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Thread: Best green beans?

  1. #1
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    Best green beans?

    Hi everyone,


    I have a basic question. I want to roast for my own cafe. What are the best green beans i can get. What are the best green beans that goes together with a blend.


    Shall i just roast a single origin one or create a signature blend.I know it is quite insane apart all the varieties out there. However, i dont have 2 lives to experience all.


    If you can advice me on these sort of things, it will extremely help me.


    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Senior Member trentski's Avatar
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    There were some $600 a kilo beans purchased by a guy in sydney the other day. They would have to be up there.

    Geisha and jamaican blue mountain are the most expensive, not sure if that makes them the best. Also some good stuff out of Kona.
    Wynton87 likes this.

  3. #3
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    "Best" is a relative thing. It depends on the customers you have. I like washed coffees from Latin America and the occasional citrus blast from Ethiopia. Others prefer a bolder spicier espresso shot from a natural process bean with a stronger roast. A Vietnamese or Indonesian customer might like a more pungent origin like Sumatra or a monsooned coffee (the latter reminds me of the stuff used in c ph sữa đ).

    The origin that I find pleases the most people is Colombian with its chocolate-caramel tones and clean aroma and palate on a lighter roast, and the Vulcan Galeras offered by Andy is a bean I find easy to roast using both the pan and the popper and that has these characteristics. For some reason I rarely see it listed at cafes, perhaps because the baristas get bored or it's not really famous and prize winning. But the customers have only one or two coffees a day. We don't get bored.

    Thinking back of Yirgacheffe and other more out there origins makes me think of what a beer seller told me about IPA, that the hipsters liked theirs really bitter and hoppy, whilst the mass market preferred less bitterness and flavour. This was great because I have mass market tastes in IPA and I saved a lot of money not buying the expensive stuff. Unfortunately I also have expensive tastes in coffee and burn money there instead.

    I still remember buying my first JBM sample pack (couldn't afford the full thing as a student) and the high expectations being cold-showered away by blandness and the slight mustiness of beans beginning to get stale. I've had a grand total of one great Kona in my life, and one pack of great Kona beans - the farm that sent it had some trouble with weather and mud flows and the next pack's beans had not been washed and dried properly (according to my roaster) and were quite bland and off. I travelled to Hawaii and never managed to get a single decent cup of coffee; all the beans on sale had 1+ year expiry dates for roasted stuff, or had been roasted several months ago, and of course Americans seem to like their roast on the burnt side of charred. Same with Kopi Luwak. You expect this transcendental experience and it's just an alright cup of Indonesian coffee.

    I've yet to have Geishas, mostly cos I can't justify the cost even for one cup ($17 at the one roaster I trust for the Hiacienda La Esmeralda, no cheaper options offered). Not having had it I wouldn't buy it as a large pack, and I agree with Andy now that you want to experiment a lot before you find what works for a bean, even the 1kg pack is a bit small (I'm almost done with the 2.5kg of the VG and only in the last couple of roasts have I found happiness).

    There's a few origins like Brasil that regularly return at cafes drawn, I'm guessing, by either the cheap price per kg of the beans or something of a story to tell (e.g. the "elephant beans" of Maragogype). Well, I have nothing to say about the former, and the latter is always disappointing because you think somehow the story will make it taste better and if you are objective about it, it doesn't. Better get something that works well and focus on freshness, good roasting, good technique on pouring the shots and so on. I think. As a customer.

  4. #4
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    You might want to look into q grading and the ratings

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by apicius View Post
    "Best" is a relative thing. It depends on the customers you have. I like washed coffees from Latin America and the occasional citrus blast from Ethiopia. Others prefer a bolder spicier espresso shot from a natural process bean with a stronger roast. A Vietnamese or Indonesian customer might like a more pungent origin like Sumatra or a monsooned coffee (the latter reminds me of the stuff used in c ph sữa đ).

    The origin that I find pleases the most people is Colombian with its chocolate-caramel tones and clean aroma and palate on a lighter roast, and the Vulcan Galeras offered by Andy is a bean I find easy to roast using both the pan and the popper and that has these characteristics. For some reason I rarely see it listed at cafes, perhaps because the baristas get bored or it's not really famous and prize winning. But the customers have only one or two coffees a day. We don't get bored.

    Thinking back of Yirgacheffe and other more out there origins makes me think of what a beer seller told me about IPA, that the hipsters liked theirs really bitter and hoppy, whilst the mass market preferred less bitterness and flavour. This was great because I have mass market tastes in IPA and I saved a lot of money not buying the expensive stuff. Unfortunately I also have expensive tastes in coffee and burn money there instead.

    I still remember buying my first JBM sample pack (couldn't afford the full thing as a student) and the high expectations being cold-showered away by blandness and the slight mustiness of beans beginning to get stale. I've had a grand total of one great Kona in my life, and one pack of great Kona beans - the farm that sent it had some trouble with weather and mud flows and the next pack's beans had not been washed and dried properly (according to my roaster) and were quite bland and off. I travelled to Hawaii and never managed to get a single decent cup of coffee; all the beans on sale had 1+ year expiry dates for roasted stuff, or had been roasted several months ago, and of course Americans seem to like their roast on the burnt side of charred. Same with Kopi Luwak. You expect this transcendental experience and it's just an alright cup of Indonesian coffee.

    I've yet to have Geishas, mostly cos I can't justify the cost even for one cup ($17 at the one roaster I trust for the Hiacienda La Esmeralda, no cheaper options offered). Not having had it I wouldn't buy it as a large pack, and I agree with Andy now that you want to experiment a lot before you find what works for a bean, even the 1kg pack is a bit small (I'm almost done with the 2.5kg of the VG and only in the last couple of roasts have I found happiness).

    There's a few origins like Brasil that regularly return at cafes drawn, I'm guessing, by either the cheap price per kg of the beans or something of a story to tell (e.g. the "elephant beans" of Maragogype). Well, I have nothing to say about the former, and the latter is always disappointing because you think somehow the story will make it taste better and if you are objective about it, it doesn't. Better get something that works well and focus on freshness, good roasting, good technique on pouring the shots and so on. I think. As a customer.


    Thanks a lot for this valuable advice,

    I will consider what you have said. Right now, I have to broaden my knowledge in the varsities of coffee available worldwide because I have very little knowledge.

  6. #6
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    I am also in the pursuit of my favourite green bean. Ive looked up origin taste guides to give me a bit of an idea of what you can typically expect from a region but I expect that won't be like choosing your favourite flavour and getting it everytime.. So I've resorted to the long game, choosing a different green bean each month and giving it a crack (pun intended).

    I have this dream that I will make notes on the major taste characteristic of each bean I try at different roast levels then combine different characteristics that I think could work well together..... but in reality I'm sure i'll just be crossing with my fingers that i'll fluke the perfect roast one day and i'll hear the sounds of angels singing as I lift this perfect roast into the sky while a crowd gathers to witness its beauty.

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