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Thread: Good coffee on the road NOT

  1. #1
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    Good coffee on the road NOT

    So this guy reckons he has found the ideal travel coffee setup. UNSEALED 4X4 ISSUE 035
    Thousands of dollars (2 top quality 100 AH AGM batteries, DC/DC battery charger and battery monitor that I estimate approaches $2000) and at the end is a pod machine! Admittedly, the 12V system has other uses, and it does allow him to use a milk frother. However, there are other solutions for milk frothing like the Bellman steamer or a pump type frother. I'll stick with my Aeropress/Helor 101 kit thanks (soon to be supplemented on the next outback adventure, to Maralinga and the Anne Beadell Highway, with a trial of an Artisansmith Kalita wave type dripper and kettle.)
    Andy, Dimal and matth3wh like this.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Lovey's Avatar
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    I saw that this morning. It's a lot of money to spend to get a pod machine working in the sticks when you could have an aeropress or plunger and hand grinder for a tasty result. I liked the comment of "for such a comprehensive system, it really does take up bugger-all space". He must have space to spare in there.

  3. #3
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    Still...
    he would be the most popular guy at the camp spot and the pod machine is fast. I hope he is taking his nasty empty pod land-fill out of the bush when he leaves!

    Aeropress and a kettle for black coffee drinkers and the Bellman or Otto (Little Guy - RIP) for the fluffy milk crew is still the best combos for most travel.
    I toggle between a whole lot of different devices but those are always the top of the list.
    Otago likes this.

  4. #4
    Senior Member magnafunk's Avatar
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    If you're that rough and rugged shouldn't you be drinking cowboy coffee when you're out bush. Maybe even fresh roasted if you really want to impress your buddies CoffeeSnobs - BeanBay - Other Stuff - Hand Roaster and Green Beans - FREE FREIGHT
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Lovey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by magnafunk View Post
    If you're that rough and rugged shouldn't you be drinking cowboy coffee when you're out bush.
    He can't be that rough and rugged, he drives a Prado
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lovey View Post
    He can't be that rough and rugged, he drives a Prado
    ... and so does a field ecologist friend who regularly goes to places which are so far off the beaten track that most 4WDs cannot get there. He had a Nissan for 15+ years and the Prado is now 5+. He reckons the Prado can get to places his Nissan couldn't.

    My dad used to love to tell such 4WD snobs "Always remember that whatever outback road you are on a Holden Ute with a limited slip diff was on that road while it was being built".

    On the same subject, in 1987 I successfully took a Mazda E2200 LWB rear wheel drive diesel van from Alice to Perth Via Giles and the Warburton ranges (long before it was regarded as OK for non 4WDs). The trip included pulling a "bogged down to the axles" Land Cruiser out of a soft patch... he pulled off the sandy road for a pitstop and managed to get stuck. He was lucky - it was April and I did not see any other cars for the next day when I arrived at Warburton.

    Anyone can get to most places with care in almost any modern vehicle as long as there is enough ground clearance and fuel capacity - I added 10cm of the former and 110 extra litres of the latter before I started. Oh, and anyone can bog anything almost anywhere if they are an idiot. Thinking of a "know it all Texan" that bogged his Landrover on the service road of the Pt Hedland wharf's main conveyor belt - whilst more Holden utes were whizzing past the same stretch. We needed three small mobile cranes to haul him out as the first two failed to lift the heavy beast.

    TampIt
    PS I still reckon that guy's coffee could have been a lot better than an old pod.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Gavisconi007's Avatar
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    Yep, agreed TampIt.

    I used to go pretty much anywhere around Port Hedland and surrounding areas in my trusty Holden HZ sedan.

    Prado's will match most 4WDs on the market.

    Anyone who bogs a Landcruiser has no idea what they're doing.

    Let the tyres down and you can go most places with steady acceleration and a dose of common sense
    DesigningByCoffee likes this.

  8. #8
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gavisconi007 View Post
    Let the tyres down and you can go most places with steady acceleration and a dose of common sense
    And, there's the rub...

    Mal.
    jbrewster and magnafunk like this.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Magic_Matt's Avatar
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    Good coffee on the road NOT

    Flashback to skipping class to do fishtails on the gravel roads around the Huon valley in my parents' '84 Commodore single-spinner... Good times!

    [disclaimer: CoffeeSnobs probably does not promote dangerous driving or being an idiotic teenager]

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magic_Matt View Post
    Flashback to skipping class to do fishtails on the gravel roads around the Huon valley...
    Yeah, I've taken a few "entry level" rental cars out in that part of the world, good fun. Only one "incident of note", took a wrong turn and found myself on a very narrow, very steep road, with a mountain on one side and not a lot on the other, kept going up in case it got any better but it was just getting worse, so I had to very gingerly reverse about 150m down the track and around a bend to get the car back out.

    Oh, and the first year I went down there somebody ran into me in Hobart on my way back to the airport, fortunately she didn't hit that hard so there was no real damage.

    Also had my first experience of traction control in that area, when the car I'd rented didn't want to go up the (admittedly rather steep) hill on the way into the place I stay at down there, then I found the off button

  11. #11
    Senior Member Magic_Matt's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Quote Originally Posted by jbrewster View Post
    Yeah, I've taken a few "entry level" rental cars out in that part of the world, good fun. Only one "incident of note", took a wrong turn and found myself on a very narrow, very steep road, with a mountain on one side and not a lot on the other, had to very gingerly reverse about 150m down the track and around a bend to get the car back out.

    Oh, and the first year I went down there somebody ran into me in Hobart on my way back to the airport, fortunately she didn't hit that hard so there was no real damage.
    Haha, standard Hobart driver...

    Also took me back to the GPS sending us up a twisting mountain pass in rural France... as we went further, it got narrower, steeper, rockier and the drop-off on each hairpin more terrifying... I came to the point of considering that if there was a locked gate at the top, we would have to abandon the hire car (Fiat 500 3-door) and walk out as there was no way I could ever turn if around, and attempting to reverse down would inevitably end in our fiery deaths.

    Eventually it levelled out and we drove into a deserted town that looked exactly as it must've in 1500 AD. Everyone was sleeping (it was early afternoon); eventually we found a guy painting his porch. Our Frenvh was fine in Paris, but in the massif central nobody could understand a word, and few people spoke any English. We managed to communicate where we were going, but when we pointed to where we had come from he actually went white... "la vieille rue???!!"
    Lukemc likes this.

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