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Thread: Portaspresso Rossa HC-P vs. Rossa PG

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    Portaspresso Rossa HC-P vs. Rossa PG

    I've been reading a lot within the forums and have contacted Ross to get more details about the two devices to try and make a decision. Both obviously produce a beautiful espresso but both have their own little quirks. What I'm trying to find out are the little details that people find when you use a machine over time, things that you wouldn't consider prior to a purchase.

    I'm conflicted between the two for the reasons:

    - Rossa HC offers good control for pressure profiling which is something that I've been wanting to play with. Compared to the Rossa PG, which one has the better ability to control an extraction.

    -Ross in an interview said that he preferred the Rossa PG for the reason that all the effort is performed before making an espresso. The Rossa HC obviously needs effort to be placed whilst extracting but it made me realise that the resting the crank may be be slightly annoying. Whilst visiting Merlo in the Valley (BNE) I was able to have a closer look at the HC and had noticed this. Is it that much of an issue?

    I've watched the videos of Ross and read the forum hundreds of times and this is what I've boiled my main concerns to be. If there are any other details, please let me know!

    Thanks in advance!
    Last edited by pdmeyer; 20th May 2015 at 09:56 PM. Reason: editing out html

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    Sounds like you've already done your research and yes, both of them have their own quirks. If your primary goal is excellent shots, you'll be satisfied with either (I was). I have had both and with HC now.

    Re pressure profiling:
    HC is much more flexible and capable of executing those odd profiles for your experiments. In fact, probably more flexible than needed for everyday use. It takes a more conscious mind/effort for every shot, in order to control the pressure(not that it's difficult but human tends to be lazy or go the easy route). Gauge is a neccesity in my opinion, but going by feel is possible.You'll (I was) be surprised how subtle the force is needed to change the brew pressure. Note that HC can't ramp up as fast as the PG, but can have a way more delicate control in the preinfusion stage (<1.0bar range).

    PG can do a declining/constant pressure profile easily and that's practically what you need most of the time. It can do fast ramp up, but you can't ramp down suddenly and the preinfusion stage pressure control is coarser than the HC. It is more limited in that sense.

    Conclusion: For the ability to pull off a wide array of pressure profiles, HC wins. For ease of use & practicality, PG is the one.

    Re resting the crank:

    Not sure if I get what you mean there. Do you mean the protruding crank handle can be in the way? In my experience, no, it doesn't bother me. The only moment that it is annoying is taking it in and out of the tripod stand. To that, I modified the tripod stand and love it ever since. [see attached pic & videos, Modified http://youtu.be/w0C0EIkECSA Original https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGGi...ature=youtu.be

    Conclusion: None issue (unless I misinterpret your question)

    Re other concerns that you'll only notice post-purchase
    i) Cleaning:
    With HC, you will always end up with coffee soup/slurry. A sink access is a must. PG is way superior in that sense. Dry puck knocks out cleanly and cleaning the plastic base can be done casually (which doesn't have to be dried unlike the Rossa metal body).

    Conclusion: PG wins by far.

    ii) Durability
    HC should be longer lasting as compared to PG, provided you take care of the thread cleanliness and lube the thread before use. I haven't seen/experienced any mechanical problem with the HC. On the other hand, I have seen some reports of air cylinder leaking (aluminium especially) on the PG version. I'm not sure if brass PG would have the problem, only time will tell.

    Conclusion: HC wins. Uncertain for the brass PG.

    iii) Pumping or hand crank?
    Both are easy but may be bothersome in the long run. The beauty of hand crank is that you have less parts and less work (compared to using a hand shock pump). The pumping can be made easy if you have a floor pump/electric pump (noisy), worth it if you value the ease of use over HC.

    Conclusion: Ties, depends on preference.

    iv) Learning curve/shot-to-shot consistency
    PG is way easier to master than the HC, which needs coordination and muscle memory. 5 shots or so with the PG(may vary for individual) and you're close to mastery. For HC, I spent almost a few weeks(lots of practices in between) without gauge to get decent shots 70% of the time, but it wasn't consistent due to not knowing the pressure. Finally I broke down and bought the gauge. Even then, I can only get shots as predicted in 90-95% of the time, whereas with the PG I'd have the confidence of 99%. 90-95% is good for most people(and me) but doesn't change the fact that PG is easier to master/predict.

    Conclusion: PG wins.


    So it really boils down to what's your usage and which quirks you can put up with. Or even better, don't decide and buy both. :P
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    Last edited by samuellaw178; 21st May 2015 at 12:18 PM.

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    samuellaw178 your response is amazing! Thanks so much for taking the time to answer my questions. I'm leaning more towards the HC mainly because I like the the ability to have the finer control. I know that this will basically allow for inconsistencies but it's through these mistakes you'll learn more about the process.

    Due to being tired when I wrote the post I actually meant resetting not resting the hand crank. For example if I was two make a second shot for my wife, is it a tedious procedure to wind the handle back or have you become nonchalant?

    Through my error though, you have highlighted an issue which I had considered and was prepared to just accept. The modification you've proposed is an excellent solution! Would you mind me asked how you did this? Did you just use a dermel drill or something similar?

    Finally in regards to the HC and preparing a second shot, is it a messy procedure? Obviously this will be more so than the PG as it runs dry but is it something that you get use to when you figure out your own methods and procedures?

    Before I forget, I know you mentioned you have both but do you have a favourite? Or do you use each one of them for different occasions?

    Again thanks for your help and for the videos too!

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    Thanks for the kind words! I was in your position once so I'm more than happy to help.

    As for the mod, just a serrrated pipe cutter and about 30 minute of your time. No tools involved and the plastic is not difficult to cut.

    Reseting hand crank may be a bit bothersome when doing back-to-back shots, but not too bad. Technically, doing a second shot is no different from doing the first shot, you're starting everything all over again. Compared to reseting the crank, I find cleaning in between shots more annoying. Still find it(cleaning) annoying after months and don't think it can improve with time. But the shots it makes is good, so I just have to put up with it.

    I like PG because it's easy to clean and easy to pull shots, but didn't like the pumping aspect and the many individual parts. I like the HC's compact form factor, but didn't like the cleaning and the fact that you have to get 'wet' when making shots. As you and I said, both with its quirks, so I have no favourite. If I had to choose, I may give a *very* slight favor towards PG but only because I don't have PG now (the mentality of grass is always greener on the other side). Haha.

    All in all, nothing that is a deal breaker. You'll always wish it's easier, but most probably will forget it after tasting the shot.

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    Sorry for the late reply, but wanted to say a massive thanks samuellaw178 . I'm pretty set on my mind on which one I would prefer - the HC. Just a matter now to get the funds and make an order! Thanks again.

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    Back again. Still haven't made a purchase but wanted to see if anyone knows where I could view a PG or HC in action in Brisbane. I know that there was one at Merlo in the valley but unfortunately no-one knew how to use it. Would be also be keen to see Rosco Grinder in action too if possible.

    Thanks in advance!

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    I can't help you with a viewing as I live in Tassie but a few months go I was in the same position as you - which to buy.

    So we were travelling through Queensland recently and we asked Ross if he would do a demo for us. This he very kindly did - what a genuinely good guy Ross is. I went to the demo expecting to buy the HC and ended up placing an order for the Brass PG. Why? Well I want to try different pressure profiles and I believed I could do these better using the air control rather than the winding method.

    I have had the PG matched with a Rosco for a couple of weeks now and am coming to grips with it. I bought a shock pump to charge the cylinder but (being of a mature age and growing arthritis) I find this needs more effort than expected so I am now looking for a 12v battery and a cheap electric pump handling up to 15 bar to use instead. (There is a difficulty over where to keep battery and pump as it will not be allowed in the kitchen. SWMBO is very happy to sup the results but the kitchen must not resemble my shed!!)

    Anyway, we have not regretted the purchase. I love the way I can grind straight into the filter, tamp and attach to the PG. The resulting shots are much better than those I can pull from our Breville Infuser and, I believe, match almost anything we have found commercially in Tasmania to date. The straight espresso is just so tasty I am getting sidetracked from lattes.

    As to pressure profiling. I am not very good at the control as yet. Sometimes it almost works and other times the grind is wrong and I have little control. It will come with time (I tell myself) and the odd one that works really well shows the control is there. However, current results are good even if 'profiling' only gives an initial infusion stage followed by a quick ramp up to 8 bars! I am finding that the grind is so important and can see I will need a few more months to get this totally sorted to enable repeatable results!

    All the best with your decision making and I hope this helped a little.

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    Thanks for the advice AntC1946. Now i'm really torn because I've gone and had another look at the PG through Ross' videos and it seems like it's a device with greater control. I really need to see Ross and see these two in action. I just don't like the idea of having to bring a pump no matter where I go, but if it definitely enables good coffee compared to the HC I might make an exception.

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    I see that you still haven't decided. To make it even more complicated, I'm throwing one more option into the mix. There's a new device called EspressoForge just came into the market recently. I have one (V1) it performs fairly admirably. It looks ugly compared to Rossa, but is easier to use than both the Rossa. Look up youtube to have an idea.

    Shot quality wise - it's brewing at a lower temp and thus the shot is softer (not good or bad, just different and it is pretty decent cup). The body I reckon is slightly lesser than Rossa, but not by much. Construction-wise it is a tiny bit more bomb-proof than Rossa and uses 58mm basket accesories. Though, it requires hot water filling via a narrow opening. Not sure if that's your thing.

    Bombora is the distributor in Oz but not sure if they're going through any dealer.

    But I don't mean to retract from the Rossas - either one of them is a solid performer and an amazing work of art. But as with all beauties(and even uglies), they do have their own little quirks.
    Last edited by samuellaw178; 8th September 2015 at 09:46 AM.

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    Senior Member Beanz.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AntC1946 View Post

    I have had the PG matched with a Rosco for a couple of weeks now and am coming to grips with it. I bought a shock pump to charge the cylinder but (being of a mature age and growing arthritis) I find this needs more effort than expected so I am now looking for a 12v battery and a cheap electric pump handling up to 15 bar to use instead. (There is a difficulty over where to keep battery and pump as it will not be allowed in the kitchen. SWMBO is very happy to sup the results but the kitchen must not resemble my shed!!)
    Initially I used a small hand shock pump which works well but requires quite a few pumps to achieve the required pressure but I recently purchased an Ultra High Pressure Floor mounted shock pump made by Airtool. It is much easier to use and only requires about 10 pumps to fill an empty cylinder to 15 Bar, it is capable of going to 24 Bar. They are made by Specialized and are available in a number of bike shops. You might find it a better option than a battery and electric pump. Mine fits under a bench so it may fit in your kitchen somewhere.
    You will find in time you will have total control of the profile to the point where you will easily control the profile even when the roast or the grind varies. if you are using a double basket and finding it difficult go to a smaller basket. I use a 9g basket and typically load it with around 16g and get a great shot every time. San Marco baskets fit and are available from Coffee Parts

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    Thanks Beanz. I have been looking for a small electric pump but the ones I found only go to 150psi. I will now go on a mission to find an Ultra HP floor pump.

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    I might correct my terminology in the previous post, the manufacturer is Specialized and their product name is Air Tool

    When I started looking most bike shops indicated there were no Floor shock pumps available and why would I want one anyway, they will try to sell you a high pressure floor pump for tyres, they do not go to the same pressure so be sure to check

    Once I identified the correct product I found them in stock in Melbourne

    The Tasmanian Specialized distributors are listed on the Specialized Australian web site. Good luck

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    See PM with additional info

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    I have been using my lezyne travel floor pump with my PG since I got it. This pump is small enough to hide in the space beside the fridge in my kitchen or throw in the car or camper if travelling. It has no problem getting to pressure (the pump is rated to 160psi/15 bar) with generally only 4-5 pumps to recharge the pressure cylinder from last use and maybe twice that from empty. I will soon have to replace the o ring on the pump shaft, but that is to be expected after daily use for the last 18+ months.

    There is an art to using a floor pump (body weight rather than just arm strength) but if I can manage it (160cm/58kg) anyone can.

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    Further information.

    I am now using a foot pump which is much easier - thanks Beanz and Jellybean.

    I have also determined with Ross that I managed to damage the seal in the PG (over-tightening) and have installed an Acetal version of the seal. While this gives a softer feel I find it very usable and I can now control a double filter basket fully loaded getting infusion followed by a ramp up in pressure as I require. The results continue to be very good!!

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    Sorry for the long silence but to update with my decision. I've ended ordering the Rossa PG for the reasons of consistency, ease of clean up and with the ability to still being able to play with pressure. As much as I love being able to have the full feeling of being able to make a coffee, time isn't on my side especially with no.2 on the way!

    Thanks everyone for all your input. Greatly appreciate all your advice.

    AntC1946 - Just wondering what pump you're using? I've got a floor bike pump but want to consider all options.

    samuellaw178 - Trust you to throw the forge into the mix! I did investigate this and looked into costs but at the end of the day the Rossa won because the costs were the same and would prefer to support Aussie made. I did read your review on the forge and was greatly impressed (and thanks for prolonging my decision ;-) )

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    Hey pdmeyer,

    Which type of seal did you order for your PG cylinder? Standard is the brass version. Make sure you never over-tighten it. Brass has less springiness , so it is easier to have a lower pre-infusion pressure.
    Acetal has springiness, but seals better and prevents component damage. I

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    Hey beo1329, with my conversations with Ross, I believe he recommended the Acetal seal due to the longevity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pdmeyer View Post
    Hey beo1329, with my conversations with Ross, I believe he recommended the Acetal seal due to the longevity.
    Ross told me this:

    "The acetal seat is designed to provide a better seal and prevent component damage, but the brass seat is better for pressure control because it has no springiness. "

    It more about component damage, rather than longevity. If you do not over-tighten the brass , it will be OK. Some people have really heavy hands or they forget that the seal is not meant to tighten it with force.

    Also he told me this: " It is quite hard, but still has a bit of spring. Importantly though, it seals well and won't damage the valve stem if over tightened. The brass seat is best for performance though because it has zero spring. Much better feel."

    I went with the performance. Ross might recommend the acetal to people, because a lot of people have damaged the seal , because they tightened the valve too much. This was the sole reason developing the acetal version. However if it has springiness, it would be difficult to register 0.5 and 1 bar. With the brass I can.

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    I had no idea beo1329 that there was a major difference between the two. I'll have to have a bit of a think and see which one I would prefer. Thanks for the insight.

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    Well, there is a big difference. If you can be sure that you will tighten it only gently, go with brass. Make sure you never allow anyone to handle the cylinder. Once I did that and the guy tightened it with some force, luckily there was no damage.
    If you want to play with pressure profiling, also go with brass. No springiness and if you charge the cylinder to 15 bar, you can be sure that you can manage a low pressure pre-infusion.

    I've exchanged a lot of emails with Ross, customer service is top notch and I'm glad that I can share the info with other users.
    Paolo likes this.

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    Hi All. Sorry I have not responded earlier. Re the foot pump, initially I was using a borrowed bicycle tyre foot pump which could get up to 11 Bars at a struggle. After waiting for a while (things take longer to obtain in Tasmania) on Monday I took delivery of a Specialised Air Tool shock pump - which is far superior. I can now easily pump up the cylinder!

    I have used the acetal seal for a few weeks. Initially it did allow control for pre infusion and later control pressure ramp up. After a few weeks though that control has gone. Once the pressure begins to come through it just keeps on coming with little control available. The results remain good in the cup though.

    I plan to work on the brass seal to see if I can reduce or stop the bubbling as the 'profilability' provided by it is much superior.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AntC1946 View Post
    I have used the acetal seal for a few weeks. Initially it did allow control for pre infusion and later control pressure ramp up. After a few weeks though that control has gone. Once the pressure begins to come through it just keeps on coming with little control available. The results remain good in the cup though.
    I plan to work on the brass seal to see if I can reduce or stop the bubbling as the 'profilability' provided by it is much superior.
    I am unclear about this acetal seal, is this a washer that goes between the body and cylinder or is it a replacement O ring on the cylinder face ? Can someone post a photo ?

    From your description I believe the problem you have is coffee grinds building up inside the tube on the pressure gauge, when that blocks it can show a jump in pressure in excess of what you anticipate with no ability to control it. To clean it carefully use a toothpick, the more solid round variety that will not break off, and gently move it back and forth inside the tube, then rinse the body making sure water can access the pressure gauge entrance and then give the Rossa body a firm shake / flick a few times with the gauge hole down and you will see grinds come out. Repeat the process until no more grinds are visible.
    You should then have total control again.

    If you get some coffee grinds, dirt or a fibre on the the face of the needle or seat you will get a slight leak showing as bubbling. You can unscrew the "knurled pressure control" from the cylinder body to give it a clean. The seat can also be removed from the base of the cylinder to be cleaned. I smear some Dow 111 on the surface before reassembling to preserve the surfaces.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beanz. View Post
    I am unclear about this acetal seal, is this a washer that goes between the body and cylinder or is it a replacement O ring on the cylinder face ? Can someone post a photo ?

    From your description I believe the problem you have is coffee grinds building up inside the tube on the pressure gauge, when that blocks it can show a jump in pressure in excess of what you anticipate with no ability to control it. To clean it carefully use a toothpick, the more solid round variety that will not break off, and gently move it back and forth inside the tube, then rinse the body making sure water can access the pressure gauge entrance and then give the Rossa body a firm shake / flick a few times with the gauge hole down and you will see grinds come out. Repeat the process until no more grinds are visible.
    You should then have total control again.

    If you get some coffee grinds, dirt or a fibre on the the face of the needle or seat you will get a slight leak showing as bubbling. You can unscrew the "knurled pressure control" from the cylinder body to give it a clean. The seat can also be removed from the base of the cylinder to be cleaned. I smear some Dow 111 on the surface before reassembling to preserve the surfaces.
    Well, I have been away for a little while and, on return, decided to improve my PG Air. But, firstly, here is a picture of the Acetal seal and the brass seal sitting on top of the air cylinder.

    DSCN3192.JPG

    My system (using the acetal seal) was not giving me much control but still producing very nice coffee. So I read the post from Beanz, took it apart and worked on the brass seal with Scotchbrite. Using a small amount of the material and a wooden toothpick I cleaned up the seal area using an up and down motion - carefully!! I could see a small area of damage and worked until it disappeared while attempting to keep the whole seal surface matching in shape.

    I then took out the Pressure gauge from the body of the unit and, as suggested, cleaned out the opening with a toothpick. Some coffee grains were expelled. It didn't seem enough though and with further probing and slapping the gauge against the hand eventually a dam burst and water and coffee grounds that were jammed inside came out.

    The unit was then put back together using plumbers tape on the gauge thread and with the cleaned brass seal. Now, a week later, the seal has bedded in, only a small number of bubbles appear when adding water to the unit - and the number of bubbles is reducing each use as things bed in further. I now have total control over the extraction. Yippee!!

    Thanks Beanz and sorry for the delay in replying.

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    Hello. Anyone in Perth with one of these? Please PM me.

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    Well just placed my order for one! and a friend also! I'm going with PG and she is going with the HG ... ! my Prev user was dparham but i forgot password I had a laugh

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    You and your friend are in for a treat! As said many times before, the Rossa is a functional work of art! Also, the shot at its best can rival a full size commercial spring lever machine easily, just not as convenient in the workflow. The PG in my opinion/experience is easier to master. Your friend may have a bit more learning than you but the end result is worth it - he doesn't have to worry about a pump! The gauge model helps speed up the learning process as well, great choice.

    Also, take extra care to dry the device after use each time and reading the manual will give you the best. The Specialized UHP Airtool pump recommended above by Beanz is a great pump. Expensive, yes, but worth every cent if you're using it every day.

    p/s: how long is the wait?

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    We've had the HC since Dec 2015 and love it. I'm sure the pressure gauge would help with sharing pressure profiles etc, but if your focus is on churning out good shots for self, friends and family it doesn't take long to get a feel for it.

    Re: cleaning the HC, there's a trick. Once you've pulled the shot put a container underneath and crank it _nearly_ all the way down. (If your mother-in-law is visiting you can pass off what you extract here as coffee - it's about what you'd get at a country town servo.) If you wind down all the way you will lose pressure because the barrel flares a little at the bottom. Leave it for a minute or two while you fluff around frothing milk, or enjoying your shot or whatever. Then crank it that last half turn and leave for another couple of minutes. By the time it's just cool enough to handle, 9 times out of 10 you'll have a dry enough puck to tap straight into the bin.

    If you're making shots back to back it doesn't really slow things down much. The time it takes to reload the grinder and grind the next batch of coffee is about the time it takes for the puck to dry. Of course, if you want to grind straight into the filter basket, this won't work, but we have the mini grinder so can grind into the screw-on cup.

    Re: resetting the crank handle between shots. Honestly, you don't really notice it after a while. Because there's no pressure you can use your finger much closer to the axis of the crank handle so each turn needs a lot less movement. Don't forget to use a little cold water to lubricate as per Ross' instructions.

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    Congrats on your order! You won't be disappointed. My PG finally arrived about a week ago and I have been extremely impressed with the quality. I teamed it up with a Rosco and it's the perfect combination. I've been using the acetal seal which has helped me learn the boundaries of the devices. I'll probably change it over to the brass after a couple of months.

    It's been so worth the wait and the after sales service from Ross has been amazing.

    Now I've got to get rid of my HX machine as it's taking too much space.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pdmeyer View Post
    It's been so worth the wait and the after sales service from Ross has been amazing.
    How long was the wait?

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    I can't speak on behalf of Ross regarding wait times as there are too many factors involved but for the PG and Rosco grinder, I had the order placed in mid September last year and it arrived about 2 weeks ago ( 8th April). Honestly it's worth the wait. I've used so many machines (Otto, Rok, HX) in the last few years and this is something that I would keep forever due to its build quality and ease of maintenance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pdmeyer View Post

    Now I've got to get rid of my HX machine as it's taking too much space.
    I'm trying to understand how you can compare a Unico Splendor HX with Portapresso!

    I have a Portapresso and an HX machine, the difference in espresso quality and usability between the two, in favour of the HX is light years apart.

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    Completely understand where you're coming from but I found that the portaspresso suited my need better for my lifestyle. I can have a decent coffee anywhere, anytime with minimal noise. I don't have to worry about descaling the machine, taking it into anywhere if breaks down or having to deal with exorbitant costs to replace parts. If I had the choice I would keep both to keep on dabbling in espresso adventures but I don't have the money to be able to do this unfortunately.

    Do you have the hand crank portaspresso Yelta? Have you tried the PG version?

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    As someone who's tempted by the Rossa PG, I've very keen on hearing from people who had that and a proper HX or DB coffee machine. Is Rossa capable of achieving something close to a HX/DB (or better) in the cup if the water temperature and pressure are adjusted right?
    I'll have to give up my beloved HX machine soon due to moving overseas and I was wondering if I'm better off getting a Rossa PG as a stop gap or stick to using my Caravel lever (and learn to live with mini ristrettos).

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    I am sure Beanz can give some idea as he has a Giotto HX. For me, between a Caravel (owned and sold that) & a Rossa PG, hands down for the later by a huge margin (really no competition there in my opinion unless you fancy 15g ristretto, and even then Rossa can do it better in a bigger volume). The learning curve is not huge, and once you get it, it is my opinion you can equal, if not surpass, most high end HX/DB easily. The only nitpick with Rossa is the less-convenient workflow (preheat procedure & pumping) and care needed to maintain the device in pristine condition. I've had my fair share 'playing' with E61 HX (VBM), E61 DB (Minore), a couple other non-E61 pumps (<$2000), multiple levers - almost a machine-addict . The Rossa is not a stop-gap device and is in a league on its own - untouchable in term of shot quality for $1-1.5k budget range, easily plays well with higher end machines - just more hands on if you don't mind that.

    I am yet to come across anyone who has not been impressed by the shot quality of Rossa PG. There're more than a handful of people I know are recurring customers of Ross/Portaspresso that have a couple of his invention - that certainly speaks something for me.

    The only exception where you might be careful is in case you're at elevation where water boils sub 100 Celcius. That's the only scenario the Rossa wouldn't work well.
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    Much appreciated Samuel, this is exactly the type of information I was after.

  37. #37
    Senior Member Beanz.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roburu View Post
    I've very keen on hearing from people who had that and a proper HX or DB coffee machine. Is Rossa capable of achieving something close to a HX/DB (or better) ........
    I was wondering if I'm better off getting a Rossa PG as a stop gap or stick to using my Caravel lever.....
    I have the Rossa PG Air but I also have a Giotto and a couple of Caravels. In my opinion the Rossa consistently produces better shots than both. If I was in a situation where I had to pick one coffee making device it would be the Rossa.There was a post on HB a few days ago "The coffee of my Rossa PG is even slightly better than of my FAEMA Lambro with the IMS E61 200 TC Teflon coated shower screen"
    The Rossa is great if you want one or two shots back to back but if you have to make a number of shots then the HX makes the process easier. The other consideration is milk based drinks, if you need to steam milk then you would either need to go to the HX/DB or consider something like a Bellman.
    When making milk based drinks I have used the Rossa to pull the shot and the Giotto to steam the milk !
    The other advantage with the Rossa PG is the ability to totally control the pre-infusion and know exactly what pressure is being applied and for how long.
    You will not be disappointed by the Rossa.
    If you do decide to buy one I strongly suggest buying a floor shock pump as it makes everyday use so much easier, the small hand shock pumps are great when travelling on the road but require more pumping. There are details on the floor pump in some of the earlier posts.
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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdmeyer View Post
    Do you have the hand crank portaspresso Yelta? Have you tried the PG version?
    I have the hand crank model PDM, no haven't tried the PG.

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    Thanks Beanz, good info. Looks like I'll be pulling the trigger on a Rosa TR.

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    Give it a try if you can Yelta. A mate of mine has the HC and we're meaning to catch up to compare.

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    Quote Originally Posted by roburu View Post
    Thanks Beanz, good info. Looks like I'll be pulling the trigger on a Rosa TR.
    You really want to add the extra $100 and get the PG model. That makes a huge difference in term of learning curve, shot-to-shot consistency and control. Without a gauge, I would hazard to say you will only be drawing out 40% of Rossa's potential. It's that huge of a difference.

    p/s: It may not be super light weight if you're getting the brass PG(1.8kg). But it's more abuse-able than the aluminium (half the weight but must be cared like a baby to last a lifetime - I prefer aluminium myself and take the extra care to dry it properly after each use). Or alternatively you can get a brass TR(1.3kg) for portability with the external gauge for day-to-day shots at home.
    Last edited by samuellaw178; 24th April 2016 at 12:50 AM.

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    The brass PG is the one I'm after, I just mixed up the names. I did write the right name in my email to Ross though, now I'm just waiting for a reply .

  43. #43
    Senior Member Beanz.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roburu View Post
    .... PG is the one I'm after....
    Excellent decision, the gauge is invaluable for pulling precise shots, controlling the pressure and repeatability. A couple of times my gauge got blocked and was not reading properly and I was flying blind without it, even trying to replicate extractions by memory was way off the mark.
    Make sure you marry it up with a really good grinder in order to get the best out of your new gear
    Good luck

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    Thanks Beanz, hopefully my Pharos will make a good pair with the Rossa.

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    its 2 months average at moment Ross told me and MINE IS READY! Im fulfilling the transaction this week! Very excited! hope the post service is speedy to my place in florida! . Will be paring with a MAZZER MAJOR! hahaha
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    YES!!
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    Looking good .
    I received mine as well last week, very happy with it so far. Can anyone recommend a local source for 55mm IMS competition baskets (IMS B66 San Marco/ Dalla Corte Competition Filter) ? I checked the usual suspects' websites but no luck so far.

    @archtop67
    What do you use to foam milk?

  48. #48
    Senior Member Beanz.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roburu View Post
    Can anyone recommend a local source for 55mm IMS competition baskets (IMS B66 San Marco/ Dalla Corte Competition Filter)
    I have sourced IMS baskets locally for the Rossa Sent details via PM

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    well.. Im much better at latte art but that was just a quick 6am morning shot and decided at last minute to add milk to test it.. behind me is a commercial espresso machine that has a hot water tap and a steam arm I had a laugh i have wondered though if one could have an adapter to the PG pressure chamber that would push out compressed air into a custom wand where the pump adapter goes... then u could heat milk while screwing on the little wand and foam up the milk... usually i find after the shot the chamber is already very hot so maybe it wouldn't cool hot milk too fast... of course a little battery whipper I guess could foam it but it doesn't make microfoam...

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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Quote Originally Posted by Beanz. View Post
    Excellent decision, the gauge is invaluable for pulling precise shots, controlling the pressure and repeatability. A couple of times my gauge got blocked and was not reading properly and I was flying blind without it, even trying to replicate extractions by memory was way off the mark.
    Make sure you marry it up with a really good grinder in order to get the best out of your new gear
    Good luck
    Try this. It is a 67mm diamater 1mm thick silicon sheet with holes drilled. It prevents coffee going into the bore and into the gauge. Works flawlessly.

    Edit: I just recalled that you saw the discussuion regarding this screen on Home-Barista already, but maybe some others see this the first time.
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