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Thread: Coffee Blending.

  1. #1
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    Coffee Blending.

    When blending coffee, do you blend before roasting or after roasting ?​

  2. #2
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    G'day mate...

    Either. If the beans in the blend are going to use similar individual profiles, then pre-blending works out very well. On the other hand, if various beans in the blend require quite divergent profiles to get the best out of them, then post-blending is the ideal way to go...

    Mal.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phwoolf View Post
    When blending coffee, do you blend before roasting or after roasting ?​
    Mostly after roasting as I use a Behmor and I don't think it really suits preblending like other roasters. In saying that I've done a few preblended roasts where I knew the two origins would respond in a similar way to the profile I used. Both are viable methods IMO but blending after roasting gives you a few more options.
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  4. #4
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    Many thanks guys. As I am new to the blending scene and am using a Behmor, initially, I will do my blending after roasting each bean separately. Once I have gained a lot more experience with various beans and their profiles I will try blending before roasting.
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  5. #5
    Member Kafine's Avatar
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    I use a Behmor and blend prior to roasting. I have had some great successes and very few failures. I don't experiment as much as some but I still think it is great.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member trentski's Avatar
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    I use the kjm blend or variants of it in a kkto. Most always pre blend unless I'm over capacity in the amount I want to roast

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    Either. If the beans in the blend are going to use similar individual profiles, then pre-blending works out very well. On the other hand, if various beans in the blend require quite divergent profiles to get the best out of them, then post-blending is the ideal way to go....
    +1. Just what I was going to write. Spot on Mal.
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  8. #8
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    Coffee Blending is necessary for espresso since a single coffee origin will lack the complexity desired. It is important to remember that the advantage of espresso over other brewing methods is a result of the formation of the crema. Without the cream the espresso would be strong, thick coffee. The crema is an emulsified layer of tiny, smooth bubbles that trap aromatic compounds. This layer coats the tongue and these small bubbles break over time allowing espresso to be enjoyed long after it has been consumed. An aromatic coffee, therefore, is essential to a well-prepared espresso blend.

  9. #9
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by laura541 View Post
    Coffee Blending is necessary for espresso since a single coffee origin will lack the complexity desired. It is important to remember that the advantage of espresso over other brewing methods is a result of the formation of the crema. Without the cream the espresso would be strong, thick coffee. The crema is an emulsified layer of tiny, smooth bubbles that trap aromatic compounds. This layer coats the tongue and these small bubbles break over time allowing espresso to be enjoyed long after it has been consumed. An aromatic coffee, therefore, is essential to a well-prepared espresso blend.
    Do you mean espresso based milk drinks? I partly agree with this, but if you mean espresso in general I totally disagree. I'm doing a lot less blending than I used to because the coffees I'm getting are so good and make fantastic single origin espressos. You're right that sometimes they don't have enough 'oomph' to make a decent milk drink, but it's rare that they don't make a good espresso as long as I've done a good job of roasting them.

  10. #10
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Not worth responding to the above thread Leroy...

    It's just straight out plagiarised material pinched from a website, not even an attempt at attribution or any commentary by the poster...

    Here...
    EspressoBlending.JPG

    And here...
    EspressoBlending-2.JPG

    Mal.
    Last edited by Dimal; 27th October 2016 at 10:05 PM.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Logga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    Not worth responding to the above thread Leroy...

    It's just straight out plagiarised material pinched from a website, not even an attempt at attribution or any commentary by the poster...

    Here...
    EspressoBlending.JPG

    And here...
    EspressoBlending-2.JPG

    Mal.
    Good detective work Mal. Yep some people try to look but end up looking .
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  12. #12
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    Not worth responding to the above thread Leroy...

    It's just straight out plagiarised material pinched from a website, not even an attempt at attribution or any commentary by the poster...

    Here...
    EspressoBlending.JPG

    And here...
    EspressoBlending-2.JPG

    Mal.
    I did wonder Mal, but I thought I'd respond and see what came back. Spambot? Troll? Maybe mods should just delete the post. Well spotted mate.
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  13. #13
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Good catch - did sound a little odd. And is not even true!
    Don't tell my Gambella … or Yirg … or Harrar … or Sulawesi Blue it doesn't make good espresso - you'll hurts their feelings!
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  14. #14
    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    I did wonder Mal, but I thought I'd respond and see what came back. Spambot? Troll? Maybe mods should just delete the post. Well spotted mate.
    Unless they become a problem it's more fun to watch them get called out.


    Java "Troll what?" phile
    Toys! I must have new toys!!!

  15. #15
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Javaphile View Post
    Unless they become a problem it's more fun to watch them get called out.


    Java "Troll what?" phile
    Haha! Good call Java.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by laura541 View Post
    Coffee Blending is necessary for espresso since a single coffee origin will lack the complexity desired. It is important to remember that the advantage of espresso over other brewing methods is a result of the formation of the crema. Without the cream the espresso would be strong, thick coffee. The crema is an emulsified layer of tiny, smooth bubbles that trap aromatic compounds. This layer coats the tongue and these small bubbles break over time allowing espresso to be enjoyed long after it has been consumed. An aromatic coffee, therefore, is essential to a well-prepared espresso blend.
    I'll never drink coffee again.
    It sounds horrible.
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  17. #17
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    It all depends on the objective of the coffee, some like a fruity and bright espresso, some like a dark and rich espresso. Blends all come down to what they are being used for really. All blends are not created equal also, some "seasonal blends" may run much higher scored coffees in a light roast, where other blends may be loaded with cheaper coffees and roasted dark for cheaper cafe markets. So in short, saying that blends = this flavour and singles = this flavour is just a broad generalization.

  18. #18
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    I don't think it really suits preblending like other roasters. As I am new to the blending scene and am using a Behmor.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by garypope View Post
    I don't think it really suits preblending like other roasters. As I am new to the blending scene and am using a Behmor.
    At the risk of sounding like Faith No More, what is 'it'? I don't quite get the link between the first and second sentence? Are you saying that the pre-blending doesn't suit the Behmor? I guess that's sort of the case where one of the component beans is small and tends to get stuck in the wire and burn, but for 'regular' blends I don't find pre-blending a problem.
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  20. #20
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    I pre-blended the vast majority of the roasts I did with my Behmor and it was never an issue...

    Mal.
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  21. #21
    Site Sponsor K_Bean_Coffee's Avatar
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    I usually post blend but occasionally pre-blend. Pre-blending of fine as long at the first and second crack times are reasonably close.
    I'm happy with my roasts every week. I don't roast consistently but variety is the spice of life. Variety and even occasional "surprises" and ah ha moments are what makes roasting such a great hobby.
    Cheers, Paul

  22. #22
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    I'm using a Behmor and I typically blend after roasting. If I have small amounts of various beans left over at the end of the bag, then I mix them together and experiment with the profile. I've had no failures.

  23. #23
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    Blend before roasting.

  24. #24
    Brenton
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    Roasted a 50/50 in the Behmor a few days ago. Elephant and the Sulawesi Blue. Rested 5 days and the first cup literally stopped me in my tracks and made me swoon I had a laugh . This is why I love roasting at home. NO coffee from ANY cafe etc has done that for me.
    greenman likes this.

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