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Thread: from manual to semi-automatic buying advice

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Question from manual to semi-automatic buying advice

    I am looking at purchasing my first espresso machine and grinder within a $1500 price range.

    Currently, I use a Porlex hand grinder and an Aeropress or Chemex. I buy beans weekly from local roasters in Melbourne. I want to start making espresso (with milk) at home. Will only be making 2 cups per day. My kitchen isn't huge, so the inbuilt grinder is a bit of a drawcard but would prefer quality over convenience.

    After a bit of searching I thought one of the below might suit my needs, but would appreciate any recommendations, tips, veto etc.

    Lelit Combi with PID // $1249 with inbuilt grinder

    Rancillio Silvia // without PID $849.00
    - with PID is an extra $500, which might not fit into my budget depending on the grinder

    Breville The Dual Boiler Espresso Machine // $799


    Grinders

    BARATZA SETTE 270 // $449
    Compak K3 // $550

  2. #2
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    You will get great coffee out of a breville dual boiler and a compak k3. There are often great grinders and machines on here for under your budget too. Happy shopping

  3. #3
    Senior Member WhatEverBeansNecessary's Avatar
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    Personally I would stick away from the appliance machines like Breville & sunbeams etc. They can make good coffee but often don't have the life span, resale value or the build quality (on average).

    Haven't used the Lelit or Silvia but i hear good things from both. If you want a demo see if you can drop by one of the sponsors and they are usually happy to run you through the basics of each and offer very competitive prices!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by WhatEverBeansNecessary View Post
    Personally I would stick away from the appliance machines like Breville & sunbeams etc. They can make good coffee but often don't have the life span, resale value or the build quality (on average).
    Personally I agree with the above advice. I do wonder whether there are hidden issues such as whether the people who buy appliance machines are less likely to do recommended servicing such as replace the water filter every two months etc. Perhaps the people who buy Italian machines are more likely to take them back to the dealer for a yearly service. I expect Breville and Sunbeam would have an indication from the quantity of consumables they sell.
    My first Breville Bes870 died at three years and on reflection I know I only replaced the water filter every year because everything looked fine. I now have a better understanding of water quality in espresso machines.

  5. #5
    Rbn
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    Personally I don't agree with the above advice. Bang for buck, it seems to me that Sunbeam EM6910/7000, are hard to beat. About longevity. How about $200.00 max spent in repairs on a machine built in 2007, and having pulled over 10,000 shots. That is my experience. I have seen some "proffessional machines" on here, where people spent 2500, on repairs, on a machine that cost that much new, and all in 7-8 years.

    Maybe I got lucky with mine I don't know.
    But a couple of thermal fuses, magnetic water sensor, new collar, and a steam thermoblock when i bought it already with 7000 shots on it and a blocked thermoblock as it had never been descaled.

    But, others have not had the same good life out of their machines as I have.
    Just saying.
    gordons likes this.

  6. #6
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    I agree the EM 6910 is such a good machine for the $400 new price tag. If you want milk with your coffee it is the way to go as you can steam your milk while the shot is pulling. Also the less automated it is the less things to break! My 2nd hand 6910 was built in 2007 and with some minor tweaks it's going really well
    rawill likes this.

  7. #7
    Rbn
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    However, I guess we should say that some say, the earlier 6910 machines are better than the later ones.
    Both my 6910s are 2007, My 7000 2014.
    One 6910 is on its way to my daughter, the one that has the new collar, and has done 10,000 shots.
    So for a new unit, frankly I dont really know.
    Perhaps a 7000 with fingers crossed!
    But like so much stuff it has become "more electronic".

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