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Thread: Sweet beans

  1. #1
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    Sweet beans

    What are the sweetest beans in the current bean bay and what sort of ratio for blending with Peru Seja de Selva?

  2. #2
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    G'day mate...

    Any of the better Central American beans are usually very sweet and fruity, such as this one...
    CoffeeSnobs - BeanBay - Green Coffee - Guatemala Jacaltenango SHB

    Want to be quick though, not much left...

    Mal.

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    Thanks Mal.
    ... and vlending ratio with Peru Seja?

  4. #4
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    I'd suggest roasting up a batch of each, then experiment with blending ratios afterwards...
    Best way to discover what your preference will be.

    Mal.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member readeral's Avatar
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    Also slow your roast a little after the beans have yellowed to make the most of that sweetness
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    Thanks both, will do...
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    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    ...add The Indian Elephant Hills AA to that list too, very sweet and holds it longer through a range of roast depths.
    CoffeeSnobs - BeanBay - Green Coffee - India Elephant Hills AA Grade

    ...but remember, if you take any coffee too dark it will have less sweetness as most of the colour in a roasted bean is the sugars darkening. Think back to school fete toffee:

    * the light coloured ones were sugar sweet with no real flavour difference to straight sugar.
    * the medium brown ones were more neutral, gave caramel flavours with a balance of sweetness and bitterness.
    * and the dark ones were nearly bitter with nearly no sweetness and a toasty finish.

    Toffee is pretty much 100% sugar, heated to different "roast depths" and is a great way to understand what happens to sugars in the bean during the coffee roasting process.

    You can recreate the school fete toffees easily enough as a roasted sugar tasting plate. Add a cup of white sugar to a small saucepan, add just enough water to dissolve it then heat (bubble and boil) and stir. As the color changes, take a teaspoon sized sample at different "roast depths" and drop it on a dinner plate, keep boiling and continue to drop spoonful amounts through the range of colours. Let cool (because boiled sugar is REALLY hot) and taste the differences.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    ...add The Indian Elephant Hills AA to that list too, very sweet and holds it longer through a range of roast depths.
    Thanks Andy!

  9. #9
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Great analogy Andy! Never thought of it like that before.
    Sounds just like the perfect roast depth analogy to me (except that under-roasted beans don't taste sweet like sugar … more like plywood!)
    Guess you can always take an analogy too far

  10. #10
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    ...sour plywood at that.

    The "sours" in coffee cook off at about the same time that the sugars start to caramalise so the toffee experiment works from the colour change part of the coffee roasting process.

    Onions on the BBQ are similar too but less palatable to experiment with. Still fun though, so next BBQ you have try removing onion rings off the hotplate at different "roast depths" to see the sugar flavours appear, increase, concentrate then disappear as you introduce more char flavours at the end of the process.

    Simple tricks that make you a better roaster and open-up your palate to better sweetness perceptions/gradients.
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  11. #11
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Unfortunately, at the school fete, I was too concerned with making sure I got my Ace Frehley face make-up put on to worry about the toffee. The onion example, however, I try out quite regularly when trying to work out the best caramelised onion recipe for whatever it is that I'm cookin.
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by readeral View Post
    Also slow your roast a little after the beans have yellowed to make the most of that sweetness
    This is excellent advice! I used this approach in a roast with the Indian Elephant Hills AA recently. Had been chasing a level of sweetness but not quite getting there, however by using this methodology I have nailed the profile I was looking for - thank you!
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  13. #13
    Senior Member readeral's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by solace View Post
    This is excellent advice! I used this approach in a roast with the Indian Elephant Hills AA recently. Had been chasing a level of sweetness but not quite getting there, however by using this methodology I have nailed the profile I was looking for - thank you!
    Happy to be the messenger, but I learned it from Dimal and DesigningByCoffee !! Enjoy your Elephant Hills roast
    DesigningByCoffee and Dimal like this.

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