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Thread: Upgrading my Silvia V2, to bring it to V5 standards. Thoughts?

  1. #1
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    Upgrading my Silvia V2, to bring it to V5 standards. Thoughts?

    In a week, it's my Silvia's 10th birthday. I would like to reward her by updating her to match the current V5. This would involve:

    * New steam wand assembly (V3) $110
    * Steam knob (V3), optional. I prefer the V2 knob
    * V4 has a new boiler, but I believe the only benefit to it is that it introduces a removably heating element, unlike the integrated element of the V2. No improvements in performance. Only worth upgrading when my V2 element dies. No reason to upgrade it before then. $200
    * Boiler Insulation (V5). Already have. $0
    * New chassis to replace my rust bucket $140

    Total cost: 250 now, $450 once the element dies.

    So- Have I included all changes that's happened between the V2 and V5? Is it worth putting the money into the old girl, or fdo I just accept that she's slowly on the decline?

    I've been off the coffee scene for a long time, so I'm not up to date with how much things are worth, and whether the Silvia is still considered to be a decent machine

  2. #2
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    If we're talking cheap upgrades (I've also got a V2), a vst basket will make a world of difference, as will a fitted tamp if you haven't done so already.

  3. #3
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    Already got a VST, naked portafilter and Reg Barber tamper. I'm not asking about what upgrades to make but just whether it's sensible to upgrade V2 components to V5- and whether I identified all of the changes over the years. There's not a great deal of info on what changed with each generation

    I've got no idea what the used marked to a V5 is these days, and I've got no idea whether I'll be sitting on a ticking time bomb even after upgrading the boiler and steam valve. I'd hate to spend a while bunch of money, only to learn that old Silvias are full of components that tend to fail

  4. #4
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    Tricky question.
    At a certain point changes make little difference. Is your dear Silvia making good coffee for you. Will a new steam wand make a difference. Interest to know why the chassis is rusted out? $200 is not excessive but a replacement boiler plus other items would add up to half the cost of a new one. Bit like a old car, it shifts from functional to a hobby.
    Not being negative these are just my thoughts. I sold my 2005 Silvia last year, she was still going well. I put new feet on her and cleaned up the chassis. The boiler was the original one.

  5. #5
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    I'm still skeptical. If you use the steam arm then upgrade that. I don't see the newer boiler making much of a difference. Depending on how bad the rust on the chassis is you might be able to just sand it back and paint the one you already have. A knobs a knob for the most part, I like the newer one better but if you don't then as I see it, there's no real point in upgrading. As far as insulating the boiler I think the bimetallic thermostats they use are more of a problem than heat loss from the boiler.

    Just my two cents.

  6. #6
    Senior Member artman's Avatar
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    As above. If you find the non ball jointed steam arm annoying then upgrade it. I would wait til element fails before swapping the boiler.

    Fix the rust so it doesn't continue to degrade (or swap for new if too far gone) and get a pid kit. That will give you most potential for shot improvement.

    They are a simple machine. If something fails, replace it then. Unless you just want to tinker and explore?

    Cheers

  7. #7
    Senior Member ozscott's Avatar
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    There is an excellent sealing product called Xtroll Rust Conquerer UV. I highly recommend that if you rub it back. Cheers

  8. #8
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    Thank you all very much for your opinions. I'm putting a PID high on the priority list now. Unfortunately the chassis is too far gone for a repair though

    Any idea if the Auber PID kit "pre infusion" function would work with a rotary pump? I'll be sticking a rotary pump in soon because I have one laying about the house. not plumbed-in
    Last edited by hugz; 12th August 2017 at 11:02 AM.

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