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Thread: Sulawesi Blue

  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Sulawesi Blue

    Just a quick note to say... how bloody good is this bean?!
    loving it. Also just loving roasting... it's so much fun and rewarding.

  2. #2
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    Way back Naked Bean Albany used to source this bean. One trip south I had a "tea drinking / never coffee" friend in his 50's with me. After sampling it, he bought $850 worth of similar coffee gear from them "on the spot" to be able to make it for himself at home (Wembley). Yep, one of the "unknown greatest beans" especially when light / medium roasted. Gonna have to get some to refresh my memory.

  3. #3
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Too true - the old Sul Blue is a staple here
    GrahamK likes this.

  4. #4
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    I'm keen to try some Indo beans, not sure whether to go with the Sulawesi Blue, or the Aceh Danau Laut Tawar. We drink both pour over (black) and Soy Milk espresso. Any recommendations on which to start with?
    A coffee shop on my morning commute who only roast Indonesian beans suggested i start with a Java bean, Geographically it's smack bang in the middle of these two on offer from Beanbay..

    So many beans, so little time.

  5. #5
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Been using the Sulawesi Blue for a while now and love them, great as a component in a blend or as a single origin. I love it as a long black!!
    Dimal, shewey and 338 like this.

  6. #6
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    I like this one too.

    The amount of chaff produced is almost zero and it is easy to,roast.

  7. #7
    Senior Member gonzob's Avatar
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    Yeah.

    Nice. I started roasting it lighter, but I prefer it at about CS9. Excellent for long blacks - I agree. I do have to keep tightening the grind as the beans get older (not that there's any left beyond 2 weeks)

    Gonzo

  8. #8
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    I've just done the Sulwesi Blue as a faster ramp (more like I would for an Ethiopian Harrar) and dropped just before second crack, and got a much sweeter, more tangy / less earthy, surprisingly fruity espresso than I would have expected for this bean.
    Who'd have thunk it!
    Dimal and chokkidog like this.

  9. #9
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    Hi guys, Andy's notes say "bit of heat early followed by tapering off" something like that. My question is, relative to a Behmor Is dropping from 100% to 75% or 75% to 50% considered a taper. My experience is anything less than 100 % reduces first crack to rice bubbles even with a reduced bean load, and dropping to less than 75% at first crack results in stalling on a cold day. How do other Behmor roasters overcome a tapering profile. Chippy
    Last edited by chippy; 4 Days Ago at 04:03 PM. Reason: missing numbers

  10. #10
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    "rice bubbles" first crack is fine. You don't have to have a violent crack to produce great coffee, some profiles that work really well with a particular bean will produce hardly any noise so don't get hung-up on that indicator.

    Heat early on this is mostly due to the higher moisture. A quick "zap" seems to equalise the beans then the longer profile lets them develop into the rich, heavy cocoa bomb they can be but as mentioned above by DesigningByCoffee, a faster, lighter roast will totally change the result in the cup.

    Have a play, take lots of notes and then taste it! You will find what works best for your tastes and have your own baseline for something you want. Chasing others results will just drive you crazy.

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