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Thread: Why do you home roast?

  1. #101
    Junior Member alfadrian_syah's Avatar
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    Re: Why do you home roast?

    Quote Originally Posted by link=1211177202/2#2 date=1211178391
    Interesting question.

    Why do I do it? Theres so much good brown stuff around - if you know where to look ;). So why do I spend so much time and money turning green beans brown?

    Honestly, I started because I was curious to see if I could do it.

    But I got hooked. So many variables. Origin, varietal, roast profile, blending ...

    A delightful fusion of science and art. Its just too interesting, and the results too enjoyable, to stop. *:D
    excellent...
    home roasting...its good.. :)

  2. #102
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    Re: Why do you home roast?

    after reading up and hearing ever ones enjoyment in roasting thought i would try it myself found a second hand popper

    and some ethiopian harrar beans love the taste of these crossed my fingers and filled the popper and 12 mins and nice dark beans and was hooked also the smell has me addicted six roasts in and hooked :) :)

  3. #103
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    Re: Why do you home roast?

    The same reason I brew all-grain beer. The satisfaction of making something for myself.

    Also because I dont get through much coffee at home (advantage/disadvantage of working right near Ristretto Coffee Roasters Howard St espresso bar!), so its nice to know I can roast small batches regularly and not waste so much coffee!


  4. #104
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    Re: Why do you home roast?

    Needed fresh roasted to enjoy my passion for espresso.Found Mark at coffee roasters and came away with baby plus referral to CS for beans.Over 15 months of roasting {12kg} I now have added correto and KKTO .i cannot survive without KKTO CS logger and Andys fab bean selections

  5. #105
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    Re: Why do you home roast?

    Primary reason for home roasting for me is that I like the satisfaction of doing things myself, which also extends to other cooking processes such as fresh pasta, sourdough bread, sausages, ice cream etc
    The fact that green beans are significantly cheaper also helps, as does the not having to worry about running out because I can roast small quantities often as needed.

  6. #106
    Senior Member Thirteen13's Avatar
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    Re: Why do you home roast?

    for me roasting is done for a few reasons:

    I like to do everything as much as possible.
    I grow my own vegetable garden so the spent coffee pucks get used as garden fertilizer, which is a bit more eco friendly.
    The cost saved in buying green beans.
    The cost of not having to buy roasted coffee
    The freshness of the roast
    The ability to control the roast
    The availability of having freshly roasted coffee
    The enjoyment of watching them transform
    Being able to do it yourself

    So as you can see there are many reasons why i enjoy doing it i am sure the majority of you here share the same views.

  7. #107
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    Re: Why do you home roast?

    Quote Originally Posted by 4874756E687979722D2F1C0 link=1211177202/105#105 date=1334192139
    i am sure the majority of you here share the same views.
    I do.

  8. #108
    Senior Member Mariner's Avatar
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    Re: Why do you home roast?

    Quote Originally Posted by 1F2322393F2E2E257A784B0 link=1211177202/105#105 date=1334192139
    So as you can see there are many reasons why i enjoy doing it i am sure the majority of you here share the same views.
    Here, here - I certainly share the same view. I would add - sharing a brew you roasted yourself with a friend and seeing them enjoy it as much as you. Well put Thirteen.

  9. #109
    Senior Member Thirteen13's Avatar
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    Re: Why do you home roast?

    Quote Originally Posted by 6C4053484F4453210 link=1211177202/107#107 date=1334204518
    Quote Originally Posted by 1F2322393F2E2E257A784B0 link=1211177202/105#105 date=1334192139
    So as you can see there are many reasons why i enjoy doing it i am sure the majority of you here share the same views.
    Here, here - I certainly share the same view.* I would add - sharing a brew you roasted yourself with a friend and seeing them enjoy it as much as you. Well put Thirteen.
    Yes thats another strong point, everyone who has sampled my home roasts there reaction is always
    "Oh wow, thats very nice, and you did that all yourself"

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  10. #110
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    Re: Why do you home roast?

    i roast because its more economical and the results are as good as any coffee i have tried
    if i couldnt roast i would be constantly looking for fresh beans and the effort would eventually wear thin
    i see so many people line up to buy a coffee on the way to work because they cant produce the coffee at home---we know better and i thank coffeesnobs for that

  11. #111
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    I don't home roast, but am seriously thinking of buying the Behmor!

  12. #112
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    All of the above plus it allows me to get out in my man shed and escape the housework!

  13. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianleon View Post
    i roast because its more economical and the results are as good as any coffee i have tried
    if i couldnt roast i would be constantly looking for fresh beans and the effort would eventually wear thin
    i see so many people line up to buy a coffee on the way to work because they cant produce the coffee at home---we know better and i thank coffeesnobs for that
    I second this!! In fact I get much better coffee than any other commercial bean that I've tried and it works out much cheaper.

  14. #114
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    I roast because (1) the coffee is fresher, (2) I don't have the time to search out fresh roasted coffee beans, (3) it's a hobby, (4) my coffee is better than what I can get in the local cafes (i'm always comparing their coffee to mine), and (5) I'm cheap and can roast my own beans for 1/3 (or less) of the price of store bought beans. We were buying a well-known brand of beans at $46 a kg which gets pricey (at $185 a month). Given those prices, it didn't take long for the Behmor to pay for itself. Plus there is the satisfaction of DYI. Now if I could only grow my own coffee beans I'd be self sufficient.

  15. #115
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    Hi all,

    I'm very very new to coffee roasting, so for me roasting at home means seeing what I can come up with, experimenting, creating different blends of scent, taste and feeling and not feeling embarrassed when I screw things up because no one is around!

    However I do need great advice about where to buy decent quality beans from within the Melbourne area...! Much appreciated.

  16. #116
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueCoffee View Post
    However I do need great advice about where to buy decent quality beans from within the Melbourne area...! Much appreciated.
    Have you explored the BeanBay tab at the top of the page? Lots of Green Beans to choose from there!

    Here's the link to get from here to there quickly! CoffeeSnobs - BeanBay
    smokey likes this.

  17. #117
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    I roast because i get to choose wonderful single origins from all around the world every week.
    I consume them a week later and i know the coffee will always be fresh
    also its pretty cheap at 10-15/kg

  18. #118
    Junior Member Salgar's Avatar
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    I (just) started roasting for all the above reasons (freshness, not wasting beans, varieties of beans, search for new flavours, something I've done myself) and also in the hopes that one day my wife will agree that I've saved enough money on the beans to buy a real espresso machine.

  19. #119
    Coffee Nut fg1972's Avatar
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    Few reasons for me,
    * Sick of inconsistent flavours from the local roaster who for years did a great job (the old man is a coffee nut like me) but since handing over his business to a family member (she's not a coffee nut) the coffee consistency/quality/freshness is a bit up & down.
    * Can't be bothered constantly trying new suppliers and dealing with people who,
    A: Don't really have a passion for quality coffee.
    B: Are a bit too fancy making coffee a lot more complex than it really is for no real benefit to the palate but instead a resulting taste of lemons.
    * Producing coffee exactly to suit my own taste and can tweak as required.
    * I like the challenge, and self satisfaction.
    * Wow factor from friends and family who taste my coffee.

  20. #120
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    Quick hijack: Looking to get into home roasting. Does anyone have a great article/link explaining the process in detail, then what you can get away with using the popper method?


    It appeals to me because of a) freshness, and b) cost
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  21. #121
    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thegoner View Post
    Quick hijack: Looking to get into home roasting. Does anyone have a great article/link explaining the process in detail, then what you can get away with using the popper method?
    Hhhhmmmm......How about the sticky in the Roaster section titled A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper.


    Java "Amazing!" phile
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    Toys! I must have new toys!!!

  22. #122
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    Apologies for not seeing that. I am primarily a tapatalk user, the stickies only show up if you arrive at the subtopics via the menu.

  23. #123
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    Initially it was cost ($15/kg instead of $30+/kg is pretty compelling). Now it's the level of control I have over the final taste of the cup, matching roast level to the bean type and brewing method.
    Last edited by flarets; 14th May 2013 at 01:49 PM. Reason: better price estimates!

  24. #124
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    I have only recently started roasting, wish I had discovered roasting long ago, but plenty of time to make up for lost time. I bought a Behmor from CS and cannot believe how easy it is.
    As to why I started to roast, well the reasons seem to keep growing, initally it was because I love trying different coffees, I want fresh coffee, the cost effectiveness (or so I beleive).
    Now I can add roasting to the reason I want to roast, being able to try different roast profiles, I have not blended yet, but that is on the cards.

    I can see myself gaining quite the collection of green beans.

  25. #125
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    I enjoy the learning process - starting with a good base bean & blending with others to create something that is entirely yours. I keep notes of all blends, let them rest for approx. 10days and enjoy

  26. #126
    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    Cost, freshness, convenience and the ability to tailor the roast to my tastes.

  27. #127
    Junior Member goodbyesoberday's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MrJack View Post
    The same reason I brew all-grain beer. The satisfaction of making something for myself.

    I was thinking exactly the same thing when I read the thread title. I started brewing beer at home to save money, to learn a new skill, to (re)create a world of flavours not available on my doorstep, to enjoy it fresh and to try to truly understand what it was I was drinking. I ended up turning that into a career.

    Much the same with coffee. Good quality beans in variety are too far away from where I live and my coffee drinking habits make purchasing roasted beans an expensive exercise. A five dollar popper purchase at a car park market and I'll never look back, though I've got a long way to look forward...

  28. #128
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    Wow, good reason and surprisingly you still keeping picture that old.

  29. #129
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    I'm not sure that cost's are that much cheaper now. Like many popular hobbies out there, cost rise as popularity increases.

    I enjoy learning new things. I cook a lot. So it lends itself to experimentation in other realms. So I started on a whim & was looking for a less expensive hobby. I can roast small batches of green coffee beans on the stove & enjoy a good cup of coffee at home when ever I want.

    I'm looking into creating a coffee roaster that I can use interchangeably with a NG stove top & a NG outdoor grill. Also want to be able to roast a pound of beans at a time instead of the small amount I now roast. This is a part of the appeal.

  30. #130
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    Hi all you happy roasters out there.
    I'm a newbie at this, have never roasted and am thinking about it, one reason is for the cost as I find ready roasted is costing me more than $30 per kilo and what I see on here green beans are about $10 per kilo! I find we are going through 1.5kg per month. which works out to about $50-60 per month just on beans + freight. But I see on here that some of you mention that its no cheaper roasting your own. Am I missing something?

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    can someone also steer me in the right direction for getting a roaster, I live on the sunshine coast in Qld.

  32. #132
    Senior Member noonar's Avatar
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    According to my 4th grade costings from info gleamed here and other sites and my own experiences - I make roughly 21 large flats per 7 days, about 500gms of beans. Roasting + brew elec + spring water + milk, equates to $21 approx. and varies. No deprecation etc just the simple stuff costed - I am not a bean counter. Cost to buy 21 large flats in Perth - mortgage - and you get what you get wherever you go - unless you go somewhere like antsinyapants, consistent drinkable retail brews are woeful and unidentifiable. So may reasons to home roast, so few to not.

  33. #133
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    In the long run roasting your own is cheaper once the equipment costs are covered by the savings.
    Deciding on a budget is your first step. You could also consider whether you are a tinkerer or an 'out of the box, plug and play" person.

    You may want to go the corretto, or popper path and there are plenty of threads about those methods, if you use the CS search bar.
    If you want something pre-manufactured then I can recommend the Behmor, available at CoffeeSnobs
    by clicking on the icon at the top of each page, as the most value for money.
    My son has one and I can vouch for the results. It is a very effective roaster delivering results that are very balanced and
    about as close to commercial drum roasting as you can get in such a small package. The options are by no means limited to the above.

    I guess you have done some reading about home roasting, there is plenty here at CS.
    Starting isn't always easy but if you have a good understanding of making coffee and know what you like, then you will have a target.

    As far as beans go, there are plenty of great beans in Bean Bay. There are NO bad beans in BeanBay, some you will like more than others, perhaps.
    Reading different posts suggests that it's not necessarily easy for everyone to achieve great results with every bean, right from the get go.
    If you don't like a particular roast, try not to blame the bean, be patient and roast it again to a different profile.
    The Peru, in BeanBay, is a good beginners bean.

    It's important for you to log your roasts in some way, a lot of us use the Data Logger, available in BeanBay and load the free CoffeeSnob
    software on to a PC. Easy, effective and a great tool for consistency, reference and your personal roasting journey.

    Be patient, be curious, ask questions and read as much as you can.
    It is one of the best things in life, as a coffee drinker, to enjoy beans that you have roasted yourself and to see smiles
    of sheer amazement on the faces of friends and family when you can tell them that the coffee they just had and really liked was roasted by you.

    They will also start to wonder why the coffee down the street is so bad. (mostly....;-D )
    Once on the journey you will never look back.
    Maybe people you know will want to buy some of your roasts.............. then it will pay for itself! ;-D


    Ask questions, enjoy the journey.

    Cheers

  34. #134
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sailor View Post
    Hi all you happy roasters out there.
    I'm a newbie at this, have never roasted and am thinking about it, one reason is for the cost as I find ready roasted is costing me more than $30 per kilo and what I see on here green beans are about $10 per kilo! I find we are going through 1.5kg per month. which works out to about $50-60 per month just on beans + freight. But I see on here that some of you mention that its no cheaper roasting your own. Am I missing something?
    Well, the quantities ordered will affect your landed cost. I recently ordered 7.5kg green (mixture of cheap/dearer beans), delivered cost = $108.10, which equates to $14.40/kg. So for 1.5kgs that is $21.60.

    Now, to buy a Behmor for approx $400 delivered, and assuming you get at least 2 years life out of it, gives monthly depreciation of under $17.00

    Power at approx 0.5kwh per roast, assuming 5x 300g roasts (can do larger) and 25c per kwh price = $0.62

    One-way valve bags (5 of them assume re-used at least once) average use cost $0.25, x 5 roasts $1.25

    All up about $40 for your 1.5kgs, and I've ignored the 2.5kg of free beans you get with the Behmor. YMMV.

    If I'd stuck to $10 beans the averaged delivered priced would have been $12.40/kg

  35. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by sailor View Post
    can someone also steer me in the right direction for getting a roaster, I live on the sunshine coast in Qld.
    Have you considered the KKTO roaster?
    The creator @Koffee-Kosmo is a member on here and lives in Brisbane...
    As a bonus, it can comfortably roast 1kg batches, so might save on upgradeitis for a while anyway.....
    There are a number of threads on here about the roaster if you want to read up more...

  36. #136
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sailor View Post
    Hi all you happy roasters out there.
    I'm a newbie at this, have never roasted and am thinking about it, one reason is for the cost as I find ready roasted is costing me more than $30 per kilo and what I see on here green beans are about $10 per kilo! I find we are going through 1.5kg per month. which works out to about $50-60 per month just on beans + freight. But I see on here that some of you mention that its no cheaper roasting your own. Am I missing something?
    In simple terms, roasting your own can save you money, but generally will not right away.
    This is only one factor though and it probably will not be the most important one.
    My main reason for doing this for so long is the results. As long as it tastes good, I'm going to keep doing my own where possible.

    As mentioned by others, for cost you do need to factor in other things.
    Often people start small with something like the starter pack and a popper.
    For a small outlay, this will give you a feel for whether you think home roasting is something you WANT to do. Quite seperate from the issue of money, it has to be something you actually want to invest the time and effort into as well.

    Also, note that when you roast coffee, you lose around 14-17% mass, so to get a kilo of roasted beans actually takes more like 1.2kg of green beans. EG: $10 per kilo becomes $12 per kilo.

    If the roasting bug cacthes you, what generally happens is that you spend a bucket of money on more beans than you really need (I have 50kg on hand at present) and on roasting apparatus.
    What you roast with can range from something you knocked up for free using scrounged parts, all the way through to purpose built roasters. Personally, over the last 11 years, I have gone from popper, to Imex CR-100, to 2nd Imex CR-100 when I broke the first one, to SS mesh drum to bigger SS mesh drum.

    Do I save money roasting my own - Hmmm. Hard to say. I can certainly roast beans for a cheaper per kilo cost than I can buy the same/similar, but then I do tend to be the supplier to the family members, which does not always mean a financial transaction. So... kind of!

    Enjoy.

    Brett.

  37. #137
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    Now, to buy a Behmor for approx $400 delivered, and assuming you get at least 2 years life out of it
    I would have thought it likely to get more than 2 years from a Behmor, especially given the modest 2kg/month output. ??
    I've seen Andy in action at M.I.C.E. ....... half a lifetime of coffee, in just a couple of days.... (well, yeah....I exaggerate ;-D but dozens upon dozens of roasts)

    Level of use, care and cleaning, repairs and maintenance should get you more than 2 years.

  38. #138
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chokkidog View Post
    I would have thought it likely to get more than 2 years from a Behmor, especially given the modest 2kg/month output. ??
    Sure....but I did say 'at least'....and I didn't factor interest etc into my stylised, while eating lunch at desk, model

    A well looked after machine should last well in excess of the 2 years, but the chance of user error (i.e. 'Oh my god the chips!') is non-trivial.
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  39. #139
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    I love walking past the tea/coffee aisle in the supermarket, with distain. I get my ego stroked by compliments of my roasts. It puts me in touch, in an admittedly tenuous way, with the Tanzanian/Yemini/Vanuatuan etc. producers of the magical beans we ultimately consume. David Suzuki recently lamented (quite eloquently) how the global economy has divorced consumption from the havoc it visits on the planet. Roasting my own salves my conscience a little, I guess. see Video Highlights - Browse - Big Ideas - ABC TV

    My take on the value proposition, is that yes it *may* be possible to have browns cheaper than the ~ $30/kg Barry et. al. calculated; but for the freshness & quality we home-roasters achieve even $30/kg represents good value.
    Last edited by RobertHolmes; 5th December 2013 at 03:21 PM. Reason: grammar

  40. #140
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    I have to agree with MrJack! I am also into all grain home brewing and see a lot of similarities between the two processes.

    I enjoy having as much involvement in the process as possible. I am also a massive tinkerer and like to know 'how things work', so discovering the difference between end results in the cup from the Malawi Mzuzu Union when pulled a few minutes after first crack (wasn't overly fussed with results) to the second roast where I pulled right at the start of second crack (amazing rich chocolatey flavours which I can't get enough of) was fairly eye opening! It also makes for good bragging rights when you make someone a coffee which they are impressed with and you can snobbily reply "Well I roasted it myself"...

    maybe that's why I don't have any friends?

  41. #141
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by forrest View Post



    maybe that's why I don't have any friends?
    Or maybe just not the right kind of friends … yet!

    Welcome forrest - you'll find many like-minded folk here.
    Your home roasting experiences sound very like my own - when you fine nail that roast - there's no going back!
    Cheers Matt

  42. #142
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    Agreed... I have also managed to win the wife over with a home roast of the decaf wow beans which she is now in love with, so I can also say home roasting leads to stronger marriages!

  43. #143
    ivo
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    Hmmmmmmmm all of this talk of roasting has made me want to give it a shot!

  44. #144
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    I just started roasting with a small selection of beans from Bean Bay.
    Setup is a $20 breadmaker, modified with a stainless steel lid with chimney, chaff collector and port for HG, $99 Bosch heat gun (bought it to upgrade from a $15 XU1 heat gun), and a digital multimeter for temperature monitoring. I have not really tried to be that consistent with the roast, at present, just going by colour.
    Outlay has really been minimal, considering the HG is something I would use for other things.
    Whilst I am not that sophisticated in the description of how a coffee tastes, I know when I like it, and when I do not.
    The coffee (plunger or milk based) has been as good if not better than coffees that have been bought. And that includes roasted beans.
    It has worked out a lot cheaper because of the cheap setup. A Behmor or like would pay for itself in approximately 10 months by my calculations.
    For me, aside from a little time investment each week, it has been worth it.
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  45. #145
    kbc
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    I agree. You can't beat a good coretto. Cheap and gives perfect results if well
    Used. Enjoy

  46. #146
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    Iíve never been tried to roast at home. Maybe Iíll try it later ^_^Ö I think it was a good idea to roast at home and do it by yourself alone. Thank you for the wonderful idea.

  47. #147
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    I watched a friend, Ken, complete his second roast in a K Mart popper in his shed. There were too many beans in for the popper and a stir was required. After 10-12 minutes there was a lot of smoke and some coloured beans. We tried them the next day and, surprise surprise, the result wasn't too bad. The popper was a little melted around the edges though.

    So I returned home and visited my local Tip Shop and found 2 poppers. A Homemaker ($6) and a Sunbeam ($4). Sue was not happy at this time - more junk cluttering up the shed. I read through the Home Roasting Forum and decided the Sunbeam would be best used in winter (I am in Tassie) so put 80 grams of Chiang Mai beans into the Homemaker and switched on. A very quick roast on a warm day - 2 mins to first crack and straight into second. After some more reading I added holes to the popper, jiggled the device and now got first crack at around 3.5 mins and start second at 5+ mins. Autumn mornings began last week and by roasting early in the morning, outdoors, everything is slower and time to second crack yesterday was extended to 10 mins.

    Overall Results - more crema than ever seen before in our house and some delightful coffee. Sue now not concerned about the extra equipment. Interestingly each 80 gram lot requires some adjustment on the grinder - a shimmed Sunbeam 0480. (Waiting for Ross to advise my Rosco grinder is ready).

    Why did I start roasting and why have I now worked my way through my first 2.5 kilos from BeanBay and just ordered more this morning? Because it can be done, because it is interesting to try and to work out how to get more control over the popper and because the results are so good. NB: I started with Chiang Mai because we had been drinking it as roasted by Ritual Coffee in Launceston and we could compare my results with a professional's.

    I am now collecting the bits for a coretto.
    Dimal and deegee like this.

  48. #148
    Senior Member ozscott's Avatar
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    I have been roasting for a while but every year or so I spend a month purchasing different roasted beans from small roasting houses (call them boutique, artisan, etc if you like). Mostly single origin. It's a test or a marker against my own roasting - mostly single origin. I have just come off a month of other people's roasts and now have my own Ethiopian bagged up and after a couple of days rest I have true nectar again. I would not stop if I thought my product was being regularly beaten by small commercial guys, but knowing that I rarely taste better is certainly incentive enough.

    It's also very therapeutic!!

    Prost!
    Dimal likes this.

  49. #149
    Junior Member
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    I started with a small popcorn roaster with 50g max then went to a coretto. I now have the Behmor and can't get enough of the ability to customise my coffee even with the same bean. I like a lot of people enjoy sitting out the back with a coffee, listening to a roast and doing a little reading.
    Dimal likes this.

  50. #150
    Senior Member askthecoffeeguy's Avatar
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    Oct 2006
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    Preston, victoria, 3072
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    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Ive been home roasting for about 10 years now - and have owned a variety of machines including a KKTO, Gene Cafe, corretto, popcorn popper, and now a Behmor Plus!

    I like having control over the parameters of the coffee roast, to develop a profile that I like and that Im happy to drink, I also like always having a supply of freshly roasted coffee on board that I can drink whenever I like! And I find its the best way for me to develop and to grow my palate, and to improve my coffee knowledge by sampling coffees from around the world!
    sprezzatura likes this.

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