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Thread: Copper pipe repair

  1. #1
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    Copper pipe repair

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi all,

    I have a BFC Junior Extra. It is a brilliant machine which has worked excellently upuntol yesterday. I was adjusting the OPV to lower my brew pressure (as I prefer it at around 7.5/8 bars) and noticed that the previous owner linked a copper pipe. For some silly reason I tried to straighten the link and broke the copper pipe. On my machine the copper pipe goes from the solenoid to the boiler the. To the OPV. It has a T joint in the middle to make it three ways.

    As as it turns out, it looks as though I can not simply buy a replacement copper pipe and connection, so it looks like I will be attempting to fabricate it myself.

    There are three compression joints on the end of the copper pipes that join to the relevant parts. These look like this but attach to 1/4 pipe - https://www.espressocare.com/product...red-nipple-8mm

    I have successfully purchased two of the compression joints (the one to the solenoid and other to the OPV) however the one that joins to the boiler is slightly smaller and the shop I went to today (coffee parts - sponspored store) did not have that size.

    Does anyone have have any ideas for me in finding the parts in or around Sydney. Or has anyone undertaken a similar job like this in the past with advice.

    See below the part part I am trying to replicate (noting the middle connector is smaller than the ones on the end




    Cheers Ed

  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    No big deal. I solder refrigeration copper pipe often.
    Flare the pipe ends slightly so you have a lip for the solder to sit in, and solder the replacement in.
    Ideally, the pipe should just slide into the other and you solder to secure it.

  4. #4
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    If the original compression fittings are silver soldered onto the pipe(s) You can simply reheat (propylene gas heat gun) them till the solder melts away and remove them, reinstall onto the new fabricated pipe fitting.
    I'd strongly suggest that you take pics and measurements of all in-situ before removing cutting re-fabricating etc.

    BTW are you adjusting Brew Pressure down to suit a Light Roast? Or ?

  5. #5
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    You can get silver solder at bunnings. I think its the brown end stuff. Get a map torch as well.

    But any plumber would be able to sort it out.
    As adventurer said,any fittings are removable, and reusable.

  6. #6
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    Thanks all, I have managed to fix it.

    Essentially, I went to Bunnings and Reece Plumbing to buy the materials. It was a little more complicated that expected as I needed to flare the copper pipe slightly to make a better fitting seal on the compression fittings. The flaring tool was the most expensive part of the job (at around $45). I then used plumbing flux and silver solding (lead free) to create water tight seals. I then sized and shaped the copper pipes (given it was a 3 pipe way this took some time and precision). I fitted it this afternoon and flushed a few litres of water ready for brew tomorrow morning.

    My recommendation before undertaking this job is not to break copper pipes on your machines in the first place. It is not the hardest job in the world, but not the easiest. There is always a moment of terror when testing the soldered joints under pressure. Thankfully not a drop.

    The reason for adjusting my brew pressure was because I prefer a lower brew pressure. A few weeks before I experimented by upping it to bang on 9 bars. I found that the margin of error was too small (easy to overextract). In my experience, 7.5/8 creates a consistently smooth mid roast brew. Additionally, my BFC manometer “green range is from 7/8 bars. This does seem odd in itself. Does anyone know why this is, given recommended brew pressure is typically 9 bars.

  7. #7
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    If you back purge the pipe when you solder it, it won't make that black flaky stuff inside the pipe. Fridge guys use nitrogen, but I have used argon (as I have it and not nitrogen). Result- clean copper inside.

    Good you got it sorted.
    Dimal likes this.

  8. #8
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    Ed Re pump pressure question towards the end of yopur post #6.
    To save complicating this thread with another subject post up the same question in another thread.
    Maybe under general coffee discussion.
    Also do a search of CS it is a common discussion.
    GL with your coffee
    EA

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by EspressoAdventurer View Post
    Ed Re pump pressure question towards the end of yopur post #6.
    To save complicating this thread with another subject post up the same question in another thread.
    Maybe under general coffee discussion.
    Also do a search of CS it is a common discussion.
    GL with your coffee
    EA
    Thanks will do, I have been curious about it.



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