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Thread: Sulawesi Blue

  1. #1
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    Sulawesi Blue

    Just a quick note to say... how bloody good is this bean?!
    loving it. Also just loving roasting... it's so much fun and rewarding.

  2. #2
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    Way back Naked Bean Albany used to source this bean. One trip south I had a "tea drinking / never coffee" friend in his 50's with me. After sampling it, he bought $850 worth of similar coffee gear from them "on the spot" to be able to make it for himself at home (Wembley). Yep, one of the "unknown greatest beans" especially when light / medium roasted. Gonna have to get some to refresh my memory.

  3. #3
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Too true - the old Sul Blue is a staple here
    GrahamK and topshot like this.

  4. #4
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    I'm keen to try some Indo beans, not sure whether to go with the Sulawesi Blue, or the Aceh Danau Laut Tawar. We drink both pour over (black) and Soy Milk espresso. Any recommendations on which to start with?
    A coffee shop on my morning commute who only roast Indonesian beans suggested i start with a Java bean, Geographically it's smack bang in the middle of these two on offer from Beanbay..

    So many beans, so little time.

  5. #5
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Been using the Sulawesi Blue for a while now and love them, great as a component in a blend or as a single origin. I love it as a long black!!
    Dimal, shewey and 338 like this.

  6. #6
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    I like this one too.

    The amount of chaff produced is almost zero and it is easy to,roast.

  7. #7
    Senior Member gonzob's Avatar
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    Yeah.

    Nice. I started roasting it lighter, but I prefer it at about CS9. Excellent for long blacks - I agree. I do have to keep tightening the grind as the beans get older (not that there's any left beyond 2 weeks)

    Gonzo

  8. #8
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    I've just done the Sulwesi Blue as a faster ramp (more like I would for an Ethiopian Harrar) and dropped just before second crack, and got a much sweeter, more tangy / less earthy, surprisingly fruity espresso than I would have expected for this bean.
    Who'd have thunk it!
    Dimal and chokkidog like this.

  9. #9
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    Hi guys, Andy's notes say "bit of heat early followed by tapering off" something like that. My question is, relative to a Behmor Is dropping from 100% to 75% or 75% to 50% considered a taper. My experience is anything less than 100 % reduces first crack to rice bubbles even with a reduced bean load, and dropping to less than 75% at first crack results in stalling on a cold day. How do other Behmor roasters overcome a tapering profile. Chippy
    Last edited by chippy; 18th September 2017 at 04:03 PM. Reason: missing numbers

  10. #10
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    "rice bubbles" first crack is fine. You don't have to have a violent crack to produce great coffee, some profiles that work really well with a particular bean will produce hardly any noise so don't get hung-up on that indicator.

    Heat early on this is mostly due to the higher moisture. A quick "zap" seems to equalise the beans then the longer profile lets them develop into the rich, heavy cocoa bomb they can be but as mentioned above by DesigningByCoffee, a faster, lighter roast will totally change the result in the cup.

    Have a play, take lots of notes and then taste it! You will find what works best for your tastes and have your own baseline for something you want. Chasing others results will just drive you crazy.

  11. #11
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    Hi Andy. Just go to my first bag of SB. Using a Behmor can I ask how you would define the ‘quick zap’ of heat?

    P.S. I Normally do a 90 sec preheat prior to roasting then run a P2 profile.

  12. #12
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    Hmmm. Not sure they are meant to look like this. 100g batch using the Behmor preheated for 90 sec. Started at 100% for about 2:30. Then dropped to 75% for till just before FC. Then 50% till about 1:00 after FC. Came out as uneven a roast as I could ever get. Too much tinkering with the heat?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    (I'm reacting to a picture... so take it with a grain of salt. Only you can tell us what they actually taste like)

    They look way underdone and I doubt much of it made it to first crack as they are looking like "pan fried beans" not roasted. I expect these will taste like grass/wheat/hay if your grinder can even grind them and will probably be lemon sour too.

    1: Preheat - I don't like it in the Behmor. I know some on here do but I think it's just not needed and for a newbie, it just confuses the starting point.
    2: 100g sucks. Yes, it is "do able" but you have such a low volume of beans and no residual heat build-up so your temperature changes are over dramatic.
    3: yes, too much fiddling with heat when the bean wasn't ready for a heat change.
    4: Beans might have been cooked too fast too, think gentle roasting, not searing a steak.

    Instead try this:

    200g of beans
    [200 / P2 / Start]
    When you hear first crack (not the very first pop, wait till you hear 5 or more)
    Press [P3] manual (50% heat) and press [C] to reset the timer.

    It should be pretty close to right by the end of the time but keep an eye on them and press [cool] if they are getting too dark. You should be aiming not to hear second crack.
    Remember the roaster doesn't know how dark the beans are, only you can stop a bean ignition.

    The manual P3 above is a best guess at this time of year. In the middle of summer you might only need 25% heat to finish the roast, on a really cold day outside you might need 75%

    Take lots of notes on what you do during a roast, add taste comments later and in no time you will find the profiles that suit the bean and your tastes.

  14. #14
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    Thanks Andy. I don’t think I’ll even try to taste them. There is no pleasant aromas coming from the bag after several days so can’t imagine them tasting any good.

    That process you suggest is pretty much the same as I’ve had success with other beans. Keeping it simple obviously the best approach. I’ll give that a go and let you know the outcome.

  15. #15
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    Taste them!
    Really.

    You should at least try and taste all your roasts, you might love them (I doubt it) but you will also imprint the taste of that error in roasting. Add those to your roasting notes so you can see what you did in the roast that didn't work.

    Too light, too dark both need to be tasted so you have an internal reference to compare against other roasts. Sometimes you will get slight "grassy" aftertaste in a roast and will know that you were leaning a little light or a little fast on that roast, obviously, BBQ flavours creeping in might mean you had some scorching or over roasting and you can adjust to suit. It's great to taste very light and very dark beans to give yourself "bookends" of the flavour scale.

    As for starting point...

    Rule of thumb is that your own good baseline is correct for all Arabica beans.

    ...you then adjust the roast to target something in the bean or something that your own tastes prefer.

  16. #16
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    Taste them!
    Really.

    You should at least try and taste all your roasts, you might love them (I doubt it) but you will also imprint the taste of that error in roasting. Add those to your roasting notes so you can see what you did in the roast that didn't work.

    Too light, too dark both need to be tasted so you have an internal reference to compare against other roasts. Sometimes you will get slight "grassy" aftertaste in a roast and will know that you were leaning a little light or a little fast on that roast, obviously, BBQ flavours creeping in might mean you had some scorching or over roasting and you can adjust to suit. It's great to taste very light and very dark beans to give yourself "bookends" of the flavour scale.

    As for starting point...

    Rule of thumb is that your own good baseline is correct for all Arabica beans.

    ...you then adjust the roast to target something in the bean or something that your own tastes prefer.
    Agreed, taste everything! Even if you know you botched it it's absolutely worth trying, just to understand the effects of roasting too light/dark.

    And yes you may be surprised and stumble across something you really like, even if others don't!

  17. #17
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    Another go and followed Andy's suggestions. Definite improvement this time though still a bit uneven. Much more pleasant aroma straight out of the roaster. Give 5 or so days and then first taste test.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by arcachon; 2 Weeks Ago at 05:42 PM.

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