for long. Absolutely terrific with a pastry or some halva... Yum! Must try the Kimel, if I can get it ground. Do you do this yourself TG?

    matt

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    TG, I think drinking coffee is an acquired taste regardless of the style. This is really the first time Ive heard of "boiling the heck out of it." The grounds would be ashen in colour. Are you sure youre not thinking of how Nescafe is made?

    Matt, your method is how I was taught, and agree, makes a great cuppa!

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Dennis - As Dolcimelo said "many people boil it several times".
    Thats where my "boiling the heck out of it" came from.

    I dont make it that way myself.

    I bring it to the boil only once, then remove it from the heat.


    Dolcimelo - Yes I ground it myself with the Macap.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Dennis's Avatar
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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Quote Originally Posted by Thundergod link=1210739645/0#8 date=1210816798
    Dennis - As Dolcimelo said "many people boil it several times".
    Thats where my "boiling the heck out of it" came from.

    I dont make it that way myself.
    Ah ok, now I understand - would have been very surprised if you did it that way! :)

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Most Turkish coffees Ive consumed have been made for me by one aunt or another.

    My wife makes it very well but we rarely make it at home.

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Quote Originally Posted by Dolcimelo link=1210739645/0#6 date=1210773699
    Actually, despite my ribbing, Im a big fan of Turkish coffee. However, what Im used to is probably Lebanese rather than Turkish. This is made from pretty dark, probably Brasilian, coffee. However, I have had it made with good quality Yemen, and it really is very good.

    It shouldnt be, given that many people boil it several times. I now follow the practice of not actually boiling, but letting it swell three times, and then stirring it down. A good couple of taps settles most of the grinds at the bottom of the ibrik. It is surprisingly sweet. I am told that you should add sugar for some types of coffee, not sure which ones, but that otherwise its a matter of taste.
    matt
    Thats the way my grandmother taught me to make Greek coffee
    Let it bubble up and take off the heat - do it 3 times and serve
    One should note that you dont consume the coffee residue thats used for fortune telling
    This is done by swirling the coffee thats left and turning the cup upside down
    Let this dry and you have a patern of your future only known to those persons that can read it ::)

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    And dont forget, if youre making Lebanese like Dolcimelo, to add the finely ground cardomon with the sugar. Its the critical differentating ingredient, although a bit addictive.

    S

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Hi all

    Several weeks ago I had run out of Bushels Turkish coffee and went to our deli that has all sorts of yummy things that we often buy. He has a quite beefy coffee grinder behind the counter. I asked if he had any Turkish coffee and he asked "whats that"?. I explained that Turkish coffee is really finely ground coffee. He was smiling ... you know when you get that feeling that your being had? I was about to go and he explained that he has "Lebanese coffee" :-) Its NOT Turkish coffee, they were having their coffee that way before the Ottomans invaded :-)

    Mike

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Here is a link on cardamon with reference to coffee
    Its only 3/4 of a page and interesting

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardamom

    KK

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Hi all and sorry for resurrecting an old thread but hoping someone will guide me in the right direction here.
    The other day I received some Ethiopian Harar beans which I roasted for espresso. Without a CS card and going by the picture on the web Id say I got them to about a CS9-10. That was 11mins to FC and 7 mins to SC before pulling them. I pulled a double espresso shot today and that was a great coffee *;D it looks like itll make a great shot in the next few days *8-)

    Today I decided to roast 300gms of these Ethiopian greens to a lighter roast for Turkish coffee. I let it go to FC at about 11mins and then pulled them out after a minute. They look too dark for Turkish style coffee. Lighter than espresso but considerably darker than the Turkish ground we sometimes buy. Its perhaps a CS7-8 on the card. Even though the roast was fresh I ground the beans and made a Turkish coffee but as I suspected it was too dark *:( Does this mean I have to pull them out before FC and go by colour to get that lighter type roast or do I have to use a Brazilian type bean? *:-? Im assuming the majority commercial roasters for Turkish coffee use low grade Brazilian beans for cost reasons rather than anything else but I could be wrong here. Have done some searching on the web but cant seem to find much on it. Any info much appreciated. *:)

    .bill

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Hi Kafeneo

    I read some time ago that you can use any bean type (and found it for you again)
    Here is a Turkish national along with other contributors on the HB forum posting an in depth description

    http://www.home-barista.com/home-roasting/roasting-for-turkish-greek-style-coffee-t6090.html

    KK

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Thanks KK,
    That was the type of info I was looking for ;)

    best regards,
    .bill

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    love it with cardamom as lebanese style. chuck a couple of pods in the pot, adds a nice aroma. might have to try it with fresh coffee rather than preground stuff from gaganis foods...

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Im glad I found this thread (actually found it through a google search) and noticed its still current.

    Ive been wanting to grind my own coffee for Turkish (or Greek as my parents call it). Was wondering if I needed a specific type of bean, how much it should be roasted, etc. *

    From what Ive read above I think Ill just give it a go with my regular espresso blend and see how it turns out.

    Similar to previous posters, I have always been taught to simmer the coffee until it starts to froth, then turn off. *

    Its a very different experience to drinking espresso and I find it hard to drink without a little bit of sugar (added at the start of brewing). *I dont have sugar in any other type of coffee. *Its actually softer/smoother than espresso although I find less complex...perhaps some of the aromatics are killed off during the process.


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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Success... ;D
    On Monday night I roasted a small batch of the Ethiopian Harar to a light roast just on FC. They look like a CS 5. Today I received the Kyocera hand grinder from Mark (au_d2) as per his offer on the other thread here; Thanks Mark. ;)
    http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1240128496

    Well I set this little hand grinder on a tight setting and got a really fine consistent powdery grind for turkish style coffee. Perhaps finer than the bought preground turkish stuff I had in the cupboard 8-) The cup tasted brilliant, better than the preground stuff Ive bought in the past and Im sure this Ethiopian coffee will do well for turkish style. Next roast I think Ill go a bit longer on the roast and pull them off just when FC finishes. A couple of photos to follow. *:)

    .bill





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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    No one here tried any Robusta in there Ibrik?? I have a awesome Ugandan Robusta that lightly roasted goes extremely well in the Ibrik dont even need sugar.

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    "love it with cardamom as lebanese style. chuck a couple of pods in the pot, adds a nice aroma. might have to try it with fresh coffee rather than preground stuff from gaganis foods..."

    Tried the above: Thanks Doug 81 ;D

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    I would be willing to bet that the roast level you are talking about is a cinnamon or maybe a Half-City. Very light indeed. I have only done a few roasts to these levels so I cant really offer any tips on the roast.

    I can however give some tips on the coffees to use. My impression about coffee roasted for Turkish/Arabic/Greek coffee is that the preferred coffees are Ethiopian or Yemens. Really though it should be possible to create a good cup for this gentleman with other coffees. Aim for coffees that you enjoy in a lighter roast.

    I would also assume that this gentleman will be adding sugar and spices to the coffee. You should ask him what spices he would normally use in the coffee. This might help you choose a coffee that will pair well with them.

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    I would like to share some tips here..Boil the water before adding your grounds. Remove the pot from the heat before you add your grounds. The water/coffee will foam when you add the coffee.. you want to keep this process going on as long as possible without foaming over and out of the pot. To do this raise and lower the pot, not the heat you are using. The rest is practice. Thanks! :)

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    Re: Greek and Turkish Coffee Blends

    Quote Originally Posted by 1B393030333315393030560 link=1210739645/24#24 date=1332159183
    I would like to share some tips here..Boil the water before adding your grounds. Remove the pot from the heat before you add your grounds. The water/coffee will foam when you add the coffee.. you want to keep this process going on as long as possible without foaming over and out of the pot. To do this raise and lower the pot, not the heat you are using. The rest is practice. Thanks! :)
    I disagree with the above method in the quote

    For the past 45 years this is the method passed down to me by my grandmother


    Basic Recipe & making directions
    1 per person X raised teaspoon of Greek/Turkish coffee
    Measure water in the demitasse cups you will be drinking from and add one full cup per teaspoon of coffee

    Sugar can be added to the brew or used afterwards
    If you want to add it now to brew add 1 teaspoon per person

    Stir well and briskly as this may be one of the few times you will stir

    Place on heat and bring it up to " almost boil" and you can swirl not stir the liquid if required
    You will see the crema almost boiling over so you need to pre-empt the rise and raise the Briki from the heat
    Once the crema falls back down - place the Briki on the heat again
    Repeat again bring to boil and raise off the heat

    Pour the brewed coffee immediately in the demitasse cups a little in each going back and forth until the crema and devide it equally in each cup

    Leave to settle and cool for a minute or so

    Drink only the top thin liquid and leave the grinds that have settled in the cup

    Regards
    KK

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    Senior Member NakiChap's Avatar
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    I have been having a bit of a play with Turkish brew method over the last couple of days and I do like the results,
    I wasn't sure what to expect in the cup as I have never tasted a Turkish brewed coffee before and I was pleasantly surprised,
    I brewed in my little Birko food heater which worked ok,
    Nice strong smooth sweet cup .

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    I love Sumatran Mandehling dark roasted. Minas and Mocha Harare blend works very well, too - gives a divine aroma.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Koffee_Kosmo View Post
    I disagree with the above method in the quote

    For the past 45 years this is the method passed down to me by my grandmother


    Basic Recipe & making directions
    1 per person X raised teaspoon of Greek/Turkish coffee
    Measure water in the demitasse cups you will be drinking from and add one full cup per teaspoon of coffee

    Sugar can be added to the brew or used afterwards
    If you want to add it now to brew add 1 teaspoon per person

    Stir well and briskly as this may be one of the few times you will stir

    Place on heat and bring it up to " almost boil" and you can swirl not stir the liquid if required
    You will see the crema almost boiling over so you need to pre-empt the rise and raise the Briki from the heat
    Once the crema falls back down - place the Briki on the heat again
    Repeat again bring to boil and raise off the heat

    Pour the brewed coffee immediately in the demitasse cups a little in each going back and forth until the crema and devide it equally in each cup

    Leave to settle and cool for a minute or so

    Drink only the top thin liquid and leave the grinds that have settled in the cup

    Regards
    KK


    Tried this Turkish coffee by Bushells. The directions say 1 cup, but even though I have doubled, tripled or quadrupled the amount of coffee, after boiling it seems rather weak, like diluted coffee. Is it supposed to taste like that, or am I doing it wrong. I presume the 1 "cup" is the equivalent of about 250ml? Can all the experts here advise?

    The method shared by KK above is quite close (although goes into more detail) the one off the jar from Bushells -

    errrrr..... how does one attach a photo here?

    Sorry, newbie.

    thank you.

  30. #30
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kofinsuch View Post
    Tried this Turkish coffee by Bushells. The directions say 1 cup, but even though I have doubled, tripled or quadrupled the amount of coffee, after boiling it seems rather weak, like diluted coffee. Is it supposed to taste like that, or am I doing it wrong. I presume the 1 "cup" is the equivalent of about 250ml? Can all the experts here advise?

    The method shared by KK above is quite close (although goes into more detail) the one off the jar from Bushells -

    errrrr..... how does one attach a photo here?

    Sorry, newbie.

    thank you.
    Morning Kofinsuch, welcome to Coffee Snobs.

    Turkish coffee is served in a demitasse cup approx 60 to 90 ml, not a 250 ml coffee cup, try reducing the amount of water appropriately and the strength should be more to your liking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Morning Kofinsuch, welcome to Coffee Snobs.

    Turkish coffee is served in a demitasse cup approx 60 to 90 ml, not a 250 ml coffee cup, try reducing the amount of water appropriately and the strength should be more to your liking.

    Thank you Yelta. The insrtuctions on the jar just said 1 cup, so I just assumed.......hahaha. I shall try 90, and then 60ml later today. Thank you.

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    Greek coffee (also called Ellinikos cafes) is similar to Turkish coffee, in that they're both made on a stovetop using unfiltered coffee grounds. This type of coffee might also be called Arabic, Cypriot, Armenian, or Bosnian coffee, but there are slight differences in the method depending on the country. Greek coffee is thick, foamy, and made with coffee beans that have been ground to a powder. Unlike American coffee, Greek coffee is meant to be sipped and enjoyed over many hours.

  33. #33
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    Hmmm...

    Interesting...
    How to Make Greek Coffee: 12 Steps - wikiHow
    Plagiarism anyone...

    Mal.
    DesigningByCoffee likes this.

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