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Thread: Ethiopian Gambella Sundried - Crunch

  1. #1
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    Ethiopian Gambella Sundried - Crunch

    I got this from CS several weeks ago as a green bean which I roast.

    The appearance of the bean is one of considerable variance in size with black looking beans in amongst them.

    Flavour wise it is fine.

    My question is anyone else getting crunching noises from their grinders with this bean? I don't think it is stones as these would sink to the bottom of the bag and there is no indication of stones I can see.

    The crunching noises are only occasional, a hard bean or some bit of foreign matter maybe.

    It is one of the only beans I have got from CS ever that I really have a quality question mark over it.

    Any comments?

  2. #2
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    Hopefully it was just the odd hard bean or extra crunchy bit. I can't say I've heard what a stone being ground sounds like - hope to never find out!
    However, I've personally found Gambella Sundried to be the biggest contributor (by a large stretch) to my rock collection.
    Here's a cross selection of what I've found in my post roast de-stone routine over the last 6 months or so of home roasting - most from Gambella...
    IMG_2507.jpg

    (PS - I didn't find the 5 cents - that's there for scale.)

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcf1978 View Post
    Hopefully it was just the odd hard bean or extra crunchy bit. I can't say I've heard what a stone being ground sounds like - hope to never find out!
    However, I've personally found Gambella Sundried to be the biggest contributor (by a large stretch) to my rock collection.
    Here's a cross selection of what I've found in my post roast de-stone routine over the last 6 months or so of home roasting - most from Gambella...
    IMG_2507.jpg

    (PS - I didn't find the 5 cents - that's there for scale.)
    The drying area for the beans must be right next to the stoning pit, my guess...

  4. #4
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Stones are common enough and especially in a dry process bean, or any bean that is patio dried. The crunchy sounds you refer to are stones which you should be removing post roast and prior to grinding as enough of them won't be doing your burrs any good. Most stones found in coffee are pretty soft but occasionally a piece of quartz may show up, even steel and other metal fragments. Coffee is an agricultural product and we should always expect a level of contamination or defect, sometimes it's a case of the higher the price the lower the level but no-one can guarantee it; the CS bags carry a disclaimer re material other than coffee. The Gambella Sundried is a really good coffee and in some years has been a great coffee and a few stones doesn't detract from it's quality, calling it a problem is a first world issue.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by chokkidog View Post
    Stones are common enough and especially in a dry process bean, or any bean that is patio dried. The crunchy sounds you refer to are stones which you should be removing post roast and prior to grinding as enough of them won't be doing your burrs any good. Most stones found in coffee are pretty soft but occasionally a piece of quartz may show up, even steel and other metal fragments. Coffee is an agricultural product and we should always expect a level of contamination or defect, sometimes it's a case of the higher the price the lower the level but no-one can guarantee it; the CS bags carry a disclaimer re material other than coffee. The Gambella Sundried is a really good coffee and in some years has been a great coffee and a few stones doesn't detract from it's quality, calling it a problem is a first world issue.
    It is the first time I can recall getting stones. It may be I avoided this type of sun dried coffee before. It is weirs stuff even black deformed thalidomide beans and different twisted shapes. Nothing wrong with the flavour though

  6. #6
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Had the misfortune of a stone sneaking through and into my Mazzer Mini several years ago, the sound was excruciating!! Over time I have found small stones and even some corn kernels in batches of mainly naturals, I always check the greens post roast and then in the cooler for any nasties!

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    Quote Originally Posted by greenman View Post
    Had the misfortune of a stone sneaking through and into my Mazzer Mini several years ago, the sound was excruciating!! Over time I have found small stones and even some corn kernels in batches of mainly naturals, I always check the greens post roast and then in the cooler for any nasties!
    I found one suspect piece. It was heavier than water and solid but with a coating. I think it is some sort of vegetable matter. It might be what is making the noise in the grinder.

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    I smashed the object with a hammer. It looks like an old dead coffee bean. This coffee is possibly just not a clean well prepared product. The product contains beans that are black and shrivelled as well. Fortunately it tastes good in the cup.

    Kenyan AA is a different coffee but is immaculately prepared.

  9. #9
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    I've never worried too much about what the beans look like, especially with all of the dry-processed/natural processed coffee.
    Always relied on Andy's descriptions and then the results in the cup. Never been steered wrong yet...

    Mal.
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  10. #10
    Senior Member GrahamK's Avatar
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    Hence the need for de-stoners when selling to the public.

    Stones do not necessarily sink to the bottom of a bag, and not all will be stones. Some can be quite light and crunchy.

    Also not necessarily an indication of dodgy quality, just a fact of roasting life.

    GrahamK
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    I always check a batch before roasting , watch the roast itself, then have a good look after.

    I find as the colour changes lighter coloured stones become visible , while a dark stone is visible in the pre roast check.

  12. #12
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wattgn View Post
    I smashed the object with a hammer. It looks like an old dead coffee bean. This coffee is possibly just not a clean well prepared product. The product contains beans that are black and shrivelled as well. Fortunately it tastes good in the cup.

    Kenyan AA is a different coffee but is immaculately prepared.
    No, it's not a matter of quality per se, it's more the difference between washed (Kenyan) and dry processed beans (Gambella). there will always be a tendency towards the feral with dry process, but this is what makes it unique and sometimes outstanding. My favourite all time coffee was a feral dry process coffee from Yemen, back in 2010/11.... the Bani Ismail, it was hard to drink as drinking coffee whilst smiling involuntarily is difficult at the best of times.
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  13. #13
    Senior Member GrahamK's Avatar
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    Totally agree with CD regarding the Yemen Bani Ismail, real dodgy looking beans and quite tiny some of them, but still my favourite to date as well.

    GrahamK
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  14. #14
    Senior Member readeral's Avatar
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    Fwiw, I roasted some of this up before Christmas and wasn't all that impressed. I subsequently spent a few hours cleaning up my greens, pulling out the sour, black, badly berry borered beans etc. (incl. 10 or so stones in the 2.5kg, and some metallic object) it improved the taste and ease of roast significantly. Others may disagree, but I pulled out 10% obviously defective beans, so it had a significant impact. Much more delicious and clean afterwards. I've saved the remaining 2.5kg I left unsorted for seasoning my (one day to arrive) Aillio, and sought some other Ethiopian, happy to pay that 10% more to avoid needing to sort on my own.

  15. #15
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Sorting is a bit harder on 10kg batches......something you wouldn't ordinarily do but for a home roaster, why not? The other x factor with any bean is, of course, the roast. There is many a step betwixt the cherry ripening on the tree and putting the coffee to one's lips as a brew; nailing a roast is just as important as any of the other processes and can render a bean delicious, average or awful.
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    I don't personally sort but if you do it post roast all you'd need to do is put your roast in a bucket and shake it a while. The heavy items will fall to the bottom. Scoop the coffee off the top and eventually you will have a small layer on the bottom where you could quite quickly sort through carefully to take foreign matter out. Anything foreign that doesn't sink to the bottom will likely be light weight and not dense/hard enough to be a problem to your grinder.
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  17. #17
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    A small grading screen works well for this.
    Use it in a similar way that a prospector might do, except gold nuggets might be hard to find...

    Mal.

  18. #18
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    I use one of these from Bunnings for my cooling tray, which is great for the small stuff as the holes are a little larger than a mesh colander. Then my de-stoner works for the larger

  19. #19
    Senior Member trentski's Avatar
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    Picked out a stone post roast in my last batch. Only my second in 4. or 5 years of roasting. Grinder found my first one and I found this one when bagging.

  20. #20
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    This bean has dead old rotten beans mixed in with the good stuff. I haven't found any rocks but these old beans make a noticeable crunch when they go through. So far it hasn't done any damage but I will probably get some Kenya AA next time.
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  21. #21
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    I have been using Gambella in my blends for years, the odd nasty is by far outweighed by the intensity of flavours it adds in the cup, for the price they are little gems!!!

  22. #22
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Must admit - I love the gambella but have found this years batch a little rough … guess that's the price you pay for a natural product!
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  23. #23
    Senior Member Arcade's Avatar
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    Coming in late I realise but may help others. I must be the unlucky one but I get at least 1 stone per 2.5kg bag, if not more. I always sift through the green beans as I add them to my canister, prior to roasting. They're easy to spot and it doesn't slow me down too much.

    I only discovered it after it jammed up my Vario. Luckily being a belt-drive and with a plastic spur gear, it just chewed the belt. Easy replacement and the burrs were fine.

    Still my favourite SO to date.

  24. #24
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Ah wow, yeah I've never once found a stone.. only thing I've found is some threads from the bag the greenies come in. Sometimes I spot them preroast, other times they have fun in the roaster XD

  25. #25
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    I just don't buy it any more. Why punish an innocent grinder?

  26. #26
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    I've bought Ethiopian Gambella in the past and will buy it again, certainly ticks my boxes.

    I don't find sorting through 725 grams of green beans once a week an onerous task, takes me all of a couple of minutes. I check my greens just prior to roasting, in 10 years I've found a few stones, no big deal, people seem to get a bit precious about this type of thing, it's a natural product, as such there is always the off chance of a surprise, when it comes to roasting coffee, vigilance and attention to detail is imperative, this applies from weighing out the greens right through to cooling and bagging, if your not a stickler for detail you WILL have problems.

    As far as the Gambella is concerned have a read through this thread http://coffeesnobs.com.au/cup-tastin...undried-2.html
    it goes back quite a way, not many negative comments there.

    As a last comment @ $11 kg it's a bloody bargain.
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