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Thread: Double Filtered - Plunger and Filter

  1. #1
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    Double Filtered - Plunger and Filter

    I drink coffee mainly prepared as espresso but I make the occasional pour-over and I use Aeropress at work. I find the Aeropress coffee a bit rough around the edges most of the time, probably I haven't found the right grind/dosage yet. The pour-overs are very yummy but a bit light for my taste.
    To my surprise, one day when I was bored and I was jumping from one youtube coffee video to another I saw this novel way of preparing coffee (for me) .
    It works well for light roasts and good quality beans, I particularly like what I get from the Geisha variety or a quality African bean.

    Basically it's a very long French press brew ended by filtering the result through a V60 paper filter. Since the light roasted geisha coffees cannot be over-extracted, I start with 40 grams of ground coffee at a grind somewhere in between Aeropress and French press. I put the coffee in a smallish French press, pour 400 grams of boiling water over it and give it a good stir. I leave it to brew for 5 minutes then I give it another stir then leave it for 5 more minutes.
    After 10 minutes have passed the grounds are pretty much all resting at the bottom of the French press. I then press the plunger lightly to about 1 cm below the surface of the coffee and slowly pour the brewed coffee through a large V60 to filter it.

    The result is a very nice coffee, kinda like a syrupy, concentrated pour-over. It's slowly becoming my favorite way of preparing coffee but it's really going through a lot of coffee really quickly .

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    That method sounds really interesting!
    BalthazarG likes this.

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    Senior Member trentski's Avatar
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    Wouldn't it be cold by then?

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    No, it's not cold. In fact I find it's almost at the right temperature to drink from, I just give it a couple more minutes to cool off some more and get a bit more balance. My "high quality" IKEA sourced French press has some plastic insulation underneath that probably helps keeping it hot.
    At the moment I have a blend of Yemen and Colombia La Esperanza Geisha that is really tasty prepared this way .

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    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    (moved this discussion from BeanBay Banter to it's own thread so it doesn't get buried in the Knock-Box next month)

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    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Interesting method, might have to try it. When I make French press my brew time is up around 7-8min. When you start with just boiled water and a preheated French press this works well and the temp is perfect when it's time to drink.
    It's interesting that you find Aeropress 'rough round the edges'. What filter do you use and what ratio are you using? I find the Aeropress gives me the cleanest cup of all my soft brew options, but only with certain filters and it can be a bit unforgiving to mistakes.

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    Senior Member BalthazarG's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trentski View Post
    Wouldn't it be cold by then?
    No, I'd say all "quality" French Press (whatever that means) have pretty good insulation, Trentski. However, if it's a legitimate concern, you may want to pick the stainless steel option.

    As to whether SS actually contains the heat more effectively in reality is anybody's guess, but I'm sure you couldn't go wrong with it.

    My "high quality" IKEA sourced French press has some plastic insulation underneath that probably helps keeping it hot.
    Had a chuckle. I'm sure either a classic Bodum, a high-end Frieling, an indie Espro, or a utilitarian IKEA module are all capable of making great plunger coffee.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    It's interesting that you find Aeropress 'rough round the edges'. What filter do you use and what ratio are you using? I find the Aeropress gives me the cleanest cup of all my soft brew options, but only with certain filters and it can be a bit unforgiving to mistakes.
    It may be because I'm using the Able Standard metal filter. I might try the paper filters again if I ever find them after the last spring cleaning.

    I don't measure the ratio to precisely, I use one spoon of beans (the spoon that came with the AP) and fill the Aeropress with hot water to about 1 cm from the top. I get enough pitying glances from people at work when they see me hand grinding. I don't want to learn their reaction when they see me weighting the beans and measuring the water temperature as well .

    Anyway, the grind I use is slightly courser than an espresso grind. I use the inverted AP method. I put the ground coffee in, pour water over it, give it a good stir, wait 2 minutes then press the plunger. I find that the result is quite often (and depending on the roast) slightly too bitter.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roburu View Post
    It may be because I'm using the Able Standard metal filter. I might try the paper filters again if I ever find them after the last spring cleaning.

    I don't measure the ratio to precisely, I use one spoon of beans (the spoon that came with the AP) and fill the Aeropress with hot water to about 1 cm from the top. I get enough pitying glances from people at work when they see me hand grinding. I don't want to learn their reaction when they see me weighting the beans and measuring the water temperature as well .

    Anyway, the grind I use is slightly courser than an espresso grind. I use the inverted AP method. I put the ground coffee in, pour water over it, give it a good stir, wait 2 minutes then press the plunger. I find that the result is quite often (and depending on the roast) slightly too bitter.
    Sounds like you are over-extracting the coffee. If you grind just coarser than espresso, use quite a lot of water (relative to ground coffee) and then give it 2 minutes brew time......it will be bitter.

    I use what I suspect is a similar grind to you, but use 20g of coffee, with the plunger set in the middle of the Number 3 (inverted method), and brew for approx 70 seconds after fitting the filter disc and inverting. I boil the kettle and pour into ceramic kettle just as I start hand-grinding....drop the temperature sufficiently by the time I'm ready to brew.

    A 2 minute brew is fine if you grind coarser.
    DesigningByCoffee and roburu like this.

  10. #10
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roburu View Post
    It may be because I'm using the Able Standard metal filter. I might try the paper filters again if I ever find them after the last spring cleaning.

    I don't measure the ratio to precisely, I use one spoon of beans (the spoon that came with the AP) and fill the Aeropress with hot water to about 1 cm from the top. I get enough pitying glances from people at work when they see me hand grinding. I don't want to learn their reaction when they see me weighting the beans and measuring the water temperature as well .

    Anyway, the grind I use is slightly courser than an espresso grind. I use the inverted AP method. I put the ground coffee in, pour water over it, give it a good stir, wait 2 minutes then press the plunger. I find that the result is quite often (and depending on the roast) slightly too bitter.
    As Barry said you could be over extracting your Aeropress. Conventional wisdom would suggest so and Barry's method is worth a try. However I've been interested to see that a few of the world's well known coffee boffins are now saying that some of the parameters they initially thought were important for soft brew may not be at all. One is water temperature at the start and the other is long extraction times. The thinking is that you can't ruin the taste by brewing with water just off the boil and temperature is more important when the drink is being consumed than when it's being made. Also they're saying that you can't overextract when brewing with low or no pressure. Extraction essentially hits a ceiling and stays there, so as long as you've got everything else right over extraction shouldn't be a problem.
    With that in mind I'd look at your other variables for improvement. I haven't used an Able filter, but I've used something similar and had a similar experience to you. I now only use either paper filters or my Kafeologic S Filter which is the finest metal mesh filter available and I'd suggest you try the same. While I agree that scales at work is a bit unnecessary maybe you could work out if you're using the right amount of water. Your AP scoop will give you about 15-16g of coffee. Start with a ratio of 1:15. This means you'll measure out about 220ml of water for your drink (take a plastic measuring cup to work maybe?). Use about 1/4 of your water for a 30sec 'preinfusion/bloom' followed by a good stir and the rest of the water being added with another good stir. Flip and press after a further 60sec.
    Drink up.
    Make adjustments to grind size, brew times or ratio if needed (based on results of course).
    Barry O'Speedwagon and roburu like this.

  11. #11
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    Thanks guys, I'll start by grinding courser and maybe use a bit less water and see how I go, hopefully I'll find the right balance of strong coffee without over-extraction.

  12. #12
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    Sounds like you are over-extracting the coffee. If you grind just coarser than espresso, use quite a lot of water (relative to ground coffee) and then give it 2 minutes brew time......it will be bitter.

    I use what I suspect is a similar grind to you, but use 20g of coffee, with the plunger set in the middle of the Number 3 (inverted method), and brew for approx 70 seconds after fitting the filter disc and inverting. I boil the kettle and pour into ceramic kettle just as I start hand-grinding....drop the temperature sufficiently by the time I'm ready to brew.

    A 2 minute brew is fine if you grind coarser.
    Very similar to my ratios BOS.
    Around 20g, between espresso and plunger grind, 2.5-3 water, inverted. But I give it a quick stir and plunge straight away. If it is too bitter - I grind a little coarser.

    I've found that using this method, I can get nice black filter style coffees even from my espresso roasted beans. Saves roasting extra batches for the occasional aeropress!
    Dimal likes this.

  13. #13
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    That's what I do too...

    Works fine...

    Mal.

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