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Thread: Sunbeam EM6910 Pressure gauge??

  1. #1
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    Sunbeam EM6910 Pressure gauge??

    Hi all, Hubby and I are new owners of a sunbeam EM6910 and are so far impressed. The only thing I cannot find info on currently is where the ideal position is for the pressure gauge when pouring a shot? Is it just personal preference?

  2. #2
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Ignore the pressure gauge, it's useless.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    Ignore the pressure gauge, it's useless.
    G'day LeroyC

    Not quite useless - they almost always give you a consistent reading. Once you work out where you like your coffee on that machine, the pressure gauge is a "quick and dirty guide" to repeat the taste as you alter beans, roast etc. It can save you a lot of time and grief "down the track".

    The danger is when some well intentioned person tells you their perfect coffee is at (say) "2 o'clock". That is meaningless for your machine (unless the stars happen to align at the same setting - looking upwards for pigs...).

    The time saving is why all "professional commercial" machines have a gauge (which can be as far out as those on a 6910, even when compared to identical machines). A second reason is more primal - it gives strong hint that all is not well and the machine needs TLC in some form or another.

    TampIt
    PS: I currently have 5 machines here and the gauges would vary by a range of about 2 o'clock - which is where my subconscious probably hooked that figure. Knowing the machine in front of you means the gauge is incredibly useful. Also, when I set up a cafe I take one of my Varios "preset" so I can setup their machine properly before I attack their grinder. Once again, their gauge saves bulk time.
    level3ninja, Erimus and gordons like this.

  4. #4
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TampIt View Post
    G'day LeroyC

    Not quite useless - they almost always give you a consistent reading. Once you work out where you like your coffee on that machine, the pressure gauge is a "quick and dirty guide" to repeat the taste as you alter beans, roast etc. It can save you a lot of time and grief "down the track".

    The danger is when some well intentioned person tells you their perfect coffee is at (say) "2 o'clock". That is meaningless for your machine (unless the stars happen to align at the same setting - looking upwards for pigs...).

    The time saving is why all "professional commercial" machines have a gauge (which can be as far out as those on a 6910, even when compared to identical machines). A second reason is more primal - it gives strong hint that all is not well and the machine needs TLC in some form or another.

    TampIt
    PS: I currently have 5 machines here and the gauges would vary by a range of about 2 o'clock - which is where my subconscious probably hooked that figure. Knowing the machine in front of you means the gauge is incredibly useful. Also, when I set up a cafe I take one of my Varios "preset" so I can setup their machine properly before I attack their grinder. Once again, their gauge saves bulk time.
    Totally agree Tampit and that's exactly what I was hoping you'd write to make up for me being too lazy to do so. ;-)

  5. #5
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    Yes I used one of these for a while and found pressure gauge gave me consistent readings for my machine but was always different to what other CS'ers mentioned on here.

    Great machine, parts wear out quite quickly but that is why it is cheap. Great bang for buck.
    LeroyC likes this.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by yoshjosh1985 View Post
    Yes I used one of these for a while and found pressure gauge gave me consistent readings for my machine but was always different to what other CS'ers mentioned on here.

    Great machine, parts wear out quite quickly but that is why it is cheap. Great bang for buck.
    G'day yoshjosh1985

    I was going to let the old "6910's wear out quickly" go through to the keeper. Then a "never seen before" 6910 hit my bench a few days ago.

    Massive amounts of those "coffee machine cleaner tablet / powders" had been put through the poor defenceless thing (the taste & smell of the water out of it was really, really strong). The rest of the machine was actually close to pristine.

    Pity they had not unscrewed & cleaned the showerscreens - which were more packed with old coffee grounds than any other machine I've ever seen (including commercial horrors from my distant past). Why SB don't put basic showerscreen maintenance in their manual is an enduring mystery to me. How water managed to get through those showerscreens at all I do not know. A thorough clean & scrub with dishwashing detergent and the showerscreens are still quite stained and discoloured with obviously ingrained grounds in the top showerscreen (the hardest one to clean). I could work my way through my "coffee cleaning chemicals" and fix them, however I really needed something to try out my new toy... I am awaiting an ultrasound cleaner and those filthy showerscreens will be a good initial torture test for it.

    Luckily I have a couple of spare 6910 showerscreens so after a "white vinegar descale" - mainly to get rid of the excess cleaner taste - followed by 6 litres of rainwater flushing to get rid of the vinegar water taint I tried a coffee shot plus a microfoam attempt. Plenty of power, brilliant coffee shot (better than my 7000 using the same batch of coffee) and pretty good microfoam. I had significantly underestimated the steam power, totally my bad for "take one" on the milk wand.

    The only issue this machine still has is the need for a single spacer between the grouphead and the seal as the collar has a tad of very even wear - not even two spacers worth, it doesn't even leak during a shot.

    Curiosity won - I checked the makers date.

    Not bad for a late (week 39) 2007 machine... That is actually the oldest 6910 I have seen so far.

    Takeaway: ANY machine that is kept pretty clean and maintained well will last quite a long time. There was not even a speck of grounds or discolouration in the seal, or anywhere else other than the showerscreens. Treat the machine like rubbish and get coffee grounds into the seal and any machine will endure a premature death and give you poor coffee into the bargain (karma for the mistreatment?).

    TampIt
    PS: I will do my usual and use it for a week as my main machine to check its consistency out and then off it goes to a local charity. Some poor deserving soul is going to get very lucky...
    rawill, LeroyC and level3ninja like this.

  7. #7
    Rbn
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    Tampit, still working your magic I see. Great work.

    Just bought another 6910. How do I read the serial number to see how old it is.

    I was told it was 10 years old, looks newer than my "10" year old one.
    Only issue I see is the steam starts well, maybe drops a little, then goes well again.
    I ran a strong vinegar solution through it just incase, might do that again.

    Shower head looks clean from the outside.
    Never took it off, maybe tomorrow!


    Robin

  8. #8
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    On the sticker on the grey plastic panel behind the door there will be a 3 digit number stamped into it.

    First digit is the last number of the build year, next two are the build week.

    Eg. 733. Built in the 33rd week of 2007.

    Once they were produced after 2010, the number changed to 4 digits. The first two digits now indicate the build year.

  9. #9
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    Thx Noidle22

    I only just logged on and you saved me the trouble of describing the dating.

    Enjoy your cuppa - all else is secondary for CS'r's.

    G'day Robin

    Yep, take those showerscreens off. You may have a rude shock - I did with this one.

    BTW, it is still my "on bench machine" - working brilliantly and solid as a rock. Anyone would like this one (apart from the racket it makes in use - a noisy but clearly "good reliable noise").

  10. #10
    Rbn
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    Many thanks, 527.
    So July 2005.

    An oldie, hopefully a goodie! Too big for my campervan so it might end up at my daughters after I have "fully tested it".
    Maybe a 5800 for the campervan, a small step up from a 4800c (476 on sticker-maybe means week 47-2006)

    My reasoning is that the lower spec models have the espresso/steam knob on the front.
    The heat transfers into the fitting and degrades it.
    Whereas the 5800 has the steam knob on the side like the 5600 and the heat does not get to the fitting in the same way, hence it can not be degraded in the same way.

    I have pulled my 4800 apart and saw browning of the white control unit, and the knob was getting hard to turn, that being the reason for pulling it apart.

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