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Thread: How I became a coffeesnob

  1. #201
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    I was never a big coffee drinker, but on a recent trip to Europe, I figured this was a good time to dive in.

    I had some terrific coffee in Italy.

    Not so much in France...

    Since getting home, I picked up a used Gaggia Classic dirt cheap, cleaned her up, bought a smart grinder, and here I am! The whole setup has cost me very little, but I'm getting some cracking results!

    Lots of great info here, which has been a great help.

    Andrew

  2. #202
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    i was contented with nescafe blend 43 for a whole 2 years. Disliked coffee as a beverage from the get go and only started consuming because boring work called for it and most of the work meetings involved coffee.

    i think i must have acquired the taste in the past year or so when i began to discern how bad those $10 blends were compared to a nice cuppa, even from the chain cafe at the ground floor of my building.

    i think the turning point was when the auditors bought me a flat white from the lowdown (one of the better cafes in Perth) and that totally blew me away I started patronizing since.

    Bought a jura superauto in july thinking convenient coffee was actually a viable option but that couldn't even come close to satisfying my coffee craves in terms of strength or flavour, especially on those dreary monday mornings.

    found coffeesnobs in august, decided to forego and save myself the upgrade misery of going through single boiler machines and went straight for a hx. Got a quickmill anita and baratza vario in september and i've been in coffee bliss since. Not looking back.

  3. #203
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    Sounding very familiar there...

    Hated that bitter, nasty drink since I was little... until I tried decent fresh-ground beans in a plunger. Since then it's been... a progression.

  4. #204
    B85
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    Before this year I thought coffee obsessed people were strange, I mean what is the difference between McDonalds coffee and something like Campos... Coffee to my was all the same and I didnt like the taste. My wife drank instant coffee and I drank tea. Then I went away with a mate who sells his roasted coffee and I got an education in how coffee can taste so good done well and so easy to make bad. I discovered that I enjoy good coffee and the whole process of crafting a great cup of coffee. I brought my first machine a BZ99 and a sunbeam grinder (an error on the grinder) and I am about to upgrade to a Ponte Vecchio because I want to take the whole crafting process further.

  5. #205
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    WOW. Some great stories. I grew up on international roast (.....feeling ill.....) in a time and place where coffee only came in cans. When I moved to the big smoke to study at Uni I found myself devouring the equivalent of 26cups a day of Nescafe Blend 43 to get through my final Thesis. Got me through Uni but the withdrawal symptoms were painful. A friend started experimenting with roasting and I had returned from a month in Italy. I realised then that coffee is not packaged in tin or glass jars joined CS and after several years accumulating funds and getting high at the Sydney coffee festivals I invested in my ECM Giotto.
    Last edited by Dr._V; 14th October 2013 at 09:37 PM. Reason: fatigue

  6. #206
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    Never liked coffee or tea the smell made me gag, I moved to the Gold Coast and got a job in fast food. After 9 years I did some courses to try get out of the place, I thought I like to try my hand in the cafe scene as a chef or barista, so the barista course at tafe was a must. After spending a day grinding and pouring coffees I had the smell of it in my system, followed by the change of a hot chocolate after a late shift to a mocha, made by a great barista, followed by halft strength latte then caps, and now I like a good strong coffee with subtle caramels that linger as the after taste, the kind of coffee that you smell the flavour and know it's going to be better to drink then to smell. So after 2-3 years of coffee made on my trusty saeco, I have stepped up in the world to a lovely rancilio set. You are all re-inspiring me to get it right again. Thank you!

  7. #207
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    I wasn't a coffee drinker at all until university (20+ years ago now). To help with the all nighters we set up a percolater with good ole Harris from the supermarket. And that's were I camped for quite along time until the early 2000's when I started working with a group that made sure we all went for a coffee at least once a week. So I found myself at a real cafe trying to figure out what to order and went with a flat white...cause...why not... I put sugar in it as I always did with coffee and one of my colleagues suggested that I try it one day without sugar to get the real taste of it. So I did that and started to realise that there was something more to this then the caffeine hit and the morning tea banter. I am the type of person that needs to understand how things are done and why so I started to look into the eXpresso thing as I still called it. I picked up some Paul Bassett DVDs which helped me along and bought my first eSpresso machine - a Via Venezia. We had a love hate relationship but I managed to get the best out of it and even some passable latte art after chucking out the paranello sheath. The machine started to die and I had a lull in home made espresso for a few years. I dabbled in lavazza's pod system and recently tried a few nesspressos at friends'. My wife recently did a barrista course (she's never been that interested in it till now) so I decided it was time to get back into it. We picked up an BES920 and SG combo last week and I'm in heaven again. I never thought I would hear my self say I bought a breville espresso machine, but I am really happy with it (thanks to the snobs here for their reviews and comments). Still working the kinks out of it all but for me that's part of the fun. I am a snob in training I guess you could say. So much to learn.

  8. #208
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    Hi all, I worked in a cafe on weekends while I was doing my apprenticeship as a cabinetmaker, but hated coffee! It wasn't till I moved from the Sunshine Coast in QLD to Melbourne that I had my first real coffee. It was nice but didn't excite me too much. Then I met my wife who is Italian,and everything changed! The first time I met her father at his place, he made me a short black with a stove top percolator and I fell in love with coffee. I had 3 that night and didn't sleep! He dropped in 2 days later and bought me a new bialetti. The following week I had dinner at her mothers house and she had a la cimbali jnr sitting on the bench, and made me the best latte I had ever had! I then discovered a great cafe around the corner and was hooked. But it wasn't till about 2 1/2 years ago while I was doing a kitchen Reno for a client who was throwing out a gaggia classic that I discovered coffee a home. It took a while to get used to, and the results using pre ground coffee from my local deli were a bit to be desired. but I bought this old commercial gaggia grinder and fresh beans And started getting good results. 5 machines later......I work from home now which helped me justify blowing out my bank account on a GS3! The results are amazing and I think my upgraditis is finally cured! I've also started Turning custom timber handles and knobs for all kinds of machines and really getting a buzz out of it! I'm off to the coffee expo today to see Andy and hopefully start on my first roasting from home adventure! I'm still learning everyday but loving the adventure! Loving all the other stories, this is a great thread!

  9. #209
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    Hated coffee for most of my life. 2 years ago wife got a pod machine. Given they are so weak I got used to the taste.

    Went from that to a rubbish delonghi auto machine, to a rocket giotto with a mazzer grinder & barista course. Oops.

    Now the giotto is plumbed in for both mains + drip tray so I basically have a near commercial setup in the kitchen.
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  10. #210
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    Year 11 (2002)
    Started drinking coffee (friend worked at Gloria Jeans - my coffee always had 2 sugars and sometimes chocolate)


    2005 - Philips Senseo
    I won it in a competition - a kettle soon became more useful than the crap this was producing. Reverted back to store coffee (still have the included mugs to this day, though!)


    2010 - Vietnamese Drip Coffee and French Press
    Awesome stuff! Bought freshly grounded beans to use in this slow drip contraption! Very cheap 'machine'.


    2011 - Nespresso: Pixie
    First serious coffee machine I bought after obtaining the Senseo. Pretty good, but little did I know what was truly out there... Had a good run with it.


    2012 - Nespresso: Latissima +
    Upgraded from the Pixie to this. Meanwhile I started reading up on forums and alternatives.

    Jan - March 2014

    Did a 3 hour coffee making class and really got my hands dirty. Wanted a machine to try out my skills so bought a second hand Breville Cafe Roma for $15. It produced fantastic coffee thanks to the ground used (5 Senses). Meanwhile, the Nespresso starts to produce cold milk and pods were getting expensive. Also, they simply weren't environmentally friendly.

    June 2014
    My first foray into serious coffee through <$500 manual machines: Sunbeam EM7000 and Breville Smart Grinder entered my world much sooner than anticipated - hey they were on sale.

    Future

    So far I'm happy with my newly acquired toys and can't wait to go through my first purchase from BeanBay, etc.

  11. #211
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    I started drinking coffee mainly for the caffeine hit, but kept the bitterness subdued with sugar. Over time the sugar was cut back, and i came to appreciate the different flavours in the coffee. The next step was to drag out the sunbeam machine that had been sitting in the cupboard followed by the purchase of an unpressurised basket and a sunbeam grinder following a bit of research on coffeesnobs regarding how to get the best out of the machine.

    With the death of the Sunbeam machine, and a period of coffee withdrawals, I purchased a Silvia and Rocky from a fellow Coffeesnob. Next was the step to 1 group commercial machine which barely fit in the kitchen, then on to my current Bezzera Magica and Vario grinder setup.

  12. #212
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    My SO bought me a grinder and EM6910 approximately 2 years ago for a combined birthday and Xmas present, although I don' t recall ever asking for one!
    Chugged along grinding store bought beans, then upgraded our beans from roasters in Sydney.
    Recently disappointed with the inconsistency of the roasted beans we have been getting, somehow found CS, thought about home roasting, read some, bought a BM, Bosch heatgun, and thought, what the heck, and so far, in my short time roasting, I have roasted beans that have surpassed most of coffees we have bought from various cafes. Have learnt the importance of tamp, grind, water temperature, frothing, roasting profile,etc from this magnificent CS community, and am now enjoying some of the best coffees I have ever had. Still have a lot to learn though, having come from a low base.
    Cheers

  13. #213
    JKM
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    My wife and sister in law bought a cafe 10 years ago. The cafe used locally roasted beans by a small roaster but the cafe pumped through 50-60kgs per week and I became head barista. Before this period I actually hated coffee and tea. And then the obsession began, hahahahaha...

    Now I've worked for 4 different commercial roasters in Sydney, and become a half decent roaster. Also been a coffee sales rep, visiting cafe's and trying coffee (and selling it, I had a laugh). I then started my own importing business, brining coffee roasters (TJ-067) into Australia. After I sold my business I was approached by La Marzocco Australia (Sydney branch) to join the team and bench test brand new LM coffee machines that come into Australia. I also helped to set up a coffee school in Parramatta and I spend my spare time teaching roasting classes. I also wrote a book too (Coffee Capsule Cashflow).

    Coffee is my life now and becoming a coffee snob was just the beginning!

  14. #214
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    One day I woke up and said to myself: you're not a true hipster if your coffee gear doesn't cost more then your neighbour's car. The rest is history

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    Quote Originally Posted by AdrianN View Post
    One day I woke up and said to myself: you're not a true hipster if your coffee gear doesn't cost more then your neighbour's car. The rest is history
    looking at our neighbours car thatís hardly a big call, on the other hand he may have a few months rego left on it? Its hard to tell now we donít need stickers.

    for me personally my Coffee habits have been a long journey from instant beginnings, it still trails behind beer and food however it has probably recently surpassed red wine.
    So iam prolly still primarily a food dude.

  16. #216
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    Quote Originally Posted by koshari View Post
    looking at our neighbours car that’s hardly a big call, on the other hand he may have a few months rego left on it?
    Chill mate, it was supposed to be a joke.

  17. #217
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdrianN View Post
    Chill mate, it was supposed to be a joke.
    I took it as such. You obviously didnt get the bit about the rego being woth more than tbe car. Carry on.

  18. #218
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    Just drop in a smilie next time, they're made exactly for ths kind of situation.
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  19. #219
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdrianN View Post
    Just drop in a smilie next time, they're made exactly for ths kind of situation.
    ok and a like to your initial post.
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  20. #220
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    When I was a teenager, started drinking Turkish coffee brewed at home and it all blew up exponentially from there.
    Now its at geek level.
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  21. #221
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    I have really enjoyed reading the stories posted here.
    I have just turned 60 and remember as a teenager travelling to and from school in Melbourne along Sydney Road Brunswick. I discovered a cafe there where we could play pool and there were all these italian older men drinking coffee that looked like ink in small white cups. So different to home where my parents used to drink instant "Pablo" from very large glass jars. Couldn't stand coffee at home but the Brunswick stuff got me hooked.
    Subsequently I discovered Lygon street and a range of other interesting and assorted coffee places.
    I moved to regional Queensland in 95, a place not renowned for its coffee culture but I found a cafe that had a very impressive looking espresso machine. I duly ordered a coffee and stared in horror as the woman fired up the machine to get the hot water to add to the instant nescafe she put in my cup. Fortunately I was alone or I could have had a Gough moment "Comrade we are amongst the philistines!"
    Since then the coffee culture and quality has improved greatly in regional Queensland and in Brisbane too but there are odd occasions when I am in a cafe and order my espresso and I get the look like I am from another planet. I recall ordering an espresso takeaway in Logan in Queensland and when the person who served me saw just how little coffee was in the takeaway cup she redid the coffee adding several more shots until it looked like big enough to her.
    In my travels I have had a drip machine (It made good coffee and was gravity fed,) a glorious one espresso size stove top machine, pod machines and different espresso machines and now have one that produces great coffee using coffee snobs material. So good is it that I like my espresso, my partner her latte and the first thing my teenage son does each morning (even before food) is make himself a coffee.

  22. #222
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    I used to think that "coffee flavour" was burnt / bitter / sour or your choice of a blend of the three if you got fancy. I had assumed that people wanted the caffeine and just forced themselves to get used to the taste in order to get it.

    The first coffee I remember having was served at a table of old Italian men who were sitting around drinking tar balls out of little cups. I didn't have another coffee for quite some time.

    about 4 years ago I ended up getting a job in an office that had a strong coffee culture. People were always ducking out to the nearest cafe for a cup of their favourite brew. I quickly got sick of strange looks I got when I ordered my hot chocolate.

    Eventually I started ordering flat whites ... you're never too old for peer pressure it seems!

    Once I was able to drink a coffee without wincing I started to notice that I disliked some coffees more than others. Eventually I realised there were some cafes where I actually didn't mind the coffee.

    Once my coffee habit was firmly established I started to consider what it was costing me each week ... 3 large flat whites a day @ $4 or more each ... hmmm

    At home I bought a pod machine so that I could give "decent" coffee to guests when they came over & so that I could have non-objectionable coffee on the weekends. At work I continued to buy my coffees. I tried coffee bags but gave them away very quickly. My work has super-automatics every few floors in the building but the smell just offends me.

    Eventually I bought a Breville grinder and a Europiccola to try the espresso experience for myself at home. It was wonderful. The pod machine disappeared outside straight away. I quickly found though that the Europiccola required constant attention which I couldn't give it due to having an "active" house (2 small kids). I decided I needed to get a different style of machine and started looking around.

    I started to read about how home roast was easy and gave the best flavour results. I started to read about how the taste was better than many coffee shops you would normally experience. I got curious. I bought some beans locally and roasted them in a steel mixing bowl. After two roasts I switched to the bread machine.

    After my first taste of home roast I got online straight away and ordered several types of bean off Bean Bay.

    Eventually I found a E61 Hx machine for $550 (la Scala Butterfly) which was pre-loved. It was somewhat more pre-loved than I was led to believe but a new pump, new OPV and re-seal of the group head and it's going superbly. One day I might replace the steam wand for a ball joint one and maybe even upgrade the boiler to one of those with the 2nd heat exchanger path for the hot water rather than drawing it straight from the boiler (which is very common, but useless!).

    When I got my Hx I realised I needed to upgrade the grinder. The Europiccola went up for sale and I spent the proceeds from that on a used Compak K6.

    Now I'm happy (sort of!).

    I've got a good grinder, a good machine, fantastic beans and everyone who tastes my coffee thinks its absolutely fantastic.

    I've realised now that coffee actually has a taste and that burnt / bitter / sour just means it's been prepared wrong and the taste has been over ridden by those bad effects.

    And to complete my descent into Coffee Snobbery, this morning I decided not to bother with milk in my coffee and just took the double espresso straight from my Butterfly.
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  23. #223
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    Sorry to ask in the wrong place, but Im new and want to post a question/begin a new thread and can't see where to click.

  24. #224
    Senior Member Vinitasse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celeste View Post
    Sorry to ask in the wrong place, but Im new and want to post a question/begin a new thread and can't see where to click.
    Easy stuff... go to the front page of the forum, choose the general subject heading of what you wish to discuss from the listing of topics on the left hand side of the page, then you will be brought to a new page and at the top of that page you will see the Post New Thread on the upper left side of the page

    Simples :-)

  25. #225
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    God, how embarrassing. Thanks ��

  26. #226
    Senior Member Vinitasse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celeste View Post
    God, how embarrassing. Thanks ��
    No worries :-)

    Been there and done that too

  27. #227
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    Quote Originally Posted by Celeste View Post
    Sorry to ask in the wrong place, but Im new and want to post a question/begin a new thread and can't see where to click.
    Hi Celeste,
    i seem to remember something about not being able to start new threads as anew member until I had clocked up a certain number of posts on other people's threads. Maybe I am mixed up, but I think that's what happened.

    Does anyone know if this is right, or was this just for posting in the For Sale section? If so, how many posts need to be made before you can start a thread?

  28. #228
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    New members can start a new thread anywhere other than in the For Sale and Good Coffee Where areas.


    Java "Welcome to CS" phile
    Toys! I must have new toys!!!

  29. #229
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    Quote Originally Posted by Javaphile View Post
    New members can start a new thread anywhere other than in the For Sale and Good Coffee Where areas.


    Java "Welcome to CS" phile
    Hey, thanks for clearing that up Java!

  30. #230
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    Grew up in Germany, where the coffee is crap: drip filter covered with frothed UHT milk (!). Moved to Aus 10 years ago and discovered the joy of a flat white. Could anyone look back?

  31. #231
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    My turn.

    Started in an office job before there was anything like a "coffee culture" so it was International Roast or Nescafe (or even no-name home brand depending on who did the buying).

    The most exotic I got was a cappucino at a restaurant after dinner. Then the coffee thing started and I started playing around with cappas and lattes, before settling on a plain old flat white, now my staple.

    I didn't realise I was a "coffee snob" till several years ago when we went to the Central Coast for a kids sporting weekend. I worked out that, over the course of the weekend, I spent about $30 on coffees and got one half-decent one. I was thinking, "how could this happen?" I mean, the Central Coast is not too far from Sydney where they would get a lot of tourists from. And some would want a decent coffee.

    So, from then on, part of our trips away involve checking Beanhunter and other sites and making a shortlist. I also now refuse to go to places where I have been frequently disappointed. If I'm out at the shops, I will rather struggle cold-turkey than hand my money over to some 15 year old kid who's on less than minimum wage to make me a cup of frothy dishwater.

    Then, several years ago, my wife bought me a home machine. Later, my kids saved their pocket money and got me some coffee from the local deli/cafe for my birthday. When they got home to Mum, they found out that the shop hadn't ground the beans. They were devastated! So my lovely wife took my kids out and bought a grinder as well.

    Maybe one day, I'll be brave enough to not have milk.
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  32. #232
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    Mine started in phases.

    Firstly back in high school, there always seemed to a French press in use at home or at a friends place, I decided this would be good study fuel. I survived on supermarket coffee and and either a French press or moka pot for a good few years until I was at a friends place who had an el cheapo Sunbeam espresso machine. Naturally that became the new gold standard, and I promptly went out and bought one for myself. Luckily the machine only lasted about a year before the pump went and after looking at the price for a replacement pump, which was almost what the machine cost, I had a good reason to upgrade.
    I chose a second hand La Pavoni professional, simply because I liked the simple design, and that it was capable of making good espresso. Suffice to say I was happy with the choice, although it does take regular polishing to look it's best.
    The next stage came when I moved to PNG, naturally I was expecting good coffee to be readily available, unfortunately this is not the case. As a pilot serving isolated villages, I was flying parchment coffee back from one of the villages on the Huon Peninsula when I decided it was time to learn to roast. I spoke to on of the farmers and asked if I could buy a small bag for my own use, they were more than happy to oblige. So with 2kg of parchment coffee in my hands, it was time to search the internet to figure out how to roast it. My first roast in a pan turned out better than I expected, but I luckily managed to find a popper which has served me well ever since. Since I bought the Behmor though I've had to switch to buying green beans from exporters, but it does make the job a lot easier.
    While I'd love to have my La Pavoni here, I've had to make the switch to an Aeropress for portability reasons and the fact that fresh milk is impossible to come by. I am now lucky enough to enjoy a delicious black coffee every morning made from fresh roasted local beans.

  33. #233
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    I was never really a coffee drinker as I was having difficulty sleeping as I sleep during daytime because of a night job.

    Used to drink Starbucks Fraps every now and then. One day, I was just browsing some food site and found a "Top Coffee Shops in Manila (Philippines)" article and checked it out, went into one (Toby's Estate) and ordered a Gibraltar at first, and then a Flat White, instantly fell in love. It was also the first time I've seen latte art! From then on, I started researching about coffee. Started looking at espresso machines. Watched reviews. Found a users thread here in Coffeesnobs and have been a lurker since then.

    A year after, last month, I bought my first espresso machine, the Breville Dual Boiler, and now on a new journey of discovering different beans and learning the process of steaming milk, which I can never get to froth ! But overall, I'm happy.

  34. #234
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    Coffee snob is such a bad term, I prefer to think of it more as an enthusiast like any person with a hobby/interest in a product or ingredient. Its enjoyed for the pleasure not need or want.

    I believe the best coffee is still unbelievably under priced. Set up such as a hand grinder, aeropress, scale, quality water & beans your all set to enjoy the best coffees in the world.

  35. #235
    Senior Member artman's Avatar
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    Whenever anyone says I am snob when it come to coffee I say "thank you" and take it as a great compliment!

    Cheers
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  36. #236
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    I like coffee (a lot), I'm very fussy where I buy it, but I ain't no snob. As to when I became a coffee drinker, it was the first time I smelt the aroma from a freshly opened packet of beans, I fell in love with the smell and still enjoy it just as much today.

  37. #237
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    When I was about 3 my mum used to give me sips of milky Nescafť. I loved it.

    By 16 I'd drink filter coffee at the local sports centre after a game of badminton. Then they bought an automatic cappuccino machine. It was awful but it was as good as I'd get!

    Through Uni I drank filter coffee to excess. My parents bought a filter machine which I would make horrible coffee in (still drank it!) I did a postgrad in hospitality management and worked in restaurants.

    In 1997 I came to Australia for a year and finally discovered proper coffee!!

    I passionately drank the stuff at work in the Sydney CBD and bought my first breville espresso machine in 1999 - it was awful and I sold it and bought a little shiny sunbeam in 2001. I still have it and it's a great little machine.

    In 2002 I bought a cafe in Annandale called "Bar sirocco" which I ran for 2 years before selling it. I became pretty good and very fast at making coffee.

    From then on I've loved making coffee...I upgraded to an em6910 in 2009 and am now looking to upgrade to a big boys machine soon!
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  38. #238
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    How i become a coffee snob...?

    Back in Philippines, I am always a frap lover of Starbucks (which i learn now a very crappy shop hehehe)

    And then my Ex GF in US started working as a barista and she always tell me story about her work and everything about her coffee experience at work. Since we are miles apart, i decided to get my self an entry level espresso machine to understand what is she saying and why she looks excited everytime she talks about it. I bought Sunbeam Piccolo and months later I upgraded to Sunbeam EM5600. I had a great experience with both machines which let me do a little latte art and latte etching. However the taste wasnt that good since I was only using an entry level of grinder as well.

    When i move here to Australia and had enough savings to get my self an espresso machine, i bought myself a Breville 800ES together with Breville dose PRO which later on i upraged to Isomac granmacinino. Again, after a months of no espresso making and latte art making, it took me weeks to make a perfect cup of coffee with latte art and with a great taste as well!

    And again after few months I decided I am ready to step up a little and get myself a BFC Splendor lever operated machine with Mazzer Mini. And now the REAL Coffee drink is always available at my own HOME! Not to mention, perfect espresso shot and smooth and silky milk every single time!

    I also entrolled myself to Barista class at Cosmorex to broaded my knowledge about coffee.

    I will just let my future decide where it will take me (but i hope i will get a barista job as well as a career change... from office job to coffee venture job since i feel this is what i love to do)... aja!! All is well hahaha!!!
    Dimal likes this.

  39. #239
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    I can remember vividly my first taste of coffee.

    My father was an officer in the Royal Australian Navy and he spent two thirds of the year at sea throughout my childhood. It meant that I spent a lot of time with my mother and sisters. My mother was a lot more permissive than a father that was used to detail, precision, rules and hierarchy.

    I was about 7 and my father had been at sea for 10 or so weeks. I'd noticed that mother had an attachment to coffee and the ritual surrounding it. I remember asking my mother if I could have a cup of coffee. She made me a cup of (presumably very weak coffee). It might have been weak and sweetened with sugar on the assumption I'd not like it otherwise, but there and then I was hooked.

    I work in a medical field where I've had many a conversations with addicts about their first experience of a drug - heroin, speed/meth, or cocaine. I've heard every variation on statements like (say, with heroin), "I can't describe how incredible that first rush was", or "Imagine the best sex you've ever had and multiple that by 20". People tend to recall where they were when they first used and who they used with. People describe sensory aspects of first use: the feel of a needle puncturing their skin, the smell of cutting up or heating a drug.

    My introduction to coffee was much like that of the addicts I've assessed and treated. I can remember where I was in our house and the conversation I had with my mother about coffee. I remember being both stimulated and relaxed by this thing called coffee, something that not many drugs do. I started being a regular drinker of coffee during (initially) the periods when my father was at sea. Eventually during shore leave he realised I was a coffee drinker at 7 or so; he'd accepted this after trying to impose a ban that he knew he was in no position to enforce.

    It's now hard for me to recall my life prior to coffee. I took at a Thermos of coffee to school throughout every year of high school and was considered a school oddity for doing so. While friends at university experimented with alcohol and illicit substances, I remained faithful to my own personal drug of choice. I don't drink; I have never had a cigarette touch my lips much less actually smoke one; I've never tried any sort of illicit drug.

    I share many attributes, beliefs and behaviours of those I've looked after with (other) substance use problems:

    -Incorporation of addiction into sense of self [I'm Scott, I'm a stoner / I'm Scott, I'm a coffee lover]
    -Obsessive preoccupation with the drug [Twitter following 878 like-minded gamer stoners / membership of coffee forum or a shelf of coffee-related books]
    -Compulsive use of the drug [Man I can only function on x cones a day / Thermos of coffee for the 45 minute commute to the hospital that I work in]
    -Loss of control over aspects of the use of the drug [A weekend bender / in Di Bartoli's shop yesterday to buy a Fausto grinder and today bought an Aqua Pro filtration system, cleaning cloths and digital scales from their on-line store]
    -Fetishisation of the drug and associated culture [Marijuana leaf t-shirt / portafilter key ring]
    -A rigidly held view that I am able to manage my addiction [I'm one of those junkies who can control their use / Coffee is a hobby, and it's good to have hobbies]
    -Cognitive structures that justify the use of the drug [There really isn't convincing evidence that cannabis is that bad for you / The medical evidence on caffeine and coffee doesn't show any convincing evidence of harm]
    -Preoccupation with being able to reliably access the drug [I don't want to go to hospital for my gall bladder; I can't tell them about the smack / A day trip to Bowral? Sure, just let me Google where there is decent coffee]
    -Defensive responses to third parties who express concern about drug use [I'm not alcoholic, I'm a social drinker / Sure I love coffee, but at least I don't smoke, drink booze or take illegal drugs]
    -Concern about ceasing or reducing use leading to withdrawal symptoms [I'd stop the hooch by I get too agitated / Recent advice from a GP, 'Let's do fasting blood sugar level and some lipids', which I didn't do because of concern about early morning coffee abstinence]
    -Acquisition of paraphernalia to assist/enable use [Home brew system, imported pipe / Profitec Pro 700, ECM Fausto, Espro/Pullman...
    -Association with other enabling users [Smokers outside a city office building / The Aroma Rocks Coffee Festival is in late July, isn't it?

    My name is Scott and I'm a coffee snob.
    Last edited by ScottyF; 26th June 2016 at 03:48 PM.
    trentski and KopiV like this.

  40. #240
    RFW
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    Thinking back, my love of coffee came at a very young age. I'd grab the bottle of percolated coffee from the fridge and pour it over some ice cream (must of been about 9 or 10). This was about 25 years ago, before an affogato was hip and cost $18 from the local cafe.

    My fully auto machine recently stopped working and all my Google-fu pointed me to this forum. So much great info and it was really useful in choosing new coffee making gear.

  41. #241
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    I became a graduate student and started this thing called coffee, and never looked back !

  42. #242
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    Didn't know anyone who drank coffee other then "43 beans in every cup". I got a job in Canterbury when I was 18 & started frequenting the local Greek cafe to have my daily sandwich on white bread!
    One day a guy pulls up in a black M3 BMW looking very dapper in his suit & orders a short black (Turkish Coffee), he downs his little cup, shouts "avtio" and walks out.
    I ordered one, thinking I could pull off the same style. I hated it more then words can describe, but boy did it give me a buzz.

    20 years later after working my through French press, Mocha pot, a cheap machine, a Fully auto "bean to cup" machine with "milk frother" to now an Astoria HX lever machine, commercial grinder and SCAA tasting chart on the wall.

    And I even love a great Turkish coffee when I can get one, but don't go out much because no one cares as much as me. I don't always get it right but a least I know the difference.

    Yes I'm a coffee snob!
    Dimal and readeral like this.

  43. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by Javaphile View Post
    New members can start a new thread anywhere other than in the For Sale and Good Coffee Where areas.


    Java "Welcome to CS" phile
    Now i know why i cant post in Good Coffee where yet

  44. #244
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    Well, it's all down to a Greek guy in Waterloo, NSW back in the mid 70's who ran a tiny outdated place using a till with pounds shillings and pence, a blackened 1920s fan for aircon and a large orange coffee machine with an impressive lever that he carefully produced coffee with. I had a take-away from him each morning as I made my way to work. Absolutely the best coffee I had had until then. I believe is was a latte / flat white brew but those names were not in use then and there - it was "just" a white coffee.

    I started drinking coffee in the early 60's in coffee bars frequented by "Rockers" in the South London area but remember more the bikes, riders and various "happenings" than the coffee. Then did the shared flat thing when the coffee was tinned instant Pablo or International Roast. Powdery stuff but better than tea. This was at the same time as coffee dispensing machines appeared in the workplace making the Tea Ladies obsolete unfortunately. Machines that somehow made the coffee, tea and soup they dispensed taste pretty much the same.

    Married and living in London we improved our coffee slightly with a plunger, fed using a grinder sitting on a box with a little drawer on the side - and shop bought coffee beans. We knew nothing about length of useful life of beans so really the flavour in the cup was little better than instant.

    Emigrated to Sydney in 1974 and found the Waterloo Barista and his magic brew. We tried a little harder at home after than and found that siphons work pretty well - but our knowledge of freshness of beans did not improve.

    After a move to Hobart in the mid-80s I succeeded in finding a number of coffee shops that produced a good brew. A latte before starting work while reading the newspaper became a solid habit - even if it meant cycling into the city well before work began to make time for it. And so things continued for several years. Coffee drunk in cafes while tea (and wine and beer) drunk at home.

    Then I retired and we moved to the north of the state. Bugger. All my favourite cafes were in the south and good local coffee rare. What to do. In 2010 I bought a Breville Roma and began my quest to produce a brew as good as the Waterloo Barista. After a few years of pushing the Roma to do what it could not do, I had killed it and moved on to an Infuser and Sunbeam 0480 grinder. This combo has been interesting and with a lot of pushing it is possible to get a good brew out of it. BUT by then I had joined CS as I knew there was more yet! So I purchased a Rosco hand grinder plus a brass Air PG and delicious espresso was forthcoming. But we also like a latte so a Bellman was added to steam the milk. Getting there.

    The next step was a Behmor Roaster. Another steep learning curve to get to a point where I know what to expect at the end of a roast. Hah - still getting there but generally things are good with the roasting!

    BUT now we have a spoiler. I have arthritis in the hands and can no longer work the Portaspresso system and so we are currently investigating HX machines and matching grinders. We have a Melbourne appointment with a Snobs Sponsor in October and hope to sort out what to purchase there. After that the Portaspresso system will be in the CS For Sale section while the Infuser (still working well after 3 years) and Sunbeam will be donated to a friend who introduced me to roasting with his poppers a couple of years back.

    Hopefully at last I will be able to match the memory of the Waterloo Barista - or will that be a faulty memory which keeps pushing the "remembered" flavour and texture always ahead of my current skill? Who knows.
    Dimal, Pretzal, Vinitasse and 1 others like this.

  45. #245
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Great story Ant...

    Mal.
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