Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 50 of 246
Like Tree39Likes

Thread: How I became a coffeesnob

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    2,574

    How I became a coffeesnob

    The moment comes in our journey through life when we spit the dummy and suck on the caffeine brew instead.

    Then our taste buds cry out for greater joy and we graduate to become coffeesnobs. We know we are....different from the rest who say "Ill put the kettle on and make a cuppa."

    We buy a coffee machine.

    When was that moment in your life? What convinced you. Why did you lash out and spend hundreds, or thousands of dollars? Thats an awfully big investment for something that costs, by comparison, a mere $3 in the shops.

    In my own case, I was happy with the stove top for espressos, but coveted a machine to make lattes for my wife. Little did I know then that machines were made for superior espressos.

    --Robusto



  2. #2
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    10,494

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I cant pinpoint a moment.
    There were several things that led to it.
    - My cousin had bought a machine.
    - My sister got a little Sunbeam of some sort.
    - Id seen the ads in the paper about learning to make coffee.
    - My job was made redundant and I had free time to do the course.
    - I had time to research equipment.
    - I found this site.

    Somewhere in all that something clicked.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    459

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    my epiphany was buying a grinder, then having a look on the internet to see whether Id made a decent choice (fortunately it was an OK choice). But then I started reading more...

  4. #4
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,077

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    For me it was beans.
    I had been using a plastic name brand machine. When it died, I graduated to a more expensive name brand machine and I was happy. I thought I made good coffee.
    Then I stopped working near my coffee supplier and was looking on line for a bean supplier.
    Came across an article on home roasting and it all sort of gained momentum from there.

    Brett.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    397

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I remember a long time ago, like 1976, in a distant galaxy, I was given a filter machine, that was when the journey began.

    From there it was a continuous learning and improvement, french presses, stove tops, grinders, espressos.

    Next episode...

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,881

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Great topic! *Can we get this turned into a sticky? (DONE! 2mcm)

    My coffeesnobbiness was ingrained into my personality from birth. *My grandmother and father pulled up their roots in Italy and moved to Australia with half of their village around the time of the Melbourne olympics. *Naturally, they presumed that Australia was a desolate wasteland and, so, each family brought with them the entire set of bialetti moka pots. *I dare say that there will be a few people on this forum who will fondly recall their Italian relos pulling out the moka pot at the drop of a hat. *Coming from a family that made their own pasta, as well as practically everything else that was consumed, it was only natural that I would work in hospitality to keep me going throughout school.

    The moment of catalysis was when I finished school and was forced to make a career choice. *My two interests were cooking and law. *I got into law and I knew that any part time job as a chef would never really amount to anything. *So I decided to continue working as a barista to keep me going throughout uni as a way to continue living through my palate. *A year or so in, I met Andrew Lew from Maltitude (now at Maling Room) and the rest is history.

    Cheers,

    Luca

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    203

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I guess this is the "Hi, Im _ _ _ _ _ and Im a coffee[s]holic[/s]snob" thread. ;)

    Around 1990ish I was given a couple of Belaroma vacuum bricks and a plunger. Before this my coffee experience was instant. For the next four years I experimented with different plungers, different coffees (mostly stale in hindsight). I didnt really know anyone with a deeper affection for coffee than this, so I didnt know there was anything more out there than this. A couple of years later I met a guy from Robert Timms, who was a taster / roaster. I got talking to him a little about coffee and told him about I coffee from the supermarket I liked, and he told me he could match the taste if I could provide him a sample. I never got this far, but his wife made the BEST tomato soup I ever tasted in their business at Cremorne, under the cinemas.

    In 1994 I moved to Germany, where no-one drinks instant coffee, but every house has at least 3 dripolators. It was at a Cafe in Leipzig where I had my first short black. Not long after this I purchased a "Cappucino" machine for about $50 (Deutshmark back then). WOW - real cappucinos at home.

    When I moved back to Australia in 97 I bought some Moka pots, discovered Gloria Jeans, and drank plunger coffee every day. I guess it was here I realised I was hooked. I just HAD to taste the Blue Mountain and Kona coffees that GJ sold. Somewhere here I bought/was given a spice grinder to grind my beans for the plunger. Somewhere about this time a mate told me when he was growing up his dad used to roast his own coffee? WHAT? ROAST? YOUR OWN? OH!!!!!

    In 2000 I bought my Napoletana espresso machine. With a grinder built in. Within a year or so after that I was roasting my own, buying my beans from where-ever I could get them, reading alt.coffee, going to the then not-so-busy Rocks Aroma festival. My friends thought I was crazy spending so much on another coffee gadget, but our place soon became the coffee house of choice for a number of friends.
    Fuzzy likes this.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,673

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I grew up drinking real coffee. Thanks to my dad who had travelled around Australia with his best mate and had worked with a heap of New Australians on the Ord River scheme in WA before I was born.

    I always remember the old stove top coffee percolater and watching it go glop glop glop as it perced the coffee every morning - and the smell was just devine. Dad and mum got their coffee at the Central market here in Adelaide and I can remember Dad buying it from the coffee importers.

    Then we moved to Port Lincoln when I was about 8 and the percolater didnt come out as often and my mother drank instant, the only time I remember the percolater coming out was when we had been to Adelaide and dad or mum managed to buy some beans.

    I moved back to Adelaide to work and one of the first things I bought was an aluminium moka pot which I had for years until I was given a small stainless steel one. I also had a plunger, which was used when the moka pot died and I could not afford to buy a new one. I also had my first job in a cafe using an old Gaggia lever machne, the thing was terrifying to use as it belched steam and made the largest racket when you used it - steaming milk was a real adventure ;D

    About 15 years ago I was given an old sunbeam espresso machine - now a garden ornament, it was pretty old when I got it and didnt last long so I went out and bought another moka pot.

    It was when we were in New Zealand in 1999/2000 the we found a brand new (still in box) phillips duo espresso machine at a car boot sale for $20NZ (yes $20).

    OG bught it and wouldnt let me touch it as it was his new toy. The thing was, I was the one who was able to get great coffee out of it so it soon became my job. Knowing that the blade grinder wasnt the best to use, OG invested in a brass turkish grinder for us to hand grind the beans. Much to my annoyance at times. After that it became our dream to own a real italian made machine.

    The old phillips did go to god eventually, and it was back to the old moka pots again and we accumulated various sizes.


    After my dad died, while I was cleaning out the shed (never again!!!) I found the old percolater which is now in our shed (I now know where my tendency to hoard comes from). I also inherited some $$$ and the first thing I did was go out and buy my Gaggia Classic.

    I knew I needed a decent grinder and started surfing the net. I found a good one for a reasonable price - in New Zealand - and sent the money off to a family member to send one over to me. Meanwhile I kept using the blade grinder as it was quicker than using the hand grinder.Them being disgustingly busy, this didnt happen so I started surfing the net and found coffeesnobs for grinder info.

    I started Home roasting after a few weeks, had the money sent back from New Zealand and bought my MDF grinder. I was hand grinding the home roasted beans because this really got the best flavour out of them.


  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    118

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I wasnt always a coffesnob. There was a time when i was a coffeeknob (aka coffee ignoramous). I once went into a caf and ordered, confidently, a "Long White". The girl at the counter just stared at me. Then she repeated, "A LONG white?". I said, even more confidently, "Yes please". She nodded and started making the coffee and i went and sat down. It was the best (and only) Long White ive ever had!
    My family never drank coffe and certainly didnt go to cafes for breakfast, so i didnt get my snobbery from there. My first induction into coffee was when i started working. As we all know, coffee makes the world go round -- would any work get done if not for the obligatory work coffee station? Our workplace had only instant, but we all drank several cups a day. Sometimes after work wed go to a nearby caf and i would usually be too afraid to order the mysterious macchiato or ristretto and opt for the much safer flat white or cappuccino. But i did wonder... what made a long black long? or a flat white flat?
    Then i went to uni and drinking coffee was very cool and very necessary. I moved to Newtown, where houses are sold with the slogan "Live the cafe lifestyle!" and i found the local roaster, Campos. In those days they roasted every Wednesday right there in the shop. The smell was sinful! The shop was tiny and pokey. Its walls adorned with coffe gadgets and paraphernalia old and new. I was entranced.
    My girlfriend, taking pity on me no doubt, bought me a Gaggia espresso machine and Breville grinder. I eventually ditched the grinder, which produced woodchips and bought my coffee pre-gound from one of two local roasters. I discovered the second roaster, Berados, while walking home one night after midnight. The shop, which had always appeared closed or abandoned during the day, was alive and roasting. I popped in the door which was ajar, and started chatting. I walked out of there with a small bag of warm freshly roasted coffee. While Campos make the best coffee ive had in cafes who use their coffee, Berados made the best coffee from my domestic machine. I only managed to catch them open one other time, and then, just as mysteriously as they had appeared, they vanished! If anyone knows whats happened to them, my espresso machine and i would dearly like to know.
    Last year I bought a conical burr grinder and so re-discovered the pleasure, and mess, of grinding your own.
    Im not sure i really am a coffee snob (kick me out now!). I still enjoy a cup of instant now and again (all those years of work on upteen cups a day) and instant has nostalgiac value as i used to drink it with me ol gran. But i could not for the life of me find a website entitled "Coffeebores" --- that would be my true home. Many a glazy-eyed dinner guest ive over-bored with my endless coffee talk!
    Rock on snobbers!

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    48

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    mean bean,

    Berardos closed down in Glebe but are now at the address below according to the white pages...


    Berardo Coffee Company
    208 Cleveland St Chippendale 2008

    Beanmeister.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    2,574

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Nice story, mean bean. You could just about savour the arome of the roasters.

    -Robusto

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    8

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    In the beginning God made Krupps, Krupps beget Sunbeam Grinder and then God sent his only son 9610 to save us sinners, this is when I saw the light, and now I follow in the path of righteous coffee snobbery :)

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,495

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by simo_02 link=1166962996/0#11 date=1168562407
    In the beginning God made Krupps,
    Are you sure it was God? ;)

  14. #14
    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Earth!
    Posts
    13,985

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by JavaB link=1166962996/0#12 date=1168563861
    Quote Originally Posted by simo_02 link=1166962996/0#11 date=1168562407
    In the beginning God made Krupps,
    Are you sure it was God? ;)
    It couldnt possibly have been, not if Krupps was the pinnacle of their creation. ;D :o ::)


    Java "Maybe if it had been a Cimbali." phile

  15. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    2,574

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    ....and on the fourth day, the demon, in the form of a snak, saind unto Eve, "Wassup, Eve? Can I tempt you with one of these twin-boiler volumetric numbers with electronic control...."

    And the rest is history.

    --Robusto

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    118

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Does anyone really believe the big G-man could have stayed up for 6 days in a row (working on his web-page "createtheuniverse.com") without the help of good coffee?

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    118

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by Beanmeister link=1166962996/0#9 date=1168493483
    mean bean,

    Berardos closed down in Glebe but are now at the address below according to the white pages...


    Berardo Coffee Company
    208 Cleveland St Chippendale 2008

    Beanmeister.
    The Cleveland Street address is where i bought my coffee from them and where i found them roasting after midnight like coffee elves. During the day, the shop would be closed, even during the limited "opening hours" stated on a small piece of cardboard stuck on the front door (11am-1pm Tues, 3pm-5pm Fri, or something like that), they would still be closed. The inside of the shop had a front and back section. The front had been decked out like a cafe, with counter, commercial espresso machine, and stools around the window benches. But it looked like someone had changed their mind about using it as a caf and the espresso machine had a cloth over it covered in dust, the stools were up-ended and unused. Junk and clutter was everywhere. Imagine a scene post-apocolypse, breaking into an abondoned warehouse, sweeping away the cobwebs and dust and wondering what this place was once used for. Now stop your day-dreaming and lets get back to talking about this cafe!

    Its true, they did have a cafe in Glebe before the premises (its the best term for it) in Chippendale, but i never lucked upon it. They (the coffee elves) told me they had wanted to focuss just on roasting. I imagine (no, not again!) that when they moved to Chippo they thought they might continue to have a cafe part of the business, but abandoned (quite literally!) that part of it and just focussed on roasting and wholesale. But now theyre gone. Gone, gone, gone. Im all aloooone.

  18. #18
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    10,494

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Found this story from 2004.
    http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/10/18/1097951625678.html?from=storyrhs

    Maybe hes gone back to Seattle.

    You could check Harris Farm Markets to see if they still stock his coffee and backtrack if they do.

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    48

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Hmmm, the plot thickens. I tried some of the coffee from Harris Farm Markets over Christmas when I didnt have any time to roast and Campos had closed but I dont remember seeing any reference to Berardos on the packet. Thought Id give it a go cos it had a roasting date on the one way valve bag. It was the Trieste Blend and I found it a bit over-roasted for my taste. Had to grind MUCH finer than normal and the coffee was almost black at the start of the pour. No real offensive taste but it all just tasted... dark. Having said that it did remind me of coffee Ive had in Haberfield in the past (but not Italy). Not having tried something I knew was Trieste before - perhaps this is what should be expected for this blend??

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    979

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Ive always liked coffee, I started on instant when I was about 12 years old. It was always funny the looks on my friends parents faces when I requested white with one at that age. :) my friends had juice. My first job was in a bakery/cafe now closed where I stared working when I was 16 part time. I worked their for 4 years and filled almost every roll their at some point. I started as a waiter, then did dishes for a while, learnt the ropes on coffee and by the time I left was a full time cook. during my time here I was lucky enough to get paid to go and do the 1 day espresso course at william angliss. opened up my knowlege to how espresso really works, ie how grind/dose and lenghth/volume of pour will affect whats in the cup. I had wanted to buy a machine of my own for a while and recently my girlfriend decided that I should get one for my birthday. I had often browsed the coffeemachines at department stores but never saw anything that I liked. the portafilters were all flimsy and
    the steam wands always had plastic on them, the only ones that I kindof like the feel of were the gaggias, (turns out my instincs were right) anyhow when I got serious about looking for a machine a did a web check and found this site. I now own a silvia 8-)

  21. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    42

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    My family were tea drinkers, we used to live on a farm in central Victoria. I started drinking coffee when I moved to Melbourne for work. I worked in Richmond and lived in Hawthorn somewhere along the line I discovered real coffee instead of instant. I still mostly drank instant until I discovered the Moka pot, I never did like plunger coffee. The wife had moved to drinking only moka pot but we live on the outer east of Melbourne now and I was not aware of any coffee roasters this far out so the coffee was supermarket stuff. Better than instant but.. :-/


    This was the way of it for several years till I found Coffeesnobs, I dont recall how I found the website but I have always had a bent for DIY and the green bean roasting idea was irrisistable. ;)

    To give an example of my urge to know how to do things from scratch I used to brew my own beer, not from the tins but from the original barley and hops etc, its actually quite difficult to do. The funny thing was Im not a big beer drinker and 2-3 dozen bottles every few months was ridicules and the misses put her foot down.

    Anyway I found coffeesnobs, started roasting, bought a Gaggia classic, discovered Aeropress am looking for a better grinder (soon) and am well on the way to being a though snob ;D

    And the wife loves the fresh coffee so I dont get any complaints about the 40+ kilo of beans in our store room, she even let me steal the bread maker :)

    Roasting coffee has been a great experience but I think that the character and personality of all the coffeesnob members is what really made me a coffeesnob. This is truly a rare and wonderful place. Thank you all.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    174

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    xmas 2006 my wife and i had respite through the council as we have a special needs child so we had lunch out and on th way home we called into clive peters just to have a look around this is hard to do with kids, i was looking at coffee machines when my wife called me down to look at this 50 inch hd lg plasma i was just joking around with the sales person an asked how much for cash mind you @$5000 he said $3600 my wife smiled and i said to her if you would like the plasma then i want a expresso machine so i can injoy one while watching a good movie when i have the chance true storie cheers steven poddy 66

  23. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,562

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Like that one Steven Poddy66 ... cool :)

  24. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,588

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by mean bean link=1166962996/15#15 date=1168716733
    Does anyone really believe the big G-man could have stayed up for 6 days in a row (working on his web-page "createtheuniverse.com") without the help of good coffee?

    Mean bean I have explored that question in depth!

    http://cafe-grendel.blogspot.com/2006/10/epiphany.html

  25. #25
    Banned
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    623

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    First started thinking about coffee at 15, when my Turkish boss brewed up a Ibrik and fired up the Hooka/Sheesha after work (at a Turkish Cafe where I washed dishes). Before that had tasted real coffee but never thought much of it.
    Well that became a tradition after work on the weekends to sit and drink coffee at 1 am watching the night life. As I worked there through school and uni I did everything in the kitchen and on the floor. Always cringed when I served espresso coffee because I knew I was just winging it.
    After uni I fellinto a job at a company called BurtenHollis as Operations Cadet. There I learned every aspect of coffee from cupping to roasting to blending to machines to production sheduling. 3 Years Later Opened Pioneer Coffee Roastery where we have picked up 5 fine foods medals in 1 year of entering these festivals.
    My life investment is huge in the industry and thats not even including the maltitude of grinders, pulverisers, pots, perculators and bits and pieces Ive aquired along the way.


  26. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,078

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    In a nearby suburb a long time ago.......

    I grew up in a house hold where my parents drank that wonderful concept called "international roast" and as a teenager with no money you put up with it but used to hang out for the parents to have friends over for dinner and then the real coffee would come out, of course it was purchased and ground in the supermarket but the aroma and taste from the percolater was sensational.

    Once i moved out and then got engaged we got a drip machine, used it for a while but didnt really bother too much as it was too much like hard work (young and stupid i guess)

    My brother then gave me a brew off his stove pot from what he called freshly roasted coffee (no i know a little different, he buys 3 to 4 kilo at a time of different so by the time they are finished they are definitely not fresh) but even then the flavour beat the hell out of instant and of course drip. *:)

    I then went and purchased my own stove pot, even to the point of buying a sunbeam electric one for when i went on holiday with the family, we did have a krupps machine but compared to my current baby it couldnt really produce anything other than dishwater. The electric stove pot also went with us when we stayed at the inlaws in the country, as you can imagine they thought i was a mad city boy.

    Purchased a grinder quite a few years ago, this sort of does the trick but but was advised that i should purchase one to match my current machine so will be purchasing a better one from Talk Coffee as soon as i have the funds.

    About a year ago we were given a low low low end sunbeam that was being thrown away and that got me back into the espresso and the like (not that this really made anything but dishwater) but at least i was buying fresh coffee from local suppliers near the victoria market (a great leap forward) but it died when the filter in the handle just jammed up so it went in the bin.

    Then last march i decided to go looking at machines, a friend had a ECM Giotto machine, quite funky to look at but ooooh the taste, real coffee *:o. So i then did some research on the NET about it all, found this forum and started reading.

    It was then i decided to buy my own and after saving, selling old computer hardware and the good ol tax return i purchased my own in October 2006. I also changed coffee suppliers to a wholesale coffee roaster via a contact and after missing out on my contact getting the coffee for me one day i decided to lob on the roasters doorstep and found i could buy green beans so i gave roasting a shot and now its the corretto or nothing ;)

    And that is my storey of how my taste buds got to have real coffee and for a fraction of the price i was paying for pre roasted coffee.

    So now if its not real coffee i wont drink it and i have nearly weaned the War Dept. off that other muck called Moccona so things can only get better.

    Yours in coffee
    Mal



  27. #27
    Senior Member askthecoffeeguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Preston, victoria, 3072
    Posts
    806

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I first started working in my uncles cafe, in Plimmers Steps in Wellington, as a wee 14yr old, a long, long time ago, before the cappuccino was born (at least in NZ, anyway) - where the choice of coffee was black or white.

    Then, in a fit of madness, I gave up coffee for 10 yrs, but quickly reverted when I began managing restaurants, and sometime along the way, I bought a Breville machine from a garage sale for next to nix, only to find that the only thing that it was good for, was making LSD (Latte Soy Dandy - oh yea of little faith!)

    Which led to a latter purchase of a well loved but also well maintained Baby Gaggia, which lasted well until I started doing catering for dance parties! *Then I lashed out on a Bezzera BZ99 and a Rocky grinder - and I have never really looked back since!

    And apart from owning my own cafe / coffee shop, my moment of epiphany came when I released that I could make a better cuppa for myself at home, at less than half the price, than 9 out of 10 cafes...

    And the rest, as they say, is history!

    Pat *

  28. #28
    Mac
    Mac is offline
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    3

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Quote Originally Posted by robusto link=1166962996/0#10 date=1168497079
    Nice story, mean bean. You could just about savour the arome of the roasters.

    -Robusto
    Yeah thats true.I like the way it is presented.
    Great

  29. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    43

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Started with my first trip to campos.

    At first I found the taste really strong and I wasnt sure if I liked it but by the time I finished the first cup I was like "daaamn that was good"

    This then became my saturday morning ritual. Get up, goto campos. After quitting my fulltime job to freelance from home. I became more of a regular. I had picked out the choice times to go to avoid the que of death (25min wait at times) it was either between 8-830 or 10:30 before lunch

    The I moved in with the girl (now ex) and we had moved away from campos so I prompted me to get my first machine and buy the beans in 1/2 kg bags. The gaggia classic and a delonghi kg100 (rebadged 166). From there came the wand upgrade and countless coffees until I got a certain bean from campos and the delonghi just couldnt cut it fine enough. That was the excuse I told myself to upgrade the grinder.

    Now I gauge all coffee including my own on a few places I goto to actually have coffee brewed for me. Many times I have taken a coffee back and asked for either my money back or to make a better one. Why should I pay good money for something that tastes like burnt milk and murky dishwater (not that I have drunk murky dishwater...honest)

    I am such a coffee snob...


  30. #30
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    13

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Came from when I was working in a remote part of Indonesia (West Papua).

    Our only options was the local instant or nothing. I reckon we might have had more flavour if we ground up the front door mat instead! We used to catch a charter flight back into Darwin arriving around 4am local time on a Saturday morning so we new we only had to endure another 3 or 4 hours before we could get a decent drop.

    When we came back to Australia we tried the instant again, but quickly went to ground beans. Looking forward to doing my own now.

    Cheers - Brett.

  31. #31
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    15,357

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Gday Brett..... Welcome to CoffeeSnobs [smiley=thumbsup.gif]

    Which part of West Papua (Irian Jaya) were you at there mate?

    Mal.

  32. #32
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    13

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Hi Mal,

    Thanks for the welcome. I was at Kuala Kencana (near Timika) on the Freeport mine site. I looked after the golf course working for Sheraton.

    Cheers.

  33. #33
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    15,357

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Sounds like a terrible life mate ;),

    I worked for a BHP operation just on the Irian Jaya/PNG border for nearly ten years.... A few of our people travelled west to work for the Freeport Project over the years. Not a bad part of the world really, very interesting :). Will look forward to reading posts about your journey through the world of coffee Brett as you get yourself set up. Happy brewing ;D

    Cheers,
    Mal.

  34. #34
    Senior Member smoky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Wauchope NSW
    Posts
    135

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I became a coffee snob when after a program on Pay TV about coffee, I decided on a whim to look on Ebay for a good priced beginners machine, and ended up with a De Longhi for $220, near new and unused.

    After trial and error with the machine, I was obtaining pretty good results, and bought my beans already done for a shop here in Dubbo, more expensive I found out, than ordering off the internet, which was my next step.

    Time to look at a model with separate steam so all could be done at once, and thats when budget dictated the Sunbeam Cafe Series, and could not be happier with the results, and now have regular hangers on I thought were freinds wanting just a coffee then their off again ::)

    The the rot started....found this site and on the green bean, roast myself bandwagon........havent looked back, and now, if the better half doesnt hang me first for suggesting it, Im looking at planting 2 coffee trees in the backyard :-?

    Oh for that fresh coffee each day.......3 or 4 or 5 or ...cups a day ;D

  35. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    122

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I became a coffee snob before Id even had good coffee.

    I had never really tried coffee until late 2001 when I was employed into an all female team (of about 11). *I was quickly introduced to the morning latte followed by discussions of shoes, handbags, and other types of interesting conversations. *One of the group was more disserning about her coffee and quickly became my coffee bud - possibly also because both of us were lactose intolerant. *One of our favourite cafes used Vitasoy soy milk which at the time was one of the few cafes not using soy life. *We took it apon ourselves to evangelise the coffee world and spent the next couple years travelling around Melbourne looking for NVC (non vitasoy compliant cafes) convincing them to switch to vitasoy with the promise that we would be back if they switched (and then rarely did). *By about 2003 most of the cafes within a 15 minute walk from work had swithed to vitasoy and we found new cafes opening up would be using vitasoy by default. *The guage for good coffee was a cafe that could make a good soy latte.

    One day I stumbled across coffee geek and read an article about Etiquette & The Ristretto Shot, looked on the forums and read about a cafe called Maltitude that apparently had the best coffee in Melbourne. *I ventured down to maltitude one morning on the way to work and met Andrew. *I dropped my usual line about which soy milk they used. *Andrew mentioned that they used soy life since most people wouldnt want to pay the extra that vitasoy costed (a usual reply Id become accustomed to hearing). *Remembering the Ristretto article I figured Id risk it and try my first ristretto. *Andrew instantly put his hand over the counter and said "Hi Im Andrew, whats your name?". *When the ristretto finally arrived I could see him watching me from behind the counter and I remember thinking whether I should sip it or drink it like a vodka shot. *I opted for the sip. *The flavour was so amazing beyond anything I could describe. *That moment set the bar on coffee for me and the soy latte was never ordered again (ok maybe a few times after that).

  36. #36
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    23

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    How did I become a coffee snob?

    I suppose it was through coffee where I found the cure for my daily migraine.

    Since I started drinking coffee from my old office in North Sydney (2003), I became hooked. Cibo in Walker St., North Sydney was beside the entrance to our office and its where I had my first taste of strong coffee. The baristas also became our friends. Then my workmates gave me a breville espresso maker which I used for about a year. I just drank illy maccinato everyday till my dad fancied my espresso maker. So I gave it to him. So the search for a new one started....

    ..then I stumbled upon this website. I scoured through the forums looking for an affordable, prosumer machine and I was directed towards the Gaggia Classic, Sunbeam 6910 or the Rancilio Silvia. Since the "mob" recommends the Silvia over the Sunbeam or Gaggia, I followed the "mob" and also from the "experts" review on several coffee sites. Since the "mob" also recommends a good grinder, I had to succumb and bought the complete Rancilio Silvia/Rocky combo with base. Then next was the LM pf from coffeeparts, then made my rancilio PF naked through a friend, then the Pullman tamper, freshly roasted beans from Alan (coffeeco.com.au), 7-day digital power timer, and now Im looking for a nice (ACF or Nuova Point) cup to complete my collection.... (it never ends).

    Now my wife complains that it takes me 30 minutes to do my coffee routine (preheat cup/pullshot/enjoy shot/clean) before going to work. How I wish she enjoyed coffee as much as I do but eversince I gave her a double shot cuppa, she cant forget the palpitations she had. So now its all mocha for her.

    Is this the usual journey of a coffee snob? If it is, then I guess Im one. ;)

  37. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    140

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Im a coffee snob because I lucked out and scored my $699 retail EM6910 for $350 from a (very) good friend! Since then (a little over 2 months ago) Ive evolved. I have always been a coffee drinker - well I thought I was a coffee drinker, but I was in fact a coffee ignoramus because I generally drank......dare I say it.....Instant!!!!! I now know that "instant" isnt coffee but a very poor substitute for what I now drink. In fact I have not been near instant since the day I plugged my machine in. The journey has been quick and steep learning curve...A worthwhile one however. One that I would not have begun had it not been for my friend selling me the EM6910 for half price. He actually scored it for nada (by redeeming his receipt on a gajillion $ air conditioner and got given a Sunbeam package - including the 6910) so he actually is $350 ahead in the deal... which could be debatable based on the coffee Im now drinking (he has a fully auto Saeco which makes crap compared to the 6910)

    Since then Ive purchased a grinder (EM0480), a Pullman Tamper (which I can honestly say has made a big difference to the consistency of my shots) and a French press for my work environment (they provide Nes-Crap-e bland 43) pretty much all based entirely on information received from CS.

    This website has provided me with the forum to discuss my techniques and read about others experiences with the joy that is Espresso. mmmm

    Im hooked :)






  38. #38
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    284

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I might as well contribute to this thread, as Ive been recently posting up a storm, in my search for a grinder.

    So when did I become a coffeesnob?

    I actually dont consider myself one yet! But having since read a heap on the internet from this site as well as other sites about what baristas do, I am on the quest to learning enough skills in order to make a good coffee. I dont really enjoy coffee for the sake of coffee, and I havent had one yesterday, so my drinking pattern is few and far between.

    What I want to be able to do is to master the Sunbeam EM6910 to be able to produce decent coffee for dinner guests. Kinda like how you dont have to be a big eater to be a great cook. I want to be able to make great coffees without being a great consumer of coffee, if that makes any sense.

    Anyway, the whole journey started when shopping around David Jones with a gift voucher card. I saw these shiny fandangled espresso machines, and they honestly looked like toys, plastic minaturised versions of whats in the cafes. I normally would dismiss such devices as another thing that will end up at the back of the pantry, collecting dust, along with the jaffa maker, the bread maker, the juice extractor, etc.

    But the Sunbeam caught my eye because it was rather bling and had a little "espresso" dial. Since I was a gadget man, this machine looked interesting enough to buy and try out.

    That was about the start of April 2007.

    So thats it - an interest in fancy gadgets has hooked me onto the coffee scene.

    Now my wife thinks Im mad, looking to buy a grinder but hopefully thatll help me in my quest to make a great cup of coffee. For dinner guests. :)


  39. #39
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Here goes;
    About 3 years ago I decided that the coffee I was getting at cafes was vastly superior to the instant see-rap I was drinking at home so I requested a coffee machine for my bay.
    We chose a Sunbeam which made brilliant coffee compared to the instant roast rubbish we were used to and then I made the (mistake?) of researching on the net (as I do with any purchase)
    At this stage I had decided to buy a S---o all-you-can-eat-a-matic as an upgrade.
    During my searches I stumbled across "coffee for connoisseurs" which had an in depth description of the Silvia. I then found coffeesnobs which also seemed to back the ability of Miss Silvia so I bought one (off a snob member)
    After about a week I decided it was total rubbish and looked at getting rid of it at all costs, I couldnt understand how my <$200 Sunbeam could outperform my >$700 Silvia !!!!
    So....I researched, and found that I could get good results through perservering with "Misss" quirks and buying half decent coffee. This led me to the next step of buying a grinder.
    After researching (surprise, surprise) I bought an Iberital burr grinder (doser - way less mess and Ive worked out how to use it to its potential v a doserless, but thats another story)
    Now my better half refuses to accept coffee from the law firm she works at via their 12k plus S---o industrial shiznit in lieu of my humble morning offerings !
    Now of course I have "upgraditis and want an EB-61 based machine with a better grinder (some day) so, thanks for feeding my addiction snobs ! I think a Giotto is out there with my name on it!

  40. #40
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    10,494

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Thats a good example fullbora of learning and perseverance.
    Its a common coffee journey story, but youve expressed it well.

  41. #41
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    2,322

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    nice thread!

    I got my start in coffee a few years back as a struggling uni student looking for a second job to keep me going. Knowing absolutely nothing about food, coffee and hospitality I applied for any job that came up. Saw the ad for a new cafe being built and thought why not? Had the interview and got the job as the barista....okay what the?? I know nothing about coffee, yet the manager saw something in me that told him I would be a good barista.

    Had a weeks training in another cafe before the grand opening. Back then I was working on a San Marino Lisa and a Mazzer Super Jolly. Realising I knew nothing about coffee during my training other than the mechanics of how to build drinks - what I appreciated as absolute basics, I decided to do some research. I was so engrossed and intrigued by how passionate people are about coffee, the complexities and subtleties of the drink, the technical side....I had to know more. I learnt all I could from everything I could find and read.

    2006 I purchased my first home setup - Silvia, La Cimbali Cadet and Sunbeam grinders.
    2007 I purchased a Sunbeam EM6910 and Mazzer Mini. Took the plunge in to home roasting and built a PID roaster.

    A few cafes later, Im working in a 90 kg a week cafe where I am respected as a barista and coffee is given the respect it deserves.

  42. #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,495

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Well its been a long journey for me.....

    Started many, many years ago whilst studying ..... engineering (specifically electronics and IT.... just as it started).... lots of coffee to make it through.... and it was instant in those days.....

    Then I purchased a pyrex stove top peculator with pre-ground (stale) beans - but thought the taste improvement was amazing!!! Even though these things stew the coffee over and over again -- it was sooooooo much better.

    From there there were filter coffee devices, dripolators and god knows what - anything I could get my hands on which made coffee.... but the beans were still supermarket preground (although some places had a grinder and you could buy your own whole beans and grind them - wonderful fresh coffee I thought I was getting in those days ::))...

    Then at the start of the 70s (or about that era)... tried my first real coffee..... a few cafes in Adelaide were catering for the Italian community..... WOW is that what real coffee tastes like........ I spent the next 20 years working for Foreign Affairs..... several trips a year O/S - mostly to Europe (including living in London for 3 years).... plenty of opportunity for great coffee in Europe (those morning coffees in Italy with a shot of liqueur ;) ;))...

    Bought my first espresso machine (a Krupps) when they went on sale in Australia.... and it was the only model available! Paid something absolutely ridiculous for it as I recall, the sales staff new nothing about it or how to use it.... so I just muddled through..... again using freshly ground (at the shop) coffee!!! It never made espressos anything like I could purchase at the cafes overseas (or even in Australia).... but I just figured thats the way it was......

    Then followed a succession of various espresso machines..... all small domestic versions..... there was greater availability of coffee..... sometime during this period grinders became available for home use..... and I got one as soon as I could.... my technique improved..... information started to appear on the internet during this period on coffee making which helped heaps... I started to get something which tasted like real espresso a few years ago...... During that time the quality at the cafes here in Australia was also improving....

    About 3 years ago bought a Solis SL90...... I then discovered my grinder wasnt adequate.... so found the second hand La Cimbali Jnr.....and got really good results from that combination.

    But even that didnt satisfy my desire to get even better coffee.... so I started the search for a second hand commercial machine..... purchased a bit over a year ago and began rebuilding... Whilst in the final stages I found this site..... and here I am....

    And thanks to the fantastic repository of information on the internet (especially here).... Im at last making coffee at home like that which I dreamt about making so long ago... :) :)


  43. #43
    Stew
    Guest

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I am a coffee snob for one reason only.....

    "Life is too short for bad coffee"

    Same can also be said about wine, beer and many of life other little wonders but this is a coffee site so it is all about the coffee.

  44. #44
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    169

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I should have probably replied to this thread when I first signed up.

    Started drinking coffee in my last yea of high school for the caffeine hit. I thought it was all pretty crap until I came to australia for university and found some good coffee.

    I became increasingly snobby and one day when it was time to retire one of my hobbies - I gave up competitive archery. I was looking for something to learn and figured, "what about coffee?" I wasnt actually planning to get a machine as soon as I did, but it turns out the basics of getting a good shot isnt that hard.

    I signed up here someone ago, but I have been lazy with reading the board.

  45. #45
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    10,494

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    So you went from one kind of shot to another.

    Ive tried a bit of archery.
    I find that if I "use the force" I tend to hit the bullseye more.
    Maybe I should try that with coffee.

  46. #46
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    4

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Hihi, Ill make the assumption that this is the introduction thread.

    I dont know if I would dub myself as a coffee snob just yet, but Im certainly taking steps towards being such. Coffee is a reasonably new thing to me. My sister and her husband recently (a year ago) invested in the franchise Michels Patisserie and since then I have worked there casually while at university. (Myer Center, for reference sake of the other Brisbanites out there)

    Prior to working at Michels I wouldnt have been able to tell you the difference between a Flat White, Latte or Cappuccino and its only recently that Ive begun to thoroughly enjoy coffee and make attempts towards increasing my skills at making it.

    Im very well aware that Michels Espresso is an excellent blend and the only thing holding it back is the execution of the baristas. As a result for my enjoyment in coffee, I intend to strive to improve everything that I can so I can dub myself as a talented barista.

    Ill also look into getting some pictures of my free pour.
    See what I cant learn from the other coffee lovers. :]

  47. #47
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    4

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I stopped drinking instant coffee after I finished my exams at high school. Quite a while ago now.
    My parents had bought a Krups espresso machine about the same time. Started going to cafes a lot more - found a few that werent bad either, in the city or down in South Yarra.
    I stopped drinking coffee altogether at home - decided it was all to hard.
    My espresso drink of choice was the flat white - but about 12 months ago, I started to notice something - more and more cafes were either giving me a latte in a mug - or just serving me sort of coffee flavoured hot milk. Neither of which was what I was after.
    So I started ordering just long black. Now, this was different - lots of flavour - but still, many places had difficulty serving one of those properly too.
    So about 6 months ago I went down and bought myself a "temporary" cheap espresso machine, and some preground coffee. Now, this was more like it! My coffee was up to the standards of a lot of the cafes I had been visiting.
    Then my cheap machine started leaking. Searched the internet to see if this was a common problem, and found this site. Was almost overwhelmed by the number of people saying "buy a grinder!" So I bought a grinder. And have ordered a pullman tamper. And fitted non-pressurised baskets. And have improved my technique dramatically - and I think am making better coffees than almost any cafe I regularly visit. Still have my cheap espresso machine, but that will change at some point in the future.
    Soon I will be looking at roasting my own beans. The endless pursuit of perfection!

  48. #48
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    3,007

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    I started my journey when my son asked me to research an espresso machine for him, I went online and found info on boilers, thermoblocks etc etc. While checking out machines at Harvey Normans I decided I needed a machine as well, so I purchased a Saeco Via Venezia, this opened up a whole new world to my wife and I, going from instant coffee to capucinos, lattes etc. Started off with supermarket Lavazza espresso ground coffee, at this stage it tasted great, then I started buying beans at Liquorice at Carine (Rubra) and noticed a marked improvement straight away. I have since purchased a grinder, again an improvement. I am now saving my pennies towards a Rancilio Silvia which I hope to purchase in the not too distant future. Until then Via Venezia will suffice. I am now very choosy when I go to cafes, most places serve up hot milk that they call coffee but there are are few new places that serve real coffee.....................bye for now
    Greenman

  49. #49
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    36

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    1980s... instant, thats all we had ? (hey, I was a teenager)
    mid 80s ... plunger coffer
    90s ... real espresso in cafes. I drink flat white, i cant understand why ppl drink cappucino with the choc powder on top, yeuck.
    2000... got a little krups at home espresso machine, and little grinder
    2000 ... married non-coffee drinker.
    late 2000 ... introduced him to affogatos.
    2001 ... slowly convert him to mochas. trip to Italy introduces us to the true joy of a short black.
    2002 ... upgraded Krups, but soon got frustrated and stopped drinking coffee at home
    2003 ... amongst baby making years dreaming of opening a cafe
    2003 ... husband now drinking flat whites
    2005 ... started own retail shop and "had to" purchase a DeLonghi automatic domestic machine, which I loved, even though its milk frothing was not as good as with a wand
    2007 ... when cafe round the corner closed down I jumped at the chance to finally indulge my dream and open my own cafe

  50. #50
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    7

    Re: How I became a coffeesnob

    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Well I drank instant as a teenager but stopped back in 1980.

    Became a instant snob in 2000 when we moved to a farm that had few coffee trees, thought I had better learn to do something with those red cherries. 2001 we bought a cafe so we could convert it to another business. What a shame it came with a 2 year old top of the range 2 group Boema and all the other gear. 1 instant cafe in my house :) :)
    Now all I need is a pulper so I can get at those green beans faster, and a 1 Kg roaster then I think Ill be set.

Page 1 of 5 1 2 3 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. New coffeesnob, what to buy?
    By gazzalp in forum Brewing Equipment - Entry level (sub $500)
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 22nd June 2012, 12:48 PM
  2. Help for CoffeeSnob currently in Philadelphia
    By Dorf in forum General Coffee Related...
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 26th June 2006, 01:55 PM
  3. You know your a CoffeeSnob when...
    By Andy in forum General Coffee Related...
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 31st May 2005, 08:28 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •