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Thread: Hi-end HX lever machines

  1. #1
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    Hi-end HX lever machines

    Hi guys,

    I'm researching single-group lever machines with heat exchanger, copper boiler and direct hook-up for everyday home use.
    Couldn't find information on the exact type of heating system for the following:

    Profitec PRO800
    Londinium I
    Alex Leva
    Izzo Valexia Leva
    Bezzera Strega

    are they HX systems? Any other options?

  2. #2
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    I think the only one on that list that is a HX machine is the Strega. The pro & londinium are both single boiler. Pro is a copper boiler and londinium I think is stainless (someone might be able to correct me though!)
    Magic_Matt likes this.

  3. #3
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    Any specific reason why it has to be an HX? Just curious.

    All the machines listed are using copper boiler.

    Pro800 - Dipper (draws water from boiler), passive heated group, optional plumb in
    Londinium 1 - This is a huge 1 group lever, 7L boiler if I recall correctly. Used to be named L1P, are you referring to the Londinium R(replaced the old Londinium 1) instead?
    Londinium R - Heat exchanger, thermosiphon heated group, possible to plumb but a bit more involved
    Alex Leva, Valexia - Same machine,in different frame/body. Dipper, passive heated group, compulsory plumb in
    Strega - Heat exchanger, cartridge heated group, optional plumb in (specify when ordering)

    There are also the Quickmill Achille (quite similar config to Londinium R), Izzo Pompei (larger version of Alex Leva). Other than that, not really a lot of options out there for home use. There're a few more but are less popular/available, like San Marco, Brasillia, CMA, Conti etc but their availability is quite obscure, might have to do a direct import/special order...most levers are dippers as they're easier to build & simpler to setup

  4. #4
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    Just so you know your options in the high end, there is also tbe dual boiler ACS Vostok.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bosco_Lever's Avatar
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    There is also the Bosco, handmade by a little company in Naples, with decades of experience in making levers. Available via an Australian distributor, and has excellent back up and service.
    Reliable, easy to use, low cost of ownership, and one of the best kept secrets around.
    Dimal, samuellaw178 and DonnerJack like this.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by samuellaw178 View Post
    Any specific reason why it has to be an HX? Just curious.
    My main reason for HX is extraction with fresh running water, not going through a water tank.
    Especially for home use, 3-4 cups per day, a water tank doesn't get as much rotation as in commercial use.
    Still learning though, so please correct me if I'm wrong.

    My next question was going to be the difference between Alex Leva, Izzo Valexia Leva -- already answered. Thanks so much guys!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bosco_Lever's Avatar
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    If your main concern is the rotation of water in the tank, then buy a Cremina. They are small and would suit that brief.
    If you want a high end lever, you simply don't think of that aspect. You have a massive lump of steel that has to be heated and kept at the right temp, you won't achieve that with a piddly little boiler.
    Most of the "information" on the web is irrelevant about levers, or just mythical nonsense. If you know how to consistently make good espresso, then the most important thing with a lever, is temperature stability. That is the ability to pull shot after shot, consistently.
    Main points to consider when buying one are:
    -Ease of use
    -Parts availability.
    -Space and plumbing requirements.
    -Aesthetics
    -Return on investment
    -Group handle basket size. Not all are 58mm. I use a variety of baskets with mine and would never consider a unit that does not allow this.
    -Brand longevity.
    Last edited by Bosco_Lever; 5 Days Ago at 03:18 PM.

  8. #8
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    I agree with Bosco, i wouldn't worry about the fresh water aspect. If you use properly filtered water (or water that is in adequate parameters) it will stay fresh inside the boiler almost indefinitely.
    Keep in mind the larger boilers will take a lot longer to heat up and something small like a cremina or a pavoni would be better suited to a small number of cups. Having said that I upgraded from the pavoni to the profitec pro and love it so far. It is much better when you have 5 or six friends around for coffee and can pump them out better than a pavoni or cremina could.

    Bosco also raises a good point about a 58mm basket and parts will be interchangeable/standard much more often.

  9. #9
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    All good points.
    If I disregard the water circulation aspect, my next order of importance would be:
    build quality, reliability and brand.
    I want to go with a lever because of natural mechanical simplicity, avoiding any electronic components.
    Right now, I'm leaning towards Izzo Valexia Leva. Not sure if I can get it in Los Angeles though. Can't find it on any US pages.
    So maybe Alex Leva instead...

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    One difference between some of these machines is the pre infusion pressure which varies between about 1 to 3 bar.
    Just something else to consider.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Bosco_Lever's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greg-g View Post
    One difference between some of these machines is the pre infusion pressure which varies between about 1 to 3 bar.
    Just something else to consider.
    Seriously?
    Are you actually able to quantify that this will make a difference to how the coffee tastes?

    Too much myth and lore on the internet.
    Buy specialty grade beans (85+), that will make the biggest biggest difference in the cup.
    Dimal likes this.

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