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Thread: Izzo Alex Leva

  1. #551
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    The 'correct' number isn't all that important and not really possible. It depends on a lot of factors..like the accuracy of the pressure gauge (likely not precision/lab grade), calibration of the temp probe (similar story to the gauge, likely not calibrated), PID offset and sea level. In the end, as long as it's reading consistently that's all you need.

    For the expected number (based on physics), you can check this out:
    http://www.tlv.com/global/TI/calcula...mperature.html

    For instance, at 120C it should be 1.986 bar (absolute) minus your atmospheric pressure = roughly 0.97 bar (on gauge).
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  2. #552
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    Hi,
    I have no idea what my pressure gauge says. I doesn't affect how i make coffee. I just adjust the temp up or down depending on type of beans and then alter according to taste
    Cheers
    Dave
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  3. #553
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    Quote Originally Posted by samuellaw178 View Post
    The 'correct' number isn't all that important and not really possible. It depends on a lot of factors..like the accuracy of the pressure gauge (likely not precision/lab grade), calibration of the temp probe (similar story to the gauge, likely not calibrated), PID offset and sea level. In the end, as long as it's reading consistently that's all you need.

    For the expected number (based on physics), you can check this out:
    Calculator: Saturated Steam Table by Temperature | TLV - A Steam Specialist Company (International)

    For instance, at 120C it should be 1.986 bar (absolute) minus your atmospheric pressure = roughly 0.97 bar (on gauge).
    Great stuff Samual, I'm glad there are folks like you out there that are all over this stuff, it does my head in frankly.

    I simply look at a guide and make sure I'm close enough to it but my baby may be a little further away from optimum with a 0.15 (120 @ 0.85) difference, are you saying it's not enough to worry about as it's consistently read the same which it does?

    I just compare that difference to a timing chain on the engine of a car, if the time is out, it's out and the engine is sluggish with obvious results. And being the perfectionist that I try to be I'm just wondering if I'm missing out on the optimum pour.

  4. #554
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr_Dave View Post
    Hi,
    I have no idea what my pressure gauge says. I doesn't affect how i make coffee. I just adjust the temp up or down depending on type of beans and then alter according to taste
    Cheers
    Dave
    Totally agree.

    It's the "but what if" that playing on my mind.

    What if the bar was at optimum level and at your preferred temp, and improves taste?

    Maybe I'm drawing an "unscientific" long bow.......always on the quest for improving status quo

  5. #555
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardC View Post
    Great stuff Samual, I'm glad there are folks like you out there that are all over this stuff, it does my head in frankly.

    I simply look at a guide and make sure I'm close enough to it but my baby may be a little further away from optimum with a 0.15 (120 @ 0.85) difference, are you saying it's not enough to worry about as it's consistently read the same which it does?

    I just compare that difference to a timing chain on the engine of a car, if the time is out, it's out and the engine is sluggish with obvious results. And being the perfectionist that I try to be I'm just wondering if I'm missing out on the optimum pour.
    Glad it helps Richard. Rest assured your machine is fine. Any discrepancy will come from either (i) gauge measurement error (ii) temp probe measurement error (iii) temp probe placement error. It's a measurement error and not a performance indicator.

    As DrDave has said, just adjust the temp based on taste. Your real 'optimal' pressure/temp will likely be the same as another Snob (if you guys are using same bean same roast etc with the same taste preference) even if your gauges don't read the same.
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  6. #556
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    Got it Samual, thanks again for breaking it down for me

  7. #557
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlMac View Post
    If anyone can find the tool needed to take the cap of the piston let me know. I am starting to think it doesn't even exist, except at the factory where they are put together.
    I found it - it's called a Budd Nut Socket.
    Now trying to buy one in the right size with the correct size pins and configuration.
    Have to take the piston in to a specialist tool shop.

    Got lucky. A tool guru looked at my photo of it and knew what it was.

  8. #558
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    Thanks Al,
    I'd appreciate you letting me know when you find it as I would buy one also
    Cheers
    Dave

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    I was going to a tool shop to have one manufactured. But, if there is one somewhere, I would like to buy one too.

  10. #560
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hack View Post
    I was going to a tool shop to have one manufactured. But, if there is one somewhere, I would like to buy one too.
    Will let you know how I get on.
    Should get a chance to take the piston out of the machine and into the tool shop in the next couple of days.
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  11. #561
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlMac View Post
    Will let you know how I get on.
    Should get a chance to take the piston out of the machine and into the tool shop in the next couple of days.
    Another dead end.
    The smallest diameter the tool shop could get in was bigger than the piston diameter.

    I did learn that the four small notches in the piston head are 6mm across.

    While a pin spanner will work well when the piston is out of the Lever Group Body, it won't help you reassemble the piston inside the Lever Group Body.
    This is important because when you put in a new gasket you cant slide it back down from the top of the Lever Group Body - it flares out from top to bottom.

    I ended up using two 6mm allen key heads, inserted them into two of the buds, placed a large screwdriver horizontally between them, held it all together with my hands and screwed the piston head down until it was below the shower screen line.
    Not ideal. Not keen to repeat it.

    To work on the group I think you need, as a minimum:
    1. wrench and allen key to remove the bolts holding the Lever Group Body together;
    2. wrench to remove the bolts holding the Lever Group Body onto the main body;
    3. 90 degree bent nose pliers to remove shower screen C/lock ring. Don't skimp. Get the right size nose on your pliers. This lock ring takes some serious pressure to remove;
    4. Vice to hold the Lever Group Body while working on it and a thick rag to protect your beautiful chrome surfaces;
    5. some kind of tool to take the piston head off and then get it back on when installed back into the Lever Group Body;
    6. rubber mallet to very very gently tap the parts of the piston back into the Lever Group Body - patience and super care to line things up and gently get them in is the key;
    7. Molykote 111 lubricant. A think smear is all that is needed on the gasket and silicon O-ring (if you like). Do not overgrease - excess grease will end up coating the edges of the shower screen.

    Ultimately, it is beautifully simple. Unfortunately, the vital part required to take the piston head off is not readily available.

    Note - the springs are not held on by the piston head. There is a separate large bolt holding them in position which sits underneath the piston - which is exposed once the piston is removed.

  12. #562
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    So, with the right tool, my understanding is that you can service the group head after screwing the piston out from underneath without disassembling the whole lot and removing it from the main body.
    Just out of curiosity, has anyone tried to contact the manufacturer in Italy?
    Even the people at Jetblack said that to service this machine they would either remove the top assembly or manufacture their own tool.

  13. #563
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    Hi All,
    Some information here
    http://www.home-barista.com/levers/i...t25094-40.html

    I haven't made a tool out of pvc as was hoping to purchase one. If anyone finds one, lots of us would be keen to know where from
    Cheers
    Dave
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  14. #564
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hack View Post
    So, with the right tool, my understanding is that you can service the group head after screwing the piston out from underneath without disassembling the whole lot and removing it from the main body.
    Yes you probably can.
    I haven't tried that.
    I think the shower screen would be hard to get out and in upside down.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hack View Post
    Even the people at Jetblack said that to service this machine they would either remove the top assembly or manufacture their own tool.
    Does that mean Jetblack hasn't serviced one?

    I wonder if anyone has.

    Tool wouldn't need to be super strong - there's not a huge amount of pressure on the piston head when screwed in.

  15. #565
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hack View Post
    Just out of curiosity, has anyone tried to contact the manufacturer in Italy?
    Gave that a try.
    Answer - couldn't help.

  16. #566
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    Just trying to understand here (have not seen a disassembled LSM group in person)...is it necessary to unscrew the piston for servicing? Can't we just remove the lever/piston assembly from the top, and stretch the gasket over the piston (I am assuming we're trying to replace the piston seal here)?

  17. #567
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    Quote Originally Posted by samuellaw178 View Post
    Just trying to understand here (have not seen a disassembled LSM group in person)...is it necessary to unscrew the piston for servicing? Can't we just remove the lever/piston assembly from the top, and stretch the gasket over the piston (I am assuming we're trying to replace the piston seal here)?
    No. Two reasons.

    1: the gasket will not stretch over the piston. It is not that flexible and it sits partly inside the piston itself. It isn't a simple ring like the gasket at the group head.

    2: once a new gasket is an installed it will not go back in from the top. It is too wide when new.
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  18. #568
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    Hi All,
    In the meantime I removed shower screen and soaked in machine cleaner. I then cleaned (with a brush and machine cleaner) and re-lubricated the bore of the cylinder (when it was cool) with Inox MX6
    I put some Inox on the top of the rod (which inserts into the group head) with the lever depressed
    I moved the lever up and down a number of times to spread the Inox
    It certainly feels smoother
    This will do temporarily until I can find a tool to remove the piston and completely disassemble it
    Cheers
    Dave

  19. #569
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr_Dave View Post
    Hi All,
    In the meantime I removed shower screen and soaked in machine cleaner. I then cleaned (with a brush and machine cleaner) and re-lubricated the bore of the cylinder (when it was cool) with Inox MX6
    I put some Inox on the top of the rod (which inserts into the group head) with the lever depressed
    I moved the lever up and down a number of times to spread the Inox
    It certainly feels smoother
    This will do temporarily until I can find a tool to remove the piston and completely disassemble it
    Cheers
    Dave
    I suggest using Molykote 111 as your lubricant. It is thicker than Inox and seems to hold position better/not move around in the bore as much.
    I found Inox didn't last as long or as well.

    The amount of lube you ideally need is a smear on the seals.
    I don't think you need it on the bore - but agree it does help if you the piston isn't moving smoothly.
    My experience suggests that if you need more lube you should be replacing the gasket (black seal) on the piston.

    Mine certainly works better now the gasket is replaced, with minimal lube.
    One person suggested to me I needed no lube at all - but I am not sure about that. Izzo installs the piston lubed.

    I now also move the piston smoothly up and down only full length.
    I was doing some short stroke movements to allow water through for cleaning. I am guessing that may have caused some of my sticky piston problems.

  20. #570
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    Re-fill
    My re-fill was painfully slow.
    I removed my in-line pressure regulator.
    Problem solved - flow now normal.
    I suspect the restricted flow/slow re-fill also played a bit of havoc with the water level sensor. From time to time I had to turn the machine off and on to reset it, as it was failing to re-fill.
    Hasn't been a problem since pressure regulator removed.

    I have an in-line water filter also (3M).

    Was willing to go without pressure regulator, but might not be a "risk" everyone is willing to take.
    I made the change because of the issues I was having on failure to re-fill.

  21. #571
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    Have you tried replacing the regulator? Could it have been fully?

  22. #572
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    Quote Originally Posted by level3ninja View Post
    Have you tried replacing the regulator? Could it have been fully?
    No.
    I'll check in with my water filter people.

  23. #573
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    Thanks Almac,
    Is it possible to give some simple instructions ( and any photo's you may have) on how you replaced the gasket please?
    Many thanks
    Dave

  24. #574
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr_Dave View Post
    Thanks Almac,
    Is it possible to give some simple instructions ( and any photo's you may have) on how you replaced the gasket please?
    Many thanks
    Dave
    Sure.

    I turned off and let the machine cool fully so nothing is expanded by the heat.

    Removed piston head by unscrewing the four screws that hold the head to the bore.

    Removed bore by unscrewing the four bolts that hold it onto the machine body.
    Removed shower screen from bore.

    I do not have the tool to remove the piston head, so used a 6mm pin wrench (first and second pictures below).
    Basically, you need a 6mm sized "pin" to go into the holes on the piston head.

    I then unscrewed the piston head (first picture). It comes off by itself. It does not hold the spring on - that is a separate bolt that sits inside the piston head.

    You can then pull the piston head apart (third and fourth photos). When you do this be very careful to lay everything out in order and so that you can reassemble it up/down the same way it was. In particular, the white silicon ring needs to go back in the same way - not upside down.

    In the last picture you'll see the that black gasket goes into the piston head on the left.
    I cleaned everything with a clean rag/paper towel (piston head and bore).
    I put a light smear of grease over the new gasket and inserted it back into the piston head.

    Next I put the group lever head back onto the bore so I had a the whole group reassembled with the piston removed.
    The gasket has to be installed this way. A new gasket will not slide back into the bore from the top.

    I lightly lubed the outside of the silicon ring and gasket.

    Placed whole group into vice - you need something to keep it in place.

    Next I gently re-installed the piston piece by piece in order into the group head. As the pieces are a tight fit I very carefully worked them in (especially the gasket). A rubber mallet was useful for a light tap.

    Now I had a problem because I didn't have a tool to tighten the group head in the bore.
    I screwed it in as far as I could.
    I then took two 6mm hex/allen keys and a large screw driver. I placed an allen key on either side of the screw driver, held it all in place by hand and screwed the piston back in - being super careful not to scratch the bore - the allen keys need to sit well inside the piston head holes.
    I screwed the piston head in far enough so that I could re-install the shower screen.

    Reinstalled group head onto body of machine.
    Attached Images Attached Images
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  25. #575
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    Hi,
    That's really helpful - thank you so much!
    Certainly a project in the next few months
    Cheers
    Dave

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    Really well done AlMac, If you own one of these machines you need to know how to service it every couple of years. JK

  27. #577
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    Hello AlMac
    Thank you for your helpful explanations. I haven't been here in the forum for a long time, but the topic looks familiar to me.
    Do you think it is easier to turn the piston after removing the head, or doesn't it matter at all?

    About one year ago I tried to open the group to check for some dirt behind as I had also a rusty spring fixing the shower.


    I made a sample of this famous tool and found that the piston was even too tough to turn. I made the Izzo dancing around on the kitchen table, but it didn't turn.

    As I was a little bit afraid of opening it anyway and had no real reason to open it, I decided to postpone it to "some time" together with a friend fixing the machine.

    Therefore just the hint, one might need quite some force and a solid lever to turning out the piston.






    Tool with lever


    rusty spring before exchanging it

    Peter

  28. #578
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    Hi peter42, This is just a suggestion, These pistons can be really hard to break loose, You may have to remove the assembly from the top with the piston intact, Then remove the piston in a vice,Being very careful not to damage it( wood,leather,rubber), Then follow AlMacs instructions for reinstall. Then that great tool you made will work great from then on. A word of caution to all, The shaft that holds the piston has threads on both ends,If you break loose the upper threads you can release the spring in which case you will get a Big surprise, You may want to mark the shaft so you know that you are turning the piston and not the shaft. It is a shame that izzo has not addressed the rusty circlip on the shower screen yet. Jim

  29. #579
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    I'm a bit late on this but have you checked the group head assembly video that Izzo produced?
    I found a copy via Google.

    Greg

  30. #580
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    Izzo Alex Leva

    Quote Originally Posted by GregWormald View Post
    I'm a bit late on this but have you checked the group head assembly video that Izzo produced?
    I found a copy via Google.

    Greg
    There is a link in the early pages of this thread. Maybe page 12?

    Here
    Quote Originally Posted by TC View Post
    We have success.

    The video can be accessed at https://www.dropbox.com/s/v1xwm0wi5j...rvice.avi?dl=0

  31. #581
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter42 View Post
    [SIZE=2]Do you think it is easier to turn the piston after removing the head, or doesn't it matter at all?
    Peter - that tool looks great.
    Could you share the measurements for it - one of my relatives offered to make me one?

    I would definitely remove lever group to work on it.
    Puffink's advice is really helpful - I wasn't aware of that, but it makes sense.
    With the whole lever group disassembled it makes it far easier to see what is moving.

    It is so easy to take the whole Lever off the machine body and then remove the Lever/piston from the lower bore body that I would always take them completely apart to work on.
    It also allows you more easily clean up the bore internals (I would take the opportunity to clean out the grease and re-grease as per my post above).

    My piston head only required light force to screw off.
    I also don't think it needs a lot of force to screw it back on - as you only want it sitting just behind the shower screen.

    I would also be cleaning and re-greasing the threads that the piston head screws on to.

    Basically, once it is apart I'd take the opportunity to clean everything and, where it needs lube, re-grease (always lightly with Molykote 111).

  32. #582
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    I ordered a aluminum pipe 50 x 5 mm.
    The nozzles are 5.2 mm long and 5mm high, acc memory as I am on a trip currently.
    I needed a file on the inner edges, due to the shape of the holes in the piston.
    My version is 50 mm long, but 60 or 70mm should be more convenient

  33. #583
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    Hi everyone,
    I am getting beeps from the machine every now and then. It comes after a couple of espressos and the machine is on for a couple of hours or so. The PID goes off too. After switching the machine off and then on it goes back to normal. Does this happen to anyone else?
    Thanks.

  34. #584
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    Further to that, I suspect it has to do with a low water level in the tank, PID switching off to prevent burning off the heater. Maybe my water pressure is not strong enough in the water line?

  35. #585
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    Hi Hack,
    The only beep that I know of is the low water alarm, so I suspect that is what it is. The PID will go off when it suspects a low water level to prevent frying your boiler

    I am not an expert but here are my thoughts:

    1. Do you have a Brita filter in line? -If so, perhaps increasing the bypass %, this is in case the sensor is not reading correctly due to low ion concentration in the water. You can do a water test to check and then increase the bypass % and recheck.

    2. If not it may be the sensor itself - you can remove the sensor and scrub it

    If these don't work I would speak to an expert - whoever you purchased from or Chris at Talk Coffee is great

    Let us know how you get on
    Cheers
    Dave

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    Thanks Dave. I will increase the bypass percentage. see how I go.

  37. #587
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    Hi everyone,
    I'm new to the forum and this is my first post. I thought I was the only one who was in love with the Alex Leva! Love that I've found a bunch of people who are as enthusiastic as I am over the machine. I've had it for two years now and its been flawless. The coffee quality is second to none. I have it paired with an HG1 83mm conical hand grinder. But every now and again when I am entertaining a bunch of people, it's really becoming a bit of a pain to hand grind. Now not to start any arguments, but I wanted some of your thoughts on what most people have paired with their machine that is electric. Will not get rid of my HG1 hand grinder but I want an easier option when I'm making a lot of coffee. I've been looking at the Mahlkonig K30, the Compak 8 or 10 or Macap MD7. I primarily drink South American dark roast (European) espresso but my wife and kids like a milk based coffees. I was thinking about going flat like the K30 to have the versatility of having both a large conical and large flat burr. Not to complicate things even more, but I heard that conicals are better for milk based coffee and flat is better for espressos. This thread is getting too long, but if you guys have any ideas I would appreciate any suggestions. Thanks again

  38. #588
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    Hi Fpedra,
    I had a Macap M4D for a number of years which was brilliant, however this year (after lots of research) I moved to a large conical
    I bought a Compak F10 as I really like the micrometric adjustment rather than the collar adjustment on the E10
    It is everything I have ever wanted in a grinder (quick, quiet,low retention, beautifully built etc.) and I am extremely happy with it
    Cheers
    Dave
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  39. #589
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    I had some time for tinkering the last days. But it seems that at the last assembling something went wrong with the portafilter





    So to say, I feel like a follower of Aristoteles:
    Give me a lever and a place to stand and I move the world

    This way not only the world, but even the piston moves.








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  40. #590
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    In the first run I did by not start with the big lever, but was thinking about the small handles available.
    Therefore the tool has several threads - not for simultanious use:




    Left side: M8 for tamper handle
    Right side: M10 for portafilter handle, both should be fine for normal use.
    The thread of the lever is M18 x 1.5. Not a standard thread, but I found a tap in a Chinese all-inclusive assortment.


    The black plastic spacer is to fix the lever and the tool into one block, with all the lever thread inside the tool and there is some tape to avoid any form of scatch or lines on the parts.





    A general question about spare parts:

    http://www.cafeparts.com/Diagram/3626/0


    When looking on the spare parts diagram, I am not sure which gasket (s) I should have available when opening the group and which one should be replaced after some years.
    I assume it is (only) part 32 - lip seal.
    And to put some grease in this area in the cylinder.
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  41. #591
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    Hi Pete,
    Amazing talent !!
    They look superb

    I have ordered parts 30 and 32 (teflon ring and lip seal) on your diagram
    Or locally - https://www.coffeeparts.com.au/parts...ver-group-head
    Parts - 700467 and 700466 for when I replace mine, as others say the teflon ring gets distorted with age , however on your exploded diagram it is green and on the local one is white
    Cheers
    Dave

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter42 View Post
    In the first run I did by not start with the big lever, but was thinking about the small handles available.
    Therefore the tool has several threads - not for simultanious use:




    Left side: M8 for tamper handle
    Right side: M10 for portafilter handle, both should be fine for normal use.
    The thread of the lever is M18 x 1.5. Not a standard thread, but I found a tap in a Chinese all-inclusive assortment.


    The black plastic spacer is to fix the lever and the tool into one block, with all the lever thread inside the tool and there is some tape to avoid any form of scatch or lines on the parts.





    A general question about spare parts:

    http://www.cafeparts.com/Diagram/3626/0


    When looking on the spare parts diagram, I am not sure which gasket (s) I should have available when opening the group and which one should be replaced after some years.
    I assume it is (only) part 32 - lip seal.
    And to put some grease in this area in the cylinder.

  42. #592
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    One hint on the group head gasket, as several of us had the experience of a PF smashing a cup.
    I don't know if this is still relevant in Australia as there was support here at CS. In Germany there were several angry discussions about this.

    The thickness of the gasket is different, depending from where you buy it.
    Original Izzo is 6 mm (as in your link)
    LSM version (as my english link here) is 5.5 mm
    LSM (german general distributer) is 5.7 mm

    Maybe it can be solved by asking at ordering to get a specific thickness.

    After sacrifying two cups, I put my PFs on the lathe and "solved it finally" as I did not have this info at that time,
    but not everybody has this option.
    0.3 mm make a significant difference regarding the angle to lock the PF.

  43. #593
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    Jul 2013
    Location
    Germany, Giessen
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    50
    It seems that the parts of the LSM and Izzo group head are not exactly the same.
    The group head gaskets are slightly differnt in thickness and
    the bolt holding the piston from LSM has thread only at the lower end. So the risk of unlocking the wrong end is not existing for LSM.
    (Part no. 630426 or no. 41, depending on the web-link)

    Quote Originally Posted by puffink View Post
    Hi peter42, This is just a suggestion, These pistons can be really hard to break loose, You may have to remove the assembly from the top with the piston intact, Then remove the piston in a vice,Being very careful not to damage it( wood,leather,rubber), Then follow AlMacs instructions for reinstall. Then that great tool you made will work great from then on. A word of caution to all, The shaft that holds the piston has threads on both ends,If you break loose the upper threads you can release the spring in which case you will get a Big surprise, You may want to mark the shaft so you know that you are turning the piston and not the shaft. It is a shame that izzo has not addressed the rusty circlip on the shower screen yet. Jim
    Regarding Seeger circlips: My history on this is:
    Original circlip - rusty
    First replacement, 50mm, stainless - broken after one year
    Second replacement, 50mm, diameter fit only after grinding, due to too much material around the holes and the thickness was originally too thick to install due to burr from punching process.




    For me it is much easier to set / de-install the circlip with the holes pointing towards the machine. Which is opposite to intuitive position for me.
    But I can look at the tricky position and set the pliers into the holes, while beeing on my knees in front of the machine.
    It is also easier if it is not the smallest pliers version, but if the pins are around 2,0 to 2,3 mm the circlip follows the position of the pliers.





    It seems to be really worth to buy them at "coffeeparts" and not ordering them via Ebay in a tools shop.
    For me it was just normal to order them somewhere, as I am used to buy standard metal parts. But I saw now on the parts overview that they are nominal 48mm, while you generally get nominal 50mm which fit, but need a much higher force to fit in. The 50 mm are also slightly thicker (at least according to our German standards).

  44. #594
    Junior Member
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    Apr 2016
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    Hi peter42, Wow very well done, all good info, It seems every other guy in germany has a lathe. Jim

  45. #595
    Senior Member
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    Mar 2007
    Location
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    Hi All,
    I understand many pistons are wound on super tight
    Just checking that undoing them is anticlockwise?
    Thanks in advance
    Cheers
    Dave

  46. #596
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    Aug 2011
    Location
    Kweensland
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    Just tuning back in after tuning out for a while and I'm surprised to see so many bitten by the bug to pull their machines apart to fiddle.

    I know curiosity drives us all insane at times but do the benefits outweigh the risks here? Of course if this is your area of knowledge then may the spring force be with you, if it's not, I say some things a best left well alone.

    I've had my unit now for 15 months now and it's pulled circa 2500 shots, I'll have to refresh my memory on service intervals but I think I'd prefer someone who knows the drill to do it. I've read the thread on home-barista.com and just the angony and frustration some went through was enough to turn me off the idea.

    Does anyone know what the service interval is for the leva? I recall Chris suggesting this was not as vital on lever machines as with semi autos.

  47. #597
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    184
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter42 View Post
    One hint on the group head gasket, as several of us had the experience of a PF smashing a cup.
    I don't know if this is still relevant in Australia as there was support here at CS. In Germany there were several angry discussions about this.

    The thickness of the gasket is different, depending from where you buy it.
    Original Izzo is 6 mm (as in your link)
    LSM version (as my english link here) is 5.5 mm
    LSM (german general distributer) is 5.7 mm

    Maybe it can be solved by asking at ordering to get a specific thickness.

    After sacrifying two cups, I put my PFs on the lathe and "solved it finally" as I did not have this info at that time,
    but not everybody has this option.
    0.3 mm make a significant difference regarding the angle to lock the PF.
    I think it was a stuff up in the PF itself. I have earlier version PFs which do slide off and have smashed a few cups.

    My later version naked PF doesn't have that issue.

    Helpful to know that 0.3mm makes a difference.
    Did you just lathe off 0.3mm from the top of each of the lugs on the PF?

  48. #598
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    Jul 2013
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    Germany, Giessen
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    50
    Cutting from the top of the lugs wouldn't change anything. It would be the lower surface.
    But then the hard faced chrome would be off at the most important spot and it would be difficult (to grind.)

    I cut from the top cylindrical ring surface, where the filter sits on.

  49. #599
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    The Hamptons
    Posts
    258
    Hi,
    I understand the new naked now supplied fit properly and dont fly off. I was an early adopter of the Leva and had the issue - I solved it by gently filing the underside of the lugs. I did post about this in this topic some time ago - you will find it if you look back. It was an easy fix and solved the problem

    As to " I'm surprised to see so many bitten by the bug to pull their machines apart to fiddle" Richard - I live 1970km away from Melbourne so it is not so easy to return my machine to service it. As it is now 3.5 years old and made probably more than 5000 shots (still works faultlessly) - I am exploring how to service it myself as I dont have any easy options to do so.
    Cheers
    Dave
    Dimal likes this.

  50. #600
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    Jul 2013
    Location
    Germany, Giessen
    Posts
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    Hello Dave, do you see any significant wear at the underside of the lugs, where you filed the chrome off?
    That is what several guys here where afraid of.

    ( With a lathe in the cellar it is much easier to cut back the top surface :-) ) .

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