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Thread: How I became a coffeesnob

  1. #101
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    my dad. how he introduced me to coffee when i was a kid. i woke up every morning to sit next to my dad getting breakfast and getting ready to work. then my oldest sister who is a stewardess for royal brunei airlines just came back with a package, a gift for my dad. a shiny new white plasticy coffee machine with the build in grinder. looking at him trying to figure out how to use the machine, making me more curious. i think thats how it got me started on my early life. :)

  2. #102
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by bolb link=1166962996/80#98 date=1217325709
    Great storey Raphec, you have gone through an interesting progression, i wonder when upgraditis will set in again?

    Mal
    Its not a question of when, its a question of when i can afford.... Building my first house has had a major effect on my cashflow, one i am still getting used to. So while pretty much everything i have to date has been money saving. I am finding it hard to save, and also to justify spending on new gear.

    As soon as i can find the spare cash, a new grinder is on the list, and I also keep scanning for a second hand commercial espresso machine that i can service and make like new again for a great price. The gf might kill me though, at least id die happy - "last requests?" "one more coffee please."

  3. #103
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    hi everyone

    i was online researching cafe romas and came across a link to CoffeeSnobs and well after lurking a couple of weeks or so researching i joined and started posting and ive pretty well finally decided on a first set up and thanks to members here im now going to be a lot poorer money wise :( but wealthier coffee wise starting out with some reasonable gear

    thinking of doing a baristas course in the next few weeks and by that time i should be in a position to purchase something to hone my new skills on

    i use a heatgun at work so might have to get a few roasts in I had a laugh, really looking forward to doing my own roasts though

    thanks to everyone for making a great site

    Banjo

  4. #104
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    welcome Banjo, its true, being a coffee snob can lead to spending lots of money, but good coffee is worth it. Also, can save you money on bought coffee, because the better the coffee at home, the less you will spend on coffee out.

  5. #105
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Welcome Banjo

    Barista course is a good idea, I did one but dont follow their method totally as i find it didnt fit my scenario of not having my grinder hopper full of ground coffee but it was aimed at professional level. Even so, it added to my overall knowledge.

    And Raphec is right, where we used to go for coffee at a local cafe we now just stay home as its more comfortable.
    If we go for breakfast somewhere on a weekend i make sure its to a local place i know makes good coffee.

    Mal

  6. #106
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    thanks for the welcome Raphec/Bolb

    i kind of thought i may be able to get away without doing one taking in regard the amount of info accessible these days and forums like CS but i will do one because ive had no hands on at this stage

    Banjo

  7. #107
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Not doing a course would be like learning to drive a car by reading a book.

  8. #108
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I think Ive been here for about an hour reading all these fabulous posts... ::) thought maybe i should put something in: but theres no way its gonna be as interesting!

    I studied modern art (going back nearly five years now) and at that time became fascinated with cafes (having spent so much time recovering from my wild artistic endeavours in them...) - i think it was the idea of cafes as meeting places, where IDEAS happen... all the artists throughout modern (1780s plus) art history came together in cafes where their artistic ideas became real works which became whole movements...

    did you know Wall street started out as a cafe? People met there to trade commodities because it was where all the bigwigs hung out... and did you know the brains behind the french revolution began in a humble cafe (which is apparently still there) where people met and (caffeine inspired) ideas flew around and bounced off people...

    Anyway, i started working for Gloria jeans to get an inside perspective... four years later and a visual art/criticism major later... still here... and why?

    BECAUSE I FREAKIN LOVE IT. Screw the arts... Coffee IS ART!!! 8-)

    Dunno if i qualify as a coffeesnob. But hopefully i will one day. ;)

  9. #109
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    My parents gave me a Russell Hobbs machine with filter on one side esspresso on the other, it blew up and electricuted, lasted 1 week with out an esspresso machine and has snowballed from there.

  10. #110
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    My first meetings with coffee happened when I was very young... My whole family liked coffee, so when us kids were eating icecream at the same time as our parents and grand parents were drinking coffee, we would get a spoon or two over it... But drinking coffee started later, in high school...

    Paying attention to coffe came some 10 years ago, when I noticed the difference between coffee in Italy, Germany, Austria and our country... I preferred Italian of course ( espresso ) and ours ( so to speak ). Where I live, it is common that at home people cook coffee ( I dont know how to explain this with english terms exactly ). We call it Turkish coffee, Greeks call it Greek coffee... You have several different ways, but the point is to cook coffee in a pot and thats it. Jou just need the coffee to be as finely grinded as it can be...

    But I started to appreciate good coffee when I first visited UK... *;)


  11. #111
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    For me, its been a very slow progression. Slow mainly because Ive never known a coffee snob, and am completely self (and interweb) taught.

    As a kid I preferred Nescafe to the more insipid Mellow Birds.
    In my late teens I was starting to turn my nose up if the instant coffee had to be prised off a lump at the bottom of the jar, and enjoyed the sniff of a freshly opened one.
    Spent most of my 20s drinking supermarket coffee through paper filters, with the occasional decent coffee in a cafe.
    Was given a Krups, which I ran for several years with supermarket coffee, preferably canned Illy.
    Thought about a better machine, then casual research indicated that the grinder was the thing to buy.
    Destroyed the seals on the old Krups within weeks of giving it properly ground coffee.
    I believe that the red pill was offered at some stage here.
    Mounted an intense interweb research project in 2004, before buying the Expobar.

    I was probably officially a coffeesnob about 4 weeks after buying the Expobar when I bought a thermocouple and started drilling out baskets.

  12. #112
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Like everyone else, I have an Arts digree!

  13. #113
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Growing up, I never gave much mind to how cofffee was served to me (cream, sugar, black, didnt matter!), but around the time I was 12 or so I bought a French press just because I liked messing about with stuff in the kitchen and it was a new and exciting toy compared to a drip machine. Also, as it required less work to use than a drip machine, I was hooked.

    However, as much as I did like coffee and drank it, I wasnt a fanatic and couldve probably gone the rest of my life without drinking it. Then, my mother bought a percolator around the time I was 18 or so, and I began to consider the merits of various coffee brewing techniques. I bought any type of machine I could find for cheap and compared each techniques coffee to the nexts. I tried standard paper-filter drip coffee, French press coffee, Italian Moka, espresso machine coffee and percolator coffee. I was still very open to any methods, but eventually I became hooked on percolator coffee.

    Drip coffee tastes too generic and bland for my liking, and French presses and Mokas gave the coffee more crema and sediment than I really like. Espresso machines were too much work for a simple cup of coffee, and so a percolator it was. In my opinion, the percolator gave just the right balance, didnt filter out any oils in the coffee or make it taste bland like drip machines, and it didnt leave much crema and sediment which detracted from it in my opinion. In all, its just the best way I think for a balanced, smooth cup of plain, black coffee.

    Since then, Ive become somewhat of a crusader fighting to bring plain, black coffee out of the shadows. For too long, coffee has been adultered and monkeyed around with to where what most people consider "coffee" is about as similar to coffee as a milkshake is to a glass of milk before bed, and the black coffee you find elsewhere is done with such poor techniques and using what I consider barbarous equipment that its either stale and flavourless or burnt, overly-strong and ruined.

    The real turning point came around six months ago whenever I finally had enough bad coffee that I snapped and became an overly-critical cynic living in a world filled with coffee-like beverages and improperly-made coffee.

  14. #114
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Welcome to CoffeeSnobs "EC"..... [smiley=thumbsup.gif]

    Youve definitely come to the right place if great coffee prepared properly is important to you. Enjoy your stay.... :)

    Mal.

  15. #115
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I live on the road and have coffee in lots of places.
    Some I go back to, some I dont.
    I like Boucla, Epic, Cafe Denada and the Bethesda hospital cafe [who cares about the coffee when youve got a view like that...]

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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    When did I become a coffee snob? It was about 12.40pm yesterday at a local fresh market where one of the stalls served coffee and brown beans. I had not only been bitten by the espresso perfection bug but also the roasting bug. (not that Ive done any yet, but anything that includes DIY gadgets and upgrades Im hooked)). I digress, Altho I had ordered the CS starter pack I was wondering if anyone local could supply a small quantity of green just to practice with whilst my order arrived, once I get bug bitten I get obssessed. the lady at the store mentioned that was the second time today that shed been asked that and wondered why the interest. I explained that I had started home brewing and that I was interested in roasting. Her reply was that I shouldnt even bother with home roasting as I wouldnt be able to time the roast right nor get anyware near the quality of the brown bean that they could supply. At that point right there I became the coffeesnob my happy demure changed to snobbery whilst I turned on my heals mid sentence as she was explaining how they ordered the coffee on Saturday it was roasted on Monday and supplied Friday. I barely heard the end of the sentence as the distance between me and the coffee shop slowly got greater and greater and never to be deminished. Altho true sobbery demands a bit of knowledge to back it up her attitude got the heckles on the neck right up.. Just as a visual all there beans are diplayed in open heshen bags that passers by are welcome to run the hands thru. EEk.

    Just wait until I actual know what Im doing god help the world.. ;D

    Kaff...

  17. #117
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Sounds like youll make a fine snob.

    I read your story to my wife and shes wondering if those beans in the sacks were green before all the fingers ran through them. :P

  18. #118
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I had coffee through my life. If you could call it coffee. If you are a member here you know exactly what I mean.

    I became lactose intolerent in my teens. Bad short blacks sometimes taste ok in milk. So I never really got into the coffee thing.

    Once I started shift work caffiene became a need. But you get very sick of Pepsi Max.
    My wife became friends with owners of a new local shop. The woman was an amazing cook. The bloke was even better barista. 2 out of every 3 shots he pulled were god shots. I got introduced to really really good short blacks.
    First came the stove top. Then the hand grinder. Then the wall grinder. But I knew I could not do what he could. At least I got an OK coffee at home.

    Disaster, they moved to Canada. They sold the store. The new owners took the store from good to average.
    Then came the Silvia and Rocky.

    A bloke at my misses work brought some beans he had roasted. Nice! I asked how he did it. He sent me the URL to the first Correto.
    And now I know my journey is just beggining!

  19. #119
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I could have sworn I did one of these when I first joined, but I guess I not!


    My first experience with coffee is a memory from my early childhood. I was at my Grandmas house for a family gathering and someone mucked up and passed me a cup of coffee (instant) rather than the milo I was meant to have. Needless to say I wasnt very impressed.

    Fast forward to my teenage years.

    Became good mates with a guy who was a few years older than me, and after our regular Friday night hang outs Id crash at his place. Saturday mornings consisted of a giant plate piled with Vegemite toast, and a cup of coffee (instant again) each, which I insisted I didnt drink but would gag down when told thats all that was on offer. Of course, over time I began to enjoy said coffees, and even began to make them myself when at home.

    My first coffee machine purchase was around the age of 20, when I bought a Krups machine from Harvey Norman with what I now recognise to be a pressurised pf and a rubber attachment for "foam enhancement". I now bought Vittoria pre ground coffee from Woolies and looked down my nose at anyone who tried to offer me instant.
    Layered Lattes were my way to impress the girls I bought home, ah - the joys of naivety!

    I moved in with my girlfriend at the time (now my wife) and since space was limited and the need to impress was gone, the Krups stayed at home. There was also the fact that it had started leaking.

    Fast forward another six months, and I decide its time to fix the Krups. A net search to find an internal diagram leads me to Coffee Geek and from there to CoffeeSnobs, where I read about the beauty of espresso and and the finer details of producing one. Obviously this stuck in my head, and whilst walking to work I drop into a cafe that has just opened for the morning. I was lucky enough to stumble into a place where the barista was passionate about his art, even if the cafe in question didnt use the freshest beans. He made the most amazing mouthful of molten coffee I had ever experienced. Different tastes crashed against each other in my mouth and I had an epiphany. That moment was the turning point.

    I visited Andy regularly, often getting two shots in the morning and one (or two depending on what kind of day I was having) through the day. I still remember coming into the shop one morning and when he saw me he ran up the stairs. I was a little confused until he came back down clasping a small container of beans that he had sourced from elsewhere to show me what he could do with fresh beans - what a legend!

    I spent some time visiting a roaster in Erskineville on a semi regular basis each Saturday while getting further into my snob journey, and with some suppliers from work offering me incentives as a little thankyou for continuing to use them through the year, I managed to pick up a Silvia and Rocky combo which lasted me four years.

    Present day sees Silvia replaced with a Domobar Super, and Rocky pending a replacement. Theyll both be moved on to new homes where they will be appreciated.

    The journey continues.


    Grant (working on that max character limit)

  20. #120
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    When I was little my mother used to by Cappuccinos because my bro and I would steal the milk foam off the top of it. Than all I wanted for my 10th birthday was an espresso machine. Thankfully after much convincing my parents bought me a Sunbeam EM4800 After many failed attempts my mum got a friend who worked in a cafe to come and teach me the art of espresso. It was pretty basic but it got me on my way. I still remember the confusion of what the crema was doing on top of the espresso even though I hadnt added milk.

    When I went to boarding, there was a master who worked in an espresso bar, of which the boss had donated a San Marino Lisa 2 group commercial espresso machine to the church this bloke was going to. Being the grand age of twelve, it opened my eyes to the world of coffee. Unfortunately this man left after my first year and I no longer went to that church.

    A few years on I was on my way past my favourite espresso bar when another person I had met at the church, who also taught me walked out, and he had bought this cafe. Consequently that was my first job in a cafe.

    Unfortunately my Sunbeam broke after a few years and I didnt have the money to buy a new one. But Iím happy with the Conti Twin Star at work.

    And thatís how this expensive but thouroughly enjoyable addiction started.

  21. #121
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by KoffeeKid link=1166962996/100#119 date=1231239918
    And thatís how this expensive but thoroughly enjoyable addiction started.
    Welcome KoffeeKid..... [smiley=thumbsup.gif]

    Youve certainly come to the right place to satisfy your [s]addiction[/s] [s]obsession[/s] interest ::) in all things coffee. Hope you have a lot of fun... :)

    By the way, theres no need for this hobby to become an expensive one and when it really comes right down to it, expensive really only applies if youre not getting the most out of what youve bought and you will certainly learn how to do that here ;)

    Cheers,
    Mal.

  22. #122
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I think it was in my genes. One of my earliest memories is in a local roaster and all things coffee supplier that my parents would buy their beans from. I remember the wonderful aroma...wow! I did not like coffee as a kid (my parents would let me take a sip), but I always jumped at the chance to go with them to buy beans because I loved that aroma.

    I always knew there was something special in it as I would watch my parents grind beans by hand and make stovetop espressos and then seem ever so satisfied while drinking it. The other adults around me were only drinking instant. Admittedly my parents would still accept instant when out and occasionally make it themselves - thats certainly not in my genes...not in my repertoire (excuse spelling) of behaviours at all.

    Once my palate began maturing and I was drinking coffee alongside my parents, I bought a cheap little plastic thermoblock machine. I was disappointed that it didnt make the coffees I wouldve liked but I was addicted and continued on as it was all I could afford.

    Eventually upgraded to a nice little Italian stainless steel domestic machine with brass boiler, group and portafilter. This was an amazing improvement on the previous machine but still wasnt quite there. Maybe there is something in what I had been reading on this site I had stumbled across way back then, CoffeeSnobs, about how a good grinder is all important.

    My sister bought a grinder and had the same machine as me. So,it was off to see my sister. Eureka! So, I was off to buy a grinder. Could only afford the EMO480, but what a difference! Now my preprogrammed snobbery could begin to thrive. (My parents obviously knew about the good grinder thing as they had a very expensive hand grinder and would spend the time and effort doing it...but I was obviously too slow to pick up on that part :-[)

    I now have a leverpull machine as I love to have as much involvement in making my shot as possible. I am still on quite base range equipment as I am basically a professional student and seem to only ever make myself enough money to keep living and studying more. That said, when the operator manages to pull off all of the variables, my europiccola can make an exceptional shot.

    Cant help but brag now - I finally pulled together enough $ for a Pullman tamper - basket is on its way there :).

    I have now finally joined CS as I move into the next part of the equation - home roasting. It was only through CS that I began my roasting career. Thanks guys and girls - especially Corretto.

    I also look forward to ongoing contributions to the Fair Crack fund via my BeanBay purchases. I love to know my purchase really is making a difference somewhere in the coffee world and not have to wonder if I am just being suckered into some big corporations marketing scam.

    Travis.

  23. #123
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by 65484C404D210 link=1166962996/120#120 date=1231247157
    Quote Originally Posted by KoffeeKid link=1166962996/100#119 date=1231239918
    And thatís how this expensive but thoroughly enjoyable addiction started.
    Welcome KoffeeKid..... [smiley=thumbsup.gif]

    Youve certainly come to the right place to satisfy your [s]addiction[/s] [s]obsession[/s] interest ::) in all things coffee. Hope you have a lot of fun... :)

    By the way, theres no need for this hobby to become an expensive one and when it really comes right down to it, expensive really only applies if youre not getting the most out of what youve bought and you will certainly learn how to do that here ;)

    Cheers,
    Mal.
    And thats something I want to make sure of...that I look to getting the most out of, and learning through trial and error, how best to use my new toy.

    How I ended up in a place like this? Ive always enjoyed coffee, and most of all those I have run into from time to time in a coffee shop somewhere who somehow made me a coffee which was nothing like anything I had tasted. And lately moccona just hasn;t seemed to cut it for me.

    Where will it end? Who knows, but im just gonna sit back and enjoy the ride.

  24. #124
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Ive been a Coffeesnob for a couple of years now and proud of it!! Yesterday I visited a cafe with my son and mother, we went for coffee and cake. It had a lively good vibe and the cakes and food looked fantastic, I ordered a traditional machiato and two capos for mum and son. Cakes and service were excellent, alas the coffee was not, I drank my short mach and was not going to say anything but the cafe owner made the mistake of asking me how my short mach was, I sat looking at him for a moment and I told him I didntlike it, he asked why and I said--too hot, milk was froth on top not microfoam, coffee was bitter, overextracted, lacked body and had no crema, he offered me another coffee but I declined, he immediately went to the till and refunded my money which I did not ask to be done. This place has so much potential but the coffee was a total disappointment, a few years ago I would have consumed this beverage and thought it was ok--see what youve done to me CS!!!

  25. #125
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    We blame establishments for incorrectly extracted coffees...but sometimes you have to wonder at the clients, too.

    When they ask for non-standard concoctions. A "weak" hot latte, a "strong" latte. How weak is weak, and how strong is strong?

    I know when I shake my head at the orders Im equally as snobbish as when I sample the establishments offings and they dont come up to scratch.

  26. #126
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by 4D505D4A4C4B503F0 link=1166962996/124#124 date=1232969634
    We blame establishments for incorrectly extracted coffees...but sometimes you have to wonder at the clients, too.

    When they ask for *non-standard concoctions. *A "weak" *hot latte, *a "strong" latte. * How weak is weak, and how strong is strong?

    I know when I shake my head at the orders *Im equally as snobbish as when I sample the establishments offings and they dont come up to scratch.
    Weak and strong shouldnt be that hard Robusto- as the "standard" is just a ristretto or doppio ristretto into the base of your standard 150-200ml cup. Naturally, this still leads to significant varation when you factor in blend and quality of extraction.

    The one that always used to crack me up was the "Can I have a *insert chosen milky drink here*, and can you make it nice and hot?"

    ....."Well, I can make it nice, or I can make it hot, which would you prefer? :-? ::)"

    2mcm...

  27. #127
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    While Ive been drinking espresso since the late 90s it wasnt until I moved to Australia that I really got into coffee culture.

    I got hooked on Merlo beans and since then have fallen in love with less commerical beans and local cafes that roast in house.

    Ive come a long way from my days of drinking percualted coffee at my local Tim Hortons in Canada .. but I still love Tim Hortons and I always make sure I hit the drive through when Im back home .. its kinda like going back to my roots.

  28. #128
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I worked in a restaurant/bar which although had all the capability to produce good coffee, nobody had the correct training to produce a good espresso. The art of coffee making was often measured by speed at the sacrifice of quality as we often had to make coffee whilst operating the register, making and pouring other drinks. Try to imagine separated, reheated and scorched milk, exhausted and bitter espresso.

    We often got the Crema Magazine and Cafebiz publications which often had fascinating and detailed articles on coffee. This gave me inspiration to visit all Melbournes institution of coffee BBB. (Its was the closest to work)

    Such began my love for coffee.

    After finishing school I decided I wanted a break from a 10-14 hour days and 60-70 hour weeks. I took up a position at Coffee Shop at Clayton Monash and am thoroughly enjoying making coffee and looking forward to the specialist courses offered.

    My travels have seen me visit renowned cafes in Melbourne (St Ali, BBB, Switchboard, Primary to name a few...), Sydney (Velluto Nero, Campos, Espresso Galleria) and Brisbane.

    I plan to visit a cupping session in the upcoming Melbourne Food and Wine Festival.

  29. #129
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by 09564E585358545D5D5E5E565A553B0 link=1166962996/125#125 date=1232970587
    Quote Originally Posted by 4D505D4A4C4B503F0 link=1166962996/124#124 date=1232969634
    We blame establishments for incorrectly extracted coffees...but sometimes you have to wonder at the clients, too.

    When they ask for *non-standard concoctions. *A "weak" *hot latte, *a "strong" latte. * How weak is weak, and how strong is strong?

    I know when I shake my head at the orders *Im equally as snobbish as when I sample the establishments offings and they dont come up to scratch.
    Weak and strong shouldnt be that hard Robusto- as the "standard" is just a ristretto or doppio ristretto into the base of your standard 150-200ml cup. Naturally, this still leads to significant varation when you factor in blend and quality of extraction.

    The one that always used to crack me up was the "Can I have a *insert chosen milky drink here*, and can you make it nice and hot?"

    ....."Well, I can make it nice, or I can make it hot, which would you prefer? *:-? ::)"

    2mcm...
    one cafe owner said that he would just heat the glass to barely touchable and make a proper drink in it. Customer would be invariably pleased... that is if you still want to make them happy without actually killing the drink ;-) I guess its a bit easier than repeat 10times a day that milk burns at 73C or something...

  30. #130
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by 28232A393F392E384B0 link=1166962996/128#128 date=1235608200
    one cafe owner said that he would just heat the glass to barely touchable and make a proper drink in it.
    What about a take-away container?

    Some asking for super-hot probably doesnt appreciate what not-burnt milk tastes like. Their taste buds were scalded off long away *;)

  31. #131
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by 313B2E3939362224570 link=1166962996/129#129 date=1235608373
    What about a take-away container?
    Perhaps you could set fire to it just as you hand it over.
    "You have about 20 seconds... GO!"

  32. #132
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    For me it has been building gradually over time. But when I joined this site and started reading and building my skills, I crossed the line into the domain of coffee snob. Now I am unable to drink instant without gagging. And most coffees ordered in coffee shops end up in dissappointment. At least I can say with honesty that what I get at home is Best!!!

  33. #133
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    My journey began with Phil (previous owner of Dancing Bean in George Str, Brisbane) suggesting I try a piccolo one day when i hesitated with my order at the counter. I would say the actual turning point was when I bought the Iberital Challenge through him and started chewing through the different SOs.

  34. #134
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I started out with a cafe roma thing for a year or so, desperately longing for a better machine.....then i got divorced! :D, i rushed out only days later and got a sunbeam 6910, jumped on the net for some tips, google searched and......uh oh, it seemed it was plagued with problems, so i promptly took it back and joined coffeesnobs.com.au, after some research i ended up picking up a silvia and rocky, then a popper, then a corretto......the rest is history! :)

    Love this site, so so so addicted!

  35. #135
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Until about 13 years ago coffee to me was the awful crap spat out by vending machines. I was predominantly a tea drinker, I never bothered to make my own instant and drip coffee always tasted stale and bitter. My first espresso shot was given to me by the Italian father of a girl I was seeing when I was about 18...and it put me off coffee for about 8 years!
    About 8 years later a friend introduced me to stovetops, maybe my palate had changed, but I was immediately taken with the taste and the affect the caffeine had on me. I never got round to buying my own, but not too long after that I moved to Australia...to Melbourne where I was immersed in the coffee culture.
    My first few places of residence out here were in shared houses and my friends all had stovetops to enjoy, I got my own one and then got a cup filter to enjoy fresh coffee at work. From there on I somehow ended up with about 8 stovetops. I used to drink a mug of espresso before work and probably up to 5 - 8 coffees during the day...I was a caffeine junky!
    Just over 3 years ago I was given a Krups espresso maker as a wedding present. The krups was a revelation, the coffee was so much better than the stovetops...I was very happy.

    Then I joined this website.

    I learned about unpressurised baskets, about different espresso machines, about good grinders and from then on the Krups days were numbered. It has since gone back to the friends who gave it to me and my wife as a wedding present.

    Im now in a relationship with Miss Silvia...although deep down I know that in some years time, when the time is right...Ill hopefully buy a Giotto or something similar.

  36. #136
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Well like many my coffee started off at home... as a teenager with a mother who is passionate about good tasting strong black coffee it was inevitable. Strangely enough I started off with white instant coffee, but quickly graduated to enjoying black plunger coffee by the age of 18.

    A few years later I am now starting off my own journey of coffee. Recently being given a Breville 800ES home machine. Im sure this was because not all my visitors enjoyed strong stove top black coffee like myself - fussy cuppacino drinkers.

    After being given this machine I went and did a quick crash course of coffee and the making of. That is where I heard of CS, the teacher mentioned it would be a great resource and place to learn... well so far from my silent browsing she was not wrong!

  37. #137
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    It all started back at uni...

    I wasnt the best student and spent many nights completing last minute assignments. To help complete these long arduous nights, I needed a cup or a few cups of the good stuff. Being poor (I was a student) I bought the most expensive machine that I could (plunger) and bought the best beans that a supermarket could supply and soldiered on and completed my degree.

    After completing uni, I moved to Newcastle and whilst looking for work, I spent 6 months on and in the cafes of Darby Street, namely Goldbergs. Many day was spent whiling away and waiting for coffees to come out of that highly relaxed cafe, which is where I went from adding sugar into my coffee to finally appreciating the flavour that is the coffee.

    From Newcastle I moved to Mildura and got a real job but yearned for more so I picked up a weekend job in a fledgling Espresso Bar. Mild snobbery turned to pure snobbery after two years of working there and now cant bear to have anything else than a well pulled espresso with beautifully textured milk.

    I now live in Thirroul, near Wollongong and travel many kilometres to get a cafe fix. At home I am still using a EM6900, a friend that I have had since mid 2006.

    Just when I feel that the coffee journey is about at its end, I am happily surprised as I learn that it has only just begun.

  38. #138
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    The female and the male Luwak grew up in separate colonies on the eastern seaboard. *Both enjoyed the nectar of the chosen fruit, such as it was (Blend 43), in their infancy, being well and truly addicted by the age of 7 *:D. *The granulated form sustained them throughout adolescence into adulthood. *After taking the plunge(r) together, they moved to a colony in a New town where Campos was de rigour. *After the first fruitful mating season :-*, they migrated to a northern inland colony where they were less confident of the availability of suitable nectar (though they did find some Out the Back). Hence the acquisition of dear Roma :). *Roma was lovingly given a diet of pre-ground, then home ground beans as the Luwak colony expanded and migrated southward. *She was also lovingly flogged until she passed away last August. * *:(
    Em (6910) came to live with us the same week *:)(such is the grieving process amongst Luwaks) and her little brother Sunny (480) joined the colony shortly thereafter. *Life only got better for the Luwaks as sustenance crossed the blurred line into hobby :D. *
    Seeking to caffeinate the local human populace was nearly fatal for Em, so the colony was bolstered by the addition of Rosetta (Rancilio S24) and her little brother Rocky. *Along the way, the colony became acquainted with other lovers of the red-gold nectar (CSers) 8-). *Now the Luwaks are poor, but happy and are roasting their own beans to feed the insatiable Rosetta and Rocky.

  39. #139
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    My earliest coffee memory would have to be some time in the mid to late 80s when my father would bring back vac packs of coffee from PNG for my mother who would use it in her french press...i would have been maybe 10 years old at the time at the most? black with 2 sugars( i had a sweet tooth :)) and cream ...just like mum!

    It wasnt untill i started working in a cafe that i really got into espresso and it wasnt till i spoke to a mochapan rep that i found out that people actually made a living out of making coffee?!?!?! What is this "barista" thingy you speak of? i said......the rest is history!

    Half a dozen Sunbeams and Brevilles later i thought i had figured it all out but NO i was wrong! A 1 year stint at Ill Covo / Cafe 51 in Canberra changed my veiws on espresso FOREVER!!!
    I have been a barista ever since and i never want to do anything else!
    I love coffee so much ...well i cant think of a good analigy but i love coffee ok?

    After that it was a couple more Sunbeams followed by a couple of Gaggias and NOW the mighty Dalla Corte Mini! and at the rate i have been going through coffee with my new machine...i will be a 50kg a year man?!?!!? But im sure i will slow it down once the novelty wears off...i just figure for the money i spent on my new set up...i want to make sure its used accordingly :)

    Anyway...did i mention i love coffee?

  40. #140
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I was practically weaned onto coffee according to my mother and for as long back as I can remember mum had always brought me in a cup of coffee every morning to wake me. As I grew up our tastes matured ever so slowly and we progressed from 43 beans to Moccona to eventually supposedly peak at coffee in those coffee cafes we all know the names of.

    One day recently whilst out searching for a bargain I came across a brand new unused 2nd hand Breville Ikon for the princely sum of $100...I figured I had to have it and came home and hit the internet in search of info regarding the new machine I had purchased. I found this site and got busy reading about all the tricks and joys of real coffee...really good coffee is something I am still working towards and looking forward to.

    I still drink the odd cup of instant, it now tastes like a totally different beverage and not at all like the constantly improving brews from the Ikon.

  41. #141
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    *shakes dust off thread*

    A late bloomer by all accounts from what I have read here. *Spent my late teens right through to my late 20s as a cyclist and without fail at least one training ride a week involved a stop at the local cafe.

    For my mind those years were the ones that have set me on the path of coffee appreciation. *In between Ive bought a couple of drip filter machines, a plunger or two and dabbled in the making of ones own espresso with what I remember being a very cheap machine and at the risk of immediately being booted off the site I do still have the odd cup of instant when I visit my mother-in-laws place (she loves it).

    In more recent times Ive had the opportunity through work and the love of coffee by some learned employees to be able to use a Lelit Combo machine to make my very own (as noted in my Welcome Post). *This brings me to now - Looking for a Barista course in Brisbane, gauging interest from the other like-minded coffee drinkers at work for the course and pouring over these pages right here to learn anything I can about how to make a good coffee.

    The next step is to get myself setup at home so Im well chuffed Ive found this spot just to be able to read others experiences and get a good feel for where I should start in terms of equipment. *Thankfully Im in no rush and I am at work, as of 2 days ago since my registration on this site, adjusting my grind and tamp pressure to taste the subtle differences in each one I make.

    The final (or maybe its the first of many) challenge in my journey is to convince the Minister for Finance (My Mrs.) of the value and benefit that a good quality machine and grinder brings to the household.

    Beyond now; I have seen the term upgraditis mentioned quite regularly so who knows what will happen next.

    Cheers,

    Jaso
    Beginner

  42. #142
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    For me, I have been brought up drinking Blend 43...I have yet to taste any of the 43 beans they use to make it tho..

    My wife bought me a Krups machine about 5 years ago and it is slowly dieing. *I realised that I cant bear the thaught of having to drink instant.

    Living in Kalgoorlie, almost everyone I know has a Delonghi fully auto machine. *Unfortunately the coffee is never hot enough and most people microwave it before serving. *Sort of defeats the purpose.... ::) *My mate in Brisvegas *told me to get a Rancillo Silva and a decent grinder.

    My coffee trees should be fruiting soon so I guess I will need a roaster too....Better do some more research I guess.


  43. #143
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by 362B2F20272129420 link=1166962996/141#141 date=1255336854
    For me, I have been brought up drinking Blend 43...I have yet to taste any of the 43 beans they use to make it tho..

    My wife bought me a Krups machine about 5 years ago and it is slowly dieing. *I realised that I cant bear the thaught of having to drink instant.

    Living in Kalgoorlie, almost everyone I know has a Delonghi fully auto machine. *Unfortunately the coffee is never hot enough and most people microwave it before serving. *Sort of defeats the purpose.... ::) *My mate in Brisvegas *told me to get a Rancillo Silva and a decent grinder.

    My coffee trees should be fruiting soon so I guess I will need a roaster too....Better do some more research I guess.
    Good job and welcome. Theres a few threads over in the General coffee related section about growing your own, any offerings you can share will be helpful Im sure. Welcome again to the snobbery, have a great stay.

  44. #144
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I believe it is my turn to tell my story.
    It all began about 18months ago. We liked coffee that we were getting in Melbourne when we went there on weekends.
    Then Gloria Jeans opened in our rural city (I can hear the groans so stop it!) We were spending quite a bit of our hard earned cash there so the thoughts started. If we used their beans and took them home and used one of the coffee makers could we produce coffee as good? You must remember we didnt know any better then. Well we could not make coffee as good. So the search was on for an espresso machine. We settled on the SB6910 which served us well for 15 months. We learnt there is more to coffee than we even thought possible. We discovered the barista at GJ was very passionate about his coffee and we had many conversations with him about technique and coffee in general. I completed the SB coffee school and a basic barista course to help me on the way.
    The learning curve was steep at first but we are glad we climbed the curve.
    With the recent update to the Minore III and compak 3 elite we are again climbing up the curve although not quite as steep.
    We are grateful for the support of the CS community the response for our questions and the suggestions that we have been able to try and adapt for our selves is fantastic. I am proud to be a part of this community.
    I guess that is us in a nutshell (cause we are nuts)
    Regards
    Crisp Image

  45. #145
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Ive been trawling through the site, gleaning as much information as possible.

    Guess its my turn to post a little about myself

    Coming from a household where the only coffee available was instant, and weak instant at that, coffee wasnt exactly in my background.

    However, my earliest memory of non instant was probably Kopi O Peng........iced black and sweet coffee in Malaysia. The brew was strong, sweet but most importantly cold. An amazingly refreshing drink in the hot and humid environment that is Kuala Lumpur.

    First real experience of coffee in my adult life wasnt until I was doing my postgrad studies. One of the guys in the house I was sharing was an amazing coffee.....food....music.......snob....Pretty much a snob on most things. However, he did truly introduce me to the world of coffee.

    The first coffee he made me was a strong turkish. Blasted thing was so strong, I swear my heart skipped a beat. However, it gave me a taste for the stuff. Again, coffee and sugar. I know there is a thread asking about whether one consumes coffee with or without sugar. For me, with my sweet tooth and coffee introduction, it has always been with sugar :)

    After that, it was a gradual introduction to stove top perculators, plungers, etc. Introduction then was still store bought coffee, and not freshly roasted, but a step above instant.

    From there, I started frequenting cafes. At first, it was a matter of a place to hang after hours where one could chat into the wee hours of the night. Often, this was with food....cakes, pastries, etc. Coffee was initially more an afterthought. But the more I frequented said establishment, the more I got a taste for the dark brew.

    My nexzt step into the world of coffee was via a gift from the staff at work, who got me a barista class. That, combined with the already developing taste for coffee sparked the next phase of my evolution as a coffee snob.

    The class spurred me onto th enet to look for more information about coffee, bringing me to this site. Since then, its been a rapidly developing addiction and it seems a costly background :) Have just purchased my first set up. A VBM Picollo and Compak K3 Elite, which Im still trying to learn.

    Am eager to get into roasting next :)

    Too many things and too little time :D

  46. #146
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Im not entirely at complete coffee snobbery yet. I still have so very much to learn - which is why Im lurking here all the time.

    I dont remember when I started liking coffee. I have a feeling it began back in the Philippines when I was just a wee baby and the maids used to spike my milk with coffee (against my mothers wishes). I then floated around stealing coffee flavoured things from my grandmothers store like cakes, cookies, sweets, etc and inhaling peoples mugs like a prepubescent stoner.

    When I was 8, I asked my mum if I could have a coffee. She gave me an instant decaf which put me off until I started high school and my mother bought an espresso machine. Then I started sneaking sips when she wasnt looking until she realised that when shed put her mug down half of it was gone.

    She gave in *8-)

    Of course, you have to start some place, so I started with GJ at 12, then bounced to Starbucks at 14 (they raised me until I was 16 and they shut down) then found a small local cafe which was good (not great) and lived there when I realised how under par Starbucks was and wandered disillusioned for awhile. My favourite barista left and a very nice young man replaced her and made me scalding, burnt lattes with 2mm of grounds floating around the bottom. *:( I was very sad.

    When I went to Italy in year 11, there was a lovely little cafe in Vico Equense that made heavenly EVERYTHING! So I spent a good few hundred euros on coffees there.

    SO Im in a coffee drought at the moment because I cant find a consistent good cup anywhere near where I live. I work at a cafe but Im assigned as the sandwich maker (I did not walk in, ask for a job and wave my barista license in the boss face to be a sandwich maker!) and the things they do to their coffee is blasphemous *shudder* but I wont mention them. Not until I get fired.

    Now I am in search for a place to get my fix. I once got a really nice latte from a cafe next to my flute shop, but travelling 2 hours for a coffee is a bit much for me.

  47. #147
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Probably started when we began to build our new house. My wife wanted a larger kitchen then previous homes and I wanted something nicer on the bench then the old Breville machine or stovetop.

    I guess also that especially over the past 2 or 3 years, higher work stresses then usual (I.T Database Manager) I started needing a strong hot coffee every morning......

    Then about a month ago, I added up how much I was spending paying for coffee at work and almost died.

    And so, since then here I am and with a great machine from Chris....:)

  48. #148
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Im just beginning to work on it (coffeesnobbery), but my 2 year old son is on his way O_o If we leave our cups on the coffee table after weve finished he makes a beeline for them, scoops them up, upends the dregs/foam into his mouth - and loooooves it.



    Poor wee thing: the better the coffee, the less is left for him :P

  49. #149
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Such a great thread.

    When I started reading I thought I was a mild coffeesnob but by the end I realised Im actually a coffeenoob I had a laugh!

    My addiction started thanks to both parents being coffee drinkers but it was only ever instant for them and myself right up until I started working in the city (Sydney) about 12 years ago. I found myself trying just about all the local shops out in the area untill I settled on one I really liked and became a regular.

    Ive since moved to the Blue Mountains NSW and there wasnt a huge range of quality coffee up here untill about 2 years ago when a small shop The Pink Papaya arrived just up the road from work.. Needless to say I now know all the staff on a first name basis and dont have to say a word when I walk in, they all know my order.

    Ive only just bought my first machine for home (last weekend) and have begun my journey into the wonderful world that is coffee and snobbery!

    Cheers
    Craig.

  50. #150
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    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    haha this is a funny story,
    one christmas as a youngin (Prolly about 5y.o), we had the whole family over, all 30,40,50 or whatever of us.. (this was a rarity as we lived in Tamworth at the time) and celebrations were in order, so dad went round asking all the adults if theyd like a coffee, I, being the smartass child I was (and possibly still am) stuck my hand up and said, ILL HAVE ONE!!
    dad, thinking he would teach me a lesson, decided to pull a really short, syrup like espresso for me.
    down the hatch it went, cup back on the table, all the adults crowding around me, expecting to see a look of shear disgust on my face, and out came a little voice.. "can i have another one?"

    haha and ever since then my love affair with coffee has grown, until recently, it has become somewhat more serious for me, and as a result I am looking into persuing it as a carreer. ;D

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