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Thread: Equal Parts Blend

  1. #1
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    Equal Parts Blend

    Ok.....I'm lazy! I love the KJM blend when you get it right but you end up with left over beans because of the different proportions in the blend. What beans from the beanbay would make a good blend with equal proportions? I drink black at work from the aeropress but flat whites at home. I'd rather a blend that goes well with milk as I don't mind any coffee in the aeropress.

    Thanks in advance
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  2. #2
    Senior Member coffeechris's Avatar
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    I would go for something like the Aceh Danau Laut Tawar with a range of Ethiopians which are available or as always the Yemen. Its a Mocha Java type blend. Will go well in milk but will also work as a short or long black IMO


  3. #3
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    Are you saying drink the yemen by itself? I'd be afraid to blend it at $35kg! I used to do 50:50 ethiopia/peru or brazil. Always loved PNG wahgi by itself but i prefer the bigger flavours of a blend now.

  4. #4
    Senior Member coffeechris's Avatar
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    Sorry i Should be more clear. I would use the Yemen as 50% with the Aceh Danau Laut Tawar. I say the Ethiopia coffees as they are a decent substitute for the Yemen at a lower price.

  5. #5
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    I roasted 1kg batch of Kenya AAA Bold 50/50 with Honduras 45 seconds past first crack for Clever dripper brews while touring NZ, our early morning brews have been most enjoyable with good acidity, nice body, clean full flavour.

  6. #6
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Equal parts of Ethiopian, Indonesian and Brazilian has long been one of my staples. Ideally you would roast the Brazilian separately as it requires a different roast profile but I have had excellent results from a pre-blend.
    Of course, there is the trusty old Mocha-Java of equal parts Ethiopian (or Yemen) and Indo.
    I wouldn't worry too much about leftovers. Many of us end up have roasted a bag-end blend. Sometimes you get a nice surprise.

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    Thanks guys some good tips there.

  8. #8
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    The problem with blending is that you really need all the ingredients to have the same or at least very similar solubility. The lower the proportion of a particular bean the less it matters, but even at <20% of the total if one ingredient has a vastly different level of solubility it'll end up grossly under or over extracted and won't taste good. Without measuring equipment like a refractometer you'll never know, so for us home roasters it's just a matter of trial and error. Stick to some of the general rules (such as darker roasts have higher solubility) and try not to use more than 3 ingredients. I've found that I'm blending less often, but when I do it's with just 2 or 3 coffees using simple ratios like - 50/50, 60/40, 40/30/30, 50/25/25 etc.
    I'm able to get some really good quality Brazilian coffee here in NZ and I still find they make an excellent blend component that I then add a bit of brightness too with a Central American or a Kenyan or something. Something I found recently was a Red Bourbon from Guatemala. Unlike the usual Caturras and Typicas you get from Guatemala the Red Bourbon had a bit more punch. I could roast it fairly light for a nice SO espresso or plunger coffee, but with a bit more development post first crack it was awesome with milk, either on its own or as the base for a blend. So keep a look out for these sort of coffees I reckon as they're quite versatile and well worth a try.
    Whatever you go with you'll just have to try a few things and as always let your taste buds make the final decision. Have fun.

  9. #9
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    Nice experiential write-up there mate and excellent advice...

    Mal.

  10. #10
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    Good advice Leroy. It's funny because I'm drinking a columbian at the moment by itself... One thing I have to remember to do is to let it develop. First few days blaaa.... now it's starting to develop and i'm enjoying it. You're right at just finding some favorite beans. I always order Peru. Blending without specific knowledge I try for a south american for body and african to lift it to another level. I'm not clever enough to tell the difference between a 50/50 blend and 60/40 I don't think. Either way i'll enjoy it!

  11. #11
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    one staple i love is 50:50 peru cevu & ethiopian yirgacheffe. Can substitute the ethopian with other ones.

    Also if you want to spice it up, bring the ratios down to 1/3rds and add an indonesian
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  12. #12
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    50/50 blend of Indian Monsoon and either an Ethiopian or Brazilian always seem to fill me with happiness. (Each roasted separately then blended).
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  13. #13
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Have been roasting this 3 bean pre-blended, equal parts Peru Ceja de Selva, Sulawesi Blue and Ethiopian Gambella Sundried, taken to just on first snaps of second crack it produces rich chocolate/cocoa with fruity notes, rich body and lingering aftertaste. I initially roasted this for a Xmas blend but now I call it my Fruit Cake Blend!!!
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  14. #14
    Senior Member Gavisconi007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenman View Post
    Have been roasting this 3 bean pre-blended, equal parts Peru Ceja de Selva, Sulawesi Blue and Ethiopian Gambella Sundried, taken to just on first snaps of second crack it produces rich chocolate/cocoa with fruity notes, rich body and lingering aftertaste. I initially roasted this for a Xmas blend but now I call it my Fruit Cake Blend!!!

    Great combination. I'm going to try that myself. The Gambella will add some real depth of character to the other two (which are already great SOs in their own right). Any recommendation on post roast resting time GM?
    oliverm and R2bean2 like this.

  15. #15
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    I generally rest them for 5-7 days depending on the state of bean supply at coffee central!!!
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenman View Post
    I generally rest them for 5-7 days depending on the state of bean supply at coffee central!!!
    Thats always my plan too but usually the roasting happens when i'm about to run out.......

  17. #17
    Senior Member Gavisconi007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin_Boyle View Post
    Thats always my plan too but usually the roasting happens when i'm about to run out.......

    A general rule of thumb which seems to work well for me at least is to head out for a roasting session when I'm down to 1kg of roasted beans

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gavisconi007 View Post
    A general rule of thumb which seems to work well for me at least is to head out for a roasting session when I'm down to 1kg of roasted beans
    I had a laugh..... I know exactly when I should be roasting again but that isn't when I actually roast. I should have been roasting last night after work but didn't get around to it. For me it would be the 500g mark.

  19. #19
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    For the last few months I have been blending equal parts Indian Elephant Hills AA with either the Peru or Costa Rica, pre-blended and roasted to CS8. I mostly drink double ristretto's and the odd latte. These blends seem to hold up exceptionally well in milk with mild acidity, generous fruity tones, and delicate caramel sweetness.
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  20. #20
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Enjoying a 50/50 blend taken just prior to the commencement of second crack, Sulawesi Blue and Ethiopian Ghimbi--Mocha Java style--7 days post roast now and tasting a treat as espresso and long black and super tasty in milk producing rich creamy chocolate notes.
    DesigningByCoffee likes this.

  21. #21
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    I'll report one that didn't work: 50/50 Costa Rica Geisha/Ethiopian Sidamo.

    I wanted to make the Geisha fruitier but all I got was a watered down Sidamo; the Geisha is just too delicate for these experiments. Might give it another try with 10% Sidamo. Expensive experiments...

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