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Thread: Whats in my coffee roaster this week

  1. #1751
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    YYYYYUSS!!! First roast with the Heatsnob! Okay so after a slight blip with the first two roasts (the the actual wires were plugged into the opposite plugs, and therefore the temperatures were going in reverse, down to 0 degrees then spiking up to (minus) 2000 degrees Celsius haha, lucky I figured that out, I was stumped XD. So I only properly recorded the third roast I did. It's a Colombian Red Bourbon Honey- Las Margaritas La Esperanza, a honey processed coffee. Have never roasted honey processed before, just did it on standard 1lb P2A on the Behmor and stopped it at different depths post-FC.

    Looking at my profile, I'm pretty sure that's not really supposed to happen is it haha? The roast clearly stalling there and then DROPPING in temperature... I've never had access to seeing how the temps are during the roast (and this is just air temp, the probe was placed in through the side of the door, and hanging at the side of the inside of the Behmor, near the left wall). So maybe my cracking the door open upon Rolling FC was usually a mistake could I conclude? Seems to get temp going in other direction.

    I'm a total noob to looking at temps and the general profile etc, all my experience was with sights and sounds prior to this, so it looks like I've got a lot to learn XD

    Attached Images Attached Images
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  2. #1752
    Senior Member artman's Avatar
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    Looks like a yummy roast! You can easily use a bead probe through the spindle to measure bean temp, probably more meaningful.

    I did a couple of roasted on the weekend. Panama Geisha - Don Pepe Washedand Costa Rica San Marcos Geisha. They are resting as we speak. First ever "fancy" bean roast. Can't wait to try these!!!

    Cheers
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  3. #1753
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by artman View Post
    Looks like a yummy roast! You can easily use a bead probe through the spindle to measure bean temp, probably more meaningful.

    I did a couple of roasted on the weekend. Panama Geisha - Don Pepe Washedand Costa Rica San Marcos Geisha. They are resting as we speak. First ever "fancy" bean roast. Can't wait to try these!!!

    Cheers
    Ah ok cheers for that . With the bead probe in Beanbay it says isn't the best for measuring bean temp (seems to suggest it's moreso due to wear and tear issue), have you used that one or a different one?

  4. #1754
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    Yeah, my 2cents the air temp is not really indicative of what's happening in the beans as they'll carry the heat even if you reduce the power of the roaster. I've got a heatsnob for BT, and a regular analogue thermometer for drum air temp, the air temp will vary quite a bit more than the bean temp with changes to power input.
    You'd probably find they didn't stall if you'd been monitoring the BT.. Roast looks good.

    I had my best result at following a profile last night, finishing off the competition beans the BT temps matched almost exactly the entire roast. Running out of the Yigacheffe special prep, will order another bag what a great bean.
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  5. #1755
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Yeah, my 2cents the air temp is not really indicative of what's happening in the beans as they'll carry the heat even if you reduce the power of the roaster. I've got a heatsnob for BT, and a regular analogue thermometer for drum air temp, the air temp will vary quite a bit more than the bean temp with changes to power input.
    You'd probably find they didn't stall if you'd been monitoring the BT.. Roast looks good.

    I had my best result at following a profile last night, finishing off the competition beans the BT temps matched almost exactly the entire roast. Running out of the Yigacheffe special prep, will order another bag what a great bean.
    Ah yeah I have heard that it's not true bean temp, but also heard that consistency is really what's most important. But going by that last roast I did, it'd maybe be a bit tricky to get that consistency, as the temp rose, then kept falling through that last portion, so did I get my roast (in air temp that is) to end at 124? Because it actually reached 124 a few times during the roast haha, so I can't really replicate that by just stopping when I reach 124 next time. Unless I follow that same pattern and wait it out.

    Me thinks I'll get the Behmor plus panel upgrade and take that next step, so I can get that consistency and control over the roast, and maybe a bead probe through the spindle possibly.. Thanks Janis appreciate it

  6. #1756
    Senior Member woodhouse's Avatar
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    Whats in my coffee roaster this week

    so roasted the biftu gesha for the first time yesterday. half-decent curve, albeit jagged as hell. just had a french press of it, and it surprised me with how much fruit punched through. looking forward to drinking this one, which is more than I can say for a lot of my roasts!

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  7. #1757
    Senior Member artman's Avatar
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    Yes I use the beanbay bead probe. Yes probably not ideal but after many roasts it's still going great. Even after a small internal fire which melted the insulation a little. They are cheap anyway so if they do die after a while it's no biggie.

    Super responsive too.

    I use mine with the old multi meter, not sure if heatsnob would be any different but wouldn't expect so as they are a standard thermocouple if I'm not mistaken.

    Do a search for wiper mod or similar, I posted the info a while ago.

    Cheers
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  8. #1758
    Senior Member woodhouse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by artman View Post
    Yes I use the beanbay bead probe. Yes probably not ideal but after many roasts it's still going great. Even after a small internal fire which melted the insulation a little. They are cheap anyway so if they do die after a while it's no biggie.

    Super responsive too.

    I use mine with the old multi meter, not sure if heatsnob would be any different but wouldn't expect so as they are a standard thermocouple if I'm not mistaken.

    Do a search for wiper mod or similar, I posted the info a while ago.

    Cheers
    it was your post that inspired me to do the same! the previous owner drilled the drum spindle, so it was easy for me to rig up something super-similar to yours. thanks for sharing! it's made the world of difference in my roasting!

    probably gonna play around with pre-heating for a couple of minutes next. i know it may turn out inconsistent because it's fiddly inserting the drum, let alone into a hot oven, but i really want to get a steeper ROR earlier so i can taper off more gradually without ending with a bake.
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  9. #1759
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by artman View Post
    Yes I use the beanbay bead probe. Yes probably not ideal but after many roasts it's still going great. Even after a small internal fire which melted the insulation a little. They are cheap anyway so if they do die after a while it's no biggie.

    Super responsive too.

    I use mine with the old multi meter, not sure if heatsnob would be any different but wouldn't expect so as they are a standard thermocouple if I'm not mistaken.

    Do a search for wiper mod or similar, I posted the info a while ago.

    Cheers

    Awesome, I just had a proper read of it, looks super simple to do... I think I may just do that .

    So my shopping list:

    -Windscreen wiper refill blade (possibly 6mm width one? Guess it won't matter too much. Autobarn is just down the road)

    -Copper wire (this is to wrap the probe wire to the metal wiper blade I believe)

    -Behmor upgrade panel

    -2x bead probes (one spare)

    -Bunch of easy to roast green beans to practice using the Heatsnob


    And of course drill through the spindle (dad can help with that).


    Thanks so much artman appreciate your help, will let y'all know how it goes. Possibly in another thread, I've sort of taken it semi-off topic now!

    To bring it back on topic... the roasted Colombian beans smell amazing haha.

  10. #1760
    Senior Member artman's Avatar
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    I guess it's still a bit on topic. What's in my roaster? A bead probe on a wiper blade!!!

    Panama rati black honey in my roaster today.

    Cheers
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  11. #1761
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by artman View Post
    I guess it's still a bit on topic. What's in my roaster? A bead probe on a wiper blade!!!

    Panama rati black honey in my roaster today.

    Cheers
    Haha that IS true XD

    Pulled another few roasts today, just had to use my Heatsnob!

    Roasted up 300g of Ethiopia Sidamo Ardi Naturals, and a Brazil Sitio Baixadao Natural, both for filter, mainly as a gift to the grandparents, but saved 60g of each for myself to trial . Stopped 20s into Rolling FC.

    Semi-possibly stuffed up the Brazil a little, somehow the drum came out of its hinge and I had to stop and refit, along with trying to get the Behmor to start again (it did it's "too hot, try later" game), luckily only about a minute into the roast. Not sure of the affect there!

    Ethiopia
    --->
    Brazil20180125_193647.jpg

  12. #1762
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Just roasted the last of my Sumatran Kokowagayo FTO. This was a surprisingly nice coffee for a wet hulled Sumatran. Way better than any of the other Indonesian coffees Iíve tried so far and Iíll definitely be getting it again. Roast went well and itís come up looking good so should be nice in a few days time.

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  13. #1763
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Hmmm...

    Have never had anything but excellent results from all of the Sumatran coffees we've had access to from CS over the years. All of them have been wet-process beans too.

    Mal.

  14. #1764
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    Hmmm...

    Have never had anything but excellent results from all of the Sumatran coffees we've had access to from CS over the years. All of them have been wet-process beans too.

    Mal.
    G'Day Mal.

    To my taste Indonesian coffees are quite unique, my feeling is you either like them or not, they all seem to have a very earthy taste that I'm not fond of.

    My preference is for African or South American beans.
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  15. #1765
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    I guess after telling you what I dislike I'd best disclose what I am roasting, 4 days ago I roasted 650 grams of Ethiopian Limmu with 100 grams of Indian Magundi Robusta, as usual took it just to the first snaps of second crack, very Italian, already drinking nicely, it's a crema monster.
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  16. #1766
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    I love all bean varieties from CS to be honest but if I had to pick a favourite, then that would be Yemen Ismaili...

    Mal.
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  17. #1767
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    I love all bean varieties from CS to be honest but if I had to pick a favourite, then that would be Yemen Ismaili...

    Mal.
    (Ahhh I never got a chance to try the Yemen.. everyone's telling me I'm missing out haha.. still not available at the moment, but I'll be the first to buy if it is!)

  18. #1768
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    I donít think thereís much coffee getting out of Yemen at all at the moment unfortunately due to the war. It sounds like a real mission to get shipments out.

  19. #1769
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    I donít think thereís much coffee getting out of Yemen at all at the moment unfortunately due to the war. It sounds like a real mission to get shipments out.
    Yeah true hey, heard about that, yikes..
    Although I've heard the Ethiopian Gambella Sundried is similar in ways to the Ismali so I may give that a go

  20. #1770
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    Hmmm...

    Have never had anything but excellent results from all of the Sumatran coffees we've had access to from CS over the years. All of them have been wet-process beans too.

    Mal.
    To be fair at least part of the problem could be the roaster. Or should I say roasters - both me and the Behmor. Iíve found most coffees from Latin America and Africa reasonably easy to roast. I havenít always got it right, but havenít struggled as much as I have with coffee from Indonesia. Generally the African and Latin American coffees I buy look like quality coffee - theyíre more even sized beans and a more even appearance. All the Indonesian coffee Iíve bought has been ugly by comparison - a wider range of sizes and appearance of the beans as well as more broken pieces and even a couple of little stones. And of course the strange hue that the wet hulling gives them. All of this has made them more challenging to roast.
    I trust my supplier, Iím sure they see something in all the coffees they sell and wouldnít offer them otherwise. Recently Iíve been reminded of the fact that I know very little and these people are the experts and to a certain extent I should trust their judgment. The first was when I finally worked out how to roast and brew the Timorese FTO I buy from them. Iíve had it before a few times before and have usually just roasted it for espresso blends. But I took a slightly different approach with the last couple of batches with surprisingly pleasing results. Itís still good in espresso, either in a blend or on its own. But Iíve made some absolutely beautiful Aeropresses with it when brewing at a ratio of 1:8 then adding a bit more water afterwards. The other was some Liberica from the Philippines that I bought to try. By far the ugliest coffee Iíve ever seen and the first batch was pretty awful. It was so bad that I threw most of it in the superauto machine at work. So I sought of wrote it off and did another batch at close to max batch size of 400g. Wow! What a difference! The roast went much better and itís making beautiful espresso, both blended 50/50 with the Timor and this morning as a SO. Itís only gone in cappuccinos so far, but Iíll try an espresso and a soft brew of it this week some time.
    So Iím always learning and always prepared to change my opinion and I fully realise how little I really know. So maybe Iíll find another Indonesian coffee I like other than the Kokowagayo. My supplier offers 5 or 6 Sumatrans and a Sulawesi so thereís plenty to try.
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  21. #1771
    Senior Member artman's Avatar
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    Just had an espresso of Panama Geisha - Don Pepe Washed a week post roast.

    Wow. Absolutely. Delicious!!!

    So so smooth.

    Amazing.

    Damn you yummy CoffeeSnobs beans!!

    Cheers

  22. #1772
    Senior Member artman's Avatar
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    The Don Pepe washed left a delicious lingering after taste in my mouth for hours. I am not great at describing flavours, but it was a perfectly balanced taste of spices/fruits I guess would be a great description, with nothing overpowering. Its going to be hard going back to "normal" coffee!!

    I also had an espresso of the Panama rati black honey, only 3 days post roast but it tasted great. Sort of like a toned down don pepe. Also delicious.

    Cheers
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  23. #1773
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    G'Day Mal.

    To my taste Indonesian coffees are quite unique, my feeling is you either like them or not, they all seem to have a very earthy taste that I'm not fond of.

    My preference is for African or South American beans.
    Hi Yelta
    I was surprised recently with Indo's. The Sulawesi taken to second crack always gives that lovely, smooth earthy flavour, great as a base in Mocha Java with a nice fruity Ethiopian. But if you roast them lighter by 3-4į, you can get some amazing fruity, almost central-like coffee flavours
    But only if you roast lighter

    Here's my latest - PNG Waghi… mmmmmm caramel explosion

    20180126-PNGwaghi25amb800g.jpg
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  24. #1774
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesigningByCoffee View Post
    Hi Yelta
    I was surprised recently with Indo's. The Sulawesi taken to second crack always gives that lovely, smooth earthy flavour, great as a base in Mocha Java with a nice fruity Ethiopian. But if you roast them lighter by 3-4į, you can get some amazing fruity, almost central-like coffee flavours
    But only if you roast lighter

    Here's my latest - PNG WaghiÖ mmmmmm caramel explosion
    Morning DBC,

    My preference is for darker roasts with rich chocolaty flavours, dislike earthy taste and really dislike light roasts.

    I know I sound like a fussy bugger, however have been drinking and enjoying coffee for more years than I care to admit and my likes and dislikes are pretty much cast in stone, I've tried most coffee options during my life and, this is me! what more can I say.
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  25. #1775
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Morning DBC,

    My preference is for darker roasts with rich chocolaty flavours, dislike earthy taste and really dislike light roasts.

    I know I sound like a fussy bugger, however have been drinking and enjoying coffee for more years than I care to admit and my likes and dislikes are pretty much cast in stone, I've tried most coffee options during my life and, this is me! what more can I say.
    Fair enuff
    Hence my tongue in cheek comment … "but only if you roast lighter." Been around long enough to know your preferences around that matter!

    What I found interesting in developing a mocha java type blend was that it was the earthy-ness of the Indo that added that 'cocoa' type mouthfeel to the blend, but on it's own was a little flavourless. Most of the flavour came from the Ethiopian (Harrar, Sidamo etc), but they were quite thin, with little body and grunt. But you magically combine them – presto, big chocolate! (as a flat white anyway). That's the advantage of roasting components separately - you get to learn what each bit does.
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  26. #1776
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DesigningByCoffee View Post
    But if you roast them lighter by 3-4į, you can get some amazing fruity, almost central-like coffee flavours
    But only if you roast lighter
    Found this to be particularly true of the Aceh Danau Laut Tawar that Andy has available currently. Doesn't really need anything else blended with it at all...

    Mal.
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  27. #1777
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    The only blending I do is the occasional addition of a percentage of Robusta, or when I get a few bags of tail ends and roast em all together, apart from that I'm 100% single origin.

    Similar philosophy with wine as well, much prefer varietals to blends, not suggesting it's the right or only way, and not try to evangelise, but it is my way.
    Last edited by Yelta; 2 Weeks Ago at 05:58 PM.
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  28. #1778
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    The only blending I do is the addition of a percentage of Robusta, or when I get a few bags of tail ends and roast em all together, apart from that I'm 100% single origin.

    Similar philosophy with wine as well, much prefer varietals to blends, not suggesting it's the right or only way, and not try to evangelise, but it is my way.
    Iím struggling with this maths Yelta. I had a laugh. If you drink 100% single origin where does the Robusta get blended in? Have you found a way to get a blend thatís over 100% the sum of its parts?

  29. #1779
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    Iím struggling with this maths Yelta. I had a laugh. If you drink 100% single origin where does the Robusta get blended in? Have you found a way to get a blend thatís over 100% the sum of its parts?
    Have amended my post Leroy, added the word occasional.

    The qualifier in my post was the words "apart from that I'm 100% single origin."

    Not sure why I'm defending this, I'm pretty sure you understood what I was getting at.

  30. #1780
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Have amended my post Leroy, added the word occasional.

    The qualifier in my post was the words "apart from that I'm 100% single origin."

    Not sure why I'm defending this, I'm pretty sure you understood what I was getting at.
    ;-P






    Of course.

  31. #1781
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    The only blending I do is the occasional addition of a percentage of Robusta, or when I get a few bags of tail ends and roast em all together, apart from that I'm 100% single origin.

    Similar philosophy with wine as well, much prefer varietals to blends, not suggesting it's the right or only way, and not try to evangelise, but it is my way.
    Yeah I'm a bit the same Yelta, primarily single origin roasting/drinking

  32. #1782
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Got lots of requests this week, so a few roasts to do.
    Two yesterday - Panama Honey (sweet, smooth brew this morning!) and some Sidamo Guji. Both 800g, roasted quite quickly, slowed after first crack and dropped earlier at 216į for the Guji and 218į for the Panama - around 5-7į sooner than my baseline profile.
    I'm getting lovely results from the faster roast / lighter drop. I would have thought it would increase sourness/acidity too much, but with these beans it doesn't seem to. I wonder if the greater temperature input actually gives more energy for 'cooking' the beans right through sooner…

    20180129-PanamaBlackHoney800g30amb.jpg 20180129-SidamoGuji800g30amb.jpg
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  33. #1783
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    I had an espresso of the Sumatran Kokowagayo this afternoon and man was it good. It was beautifully balanced with some very pronounced sweetness, good body and moderate acidity. To be fair there was a touch of earthiness, but it was more in the aftertaste and wasnít at all unpleasant.
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  34. #1784
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Two more - the latest China Dai Muang offering (was fairly plain as a 'standard' roast, but this time I went a little slower and darker like a would a brasil) and I'm getting lovely results with much chocolate .
    Also more Waghi, roasted faster and a little lighter, which gives lovely smooth caramel…

    20180131-ChinaDaiMuang800g30amb.jpg 20180131-PNGWaghi800g30amb.jpg
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  35. #1785
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    Been a while since i posted a roast. Scored a semi busted espresso machine i've managed to get working with pre infusion and PID temp, have realised i'm roasting too light for espresso, drinks are a bit too mild not cutting through the milk. Decided to roast to 12-14c past FC and see how it goes.

    Sulawesi blue roasted to 213c 15.2% moisture loss (FC i didn't hear so i'm a bit unsure what happened with this one):
    20180203-142gSulawesi.jpg
    IMG_3297.jpg

    Rati Hartmann roasted to 208c 15.17% moisture loss (14c past FC):
    20180203-140gRatiHartmann.jpg
    IMG_3298.jpg

    Colombian Vulcan Galeras Special, moisture loss 15.4% (roasted to 12c past FC), still looks very light in colour might have roasted too slow??
    20180203-140gColombianVulcan.jpg

    only 5 pictures allowed, photo of Colombian in next post.

    The PID espresso machine has been very interesting to use, I reckon more flavour from the brews but the lighter roasts seem weaker in milk, i'm not sure if the stock (pre millenium) Gaggia classic i've been using runs hotter water, and that makes the espresso stronger?? (with maybe less flavour), but my wife and i both agree a darker roast would be better on this new machine.

  36. #1786
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    IMG_3296.jpg

    light colouring for a roast well past FC for the Colombians. The light in the shots makes them look lighter than they are I think, the Rati Hartmann and Sulawesi are a bit darker, still not what i'd call a dark roast though.
    How far past FC do people take their espresso/latte roasts?

  37. #1787
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Generally take mine to 220-223C for espresso drinks.
    With my setup, 223C is just on the cusp of 2nd-Crack for most beans...

    Mal.
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  38. #1788
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    Generally take mine to 220-223C for espresso drinks.
    With my setup, 223C is just on the cusp of 2nd-Crack for most beans...

    Mal.
    I only roast for espresso, I take all of my roasts to the first snaps of second crack, I enjoy dark roasts.

    "With my setup, 223C is just on the cusp of 2nd-Crack for most beans...

    "Interesting Mal, I hear the first snaps of SC @ almost spot on 225įC.
    Last edited by Yelta; 2 Weeks Ago at 11:49 AM.
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  39. #1789
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    How far past FC do people take their espresso/latte roasts?
    I dont know temp-wise (yet... gonna mod it to get bean temp soon!), but usually varying between 30s-1m30s past the end of FC. Usually 1m suits nice

  40. #1790
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    Timing depends on ROR, figured degrees past FC would give me a good ballpark for where people are cooling. It get first crack anywhere between 192-198.

  41. #1791
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    It get first crack anywhere between 192-198.
    It depends very much on the calibration/location of your temp monitoring device.

    I see FC @ almost spot on 200įC every roast.
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  42. #1792
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    Whats in my coffee roaster this week

    Thanks Yelta, so youíll cool around 23c over FC temp if dumping at first sign of second crack.
    Might roast another batch of the Colombian tonight and cool around 215-218c, see how they go. Good fun

  43. #1793
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    Thanks Yelta, so youíll cool around 23c over FC temp if dumping at first sign of second crack.
    Might roast another batch of the Colombian tonight and cool around 215-218c, see how they go. Good fun
    No, I wait for the first snaps of SC or the DMM to register 225įC whichever comes first, then cool immediately.
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  44. #1794
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    so i finally got a clean graph out of my setup. dunno if it's because everything's now in the right place, or because i gave the behmor a good simple-greening last night...but anyway, nice-looking curve out of the biftu gesha. preheated for 2 min at P5, and this seems to have brought 1st crack forward about 60-75 seconds.. dropped at 10:24 at 17% DTR around 218c; probably took it a little hot for filter, but i think it should be nice regardless. super-happy about the shorter roast time - the current average is 13min!

    #38 Biftu Gesha.jpg
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  45. #1795
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Interesting Mal, I hear the first snaps of SC @ almost spot on 225įC.
    I'd say that mine very closely replicates the characteristics of your setup mate...
    1st-Crack is always within a degree of 200C and if I extend my profile a little further, 2nd-Crack usually starts between 224-225C. At 223C, the 'blue smoke' starts up quite quickly and often as I pour the beans into the cooler, I can hear a couple of lazy 2nd-Cracks going off.... No more than 3-6 or so.

    Mal.
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  46. #1796
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    Ethiopia Biftu Gesha SunDried with Indo. Aceh Danau Laut Tawar

    Our eldest son (Ken) gave me a bag of Biftu Gesha for Christmas and this is the first chance I've had to roast some...
    Love this bean.

    Used what has become my standard profile of late, with slight adjustments just before and after 1st-Crack.
    Dumped the batch into the cooler at ~221C, which were cooled to ambient temperature in less than a minute.
    As always, lovely aromas emanating from the cooler.

    Blend details below, with roast profile and post-roast photos attached.

    Mal.

    Details...
    Ethiopia Biftu Gesha SunDried... 400g
    Indo. Aceh Danau Laut Tawar... 350g
    Roasted Weight... 638g
    Moisture Loss... 14.93%
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  47. #1797
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    First cup of the roast from Saturday night, trying the Colombian. Definitely cutting through the milk a lot better than the previous lighter roasts. Look forward to seeing how it develops. Pretty keen to try the Rati Hartmann, will leave it a few more days though. Might try roasting another batch of Colombian tonight if i have time and take it right up to near second crack, then i can compare the 2 after a week or so.
    Espresso at 93c has a lot more flavour.

    ah 1 question unrelated to what's in my roaster. I understand the basic idea for espresso is 25-30 seconds for 25-30ml coffee, however what about for a double, do you just run it 60 seconds for 60-70 ml? The largest basket i have takes about 17g of coffee, i'm finding the stream gets weak and fast towards the end so that i don't really want to run the coffee much past 35 seconds. Or would a larger basket, say 22g give me a longer extraction time that retains quality?

  48. #1798
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    The PID espresso machine has been very interesting to use, I reckon more flavour from the brews but the lighter roasts seem weaker in milk, i'm not sure if the stock (pre millenium) Gaggia classic i've been using runs hotter water, and that makes the espresso stronger?? (with maybe less flavour), but my wife and i both agree a darker roast would be better on this new machine.
    You certainly will see some difference with a different machine - is it an E61 style machine?
    Hotter water can 'cook' the coffee more (for want of a better description) and change the extraction characteristics (not only the amount but what compounds actually come out) so it will change flavour. You may find that you can get away with grinding finer on the new machine? I find that slightly lighter roasts can get a bit thin with a 'traditional' 30sec pour, but tighten it up and slow it down, and a lot of the flavour can come to the party (sweetness, body, fruitiness). You can certainly roast darker - but don't be afraid to play with grind
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  49. #1799
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janus View Post
    ah 1 question unrelated to what's in my roaster. I understand the basic idea for espresso is 25-30 seconds for 25-30ml coffee, however what about for a double, do you just run it 60 seconds for 60-70 ml? The largest basket i have takes about 17g of coffee, i'm finding the stream gets weak and fast towards the end so that i don't really want to run the coffee much past 35 seconds. Or would a larger basket, say 22g give me a longer extraction time that retains quality?
    Nah I wouldn't say run it for 60 seconds, so that recommendation definitely doesn't seem to get explained where I see it written, so it means if you're using a double basket, it's 25-30ml per SPOUT. So 50-60ml TOTAL (only using capital letters because I can't using italics in Tapatalk :P). But I would steer from using mls/volume and much prefer using weight, as it's more dose specific and makes alot more sense. Extracting a total of 50-60ml for a 16-17g dose compared to a 23g dose will have very different results! Much easier to use brew ratios, as it's based on what you're actually dosing rather than an arbitrary volume measure, so generally a 1:2 (dry:liquid) brew ratio is common (so if dosing 17g, to aim for 34g weight of espresso). Then you can tweak it from there depending on particular bean, roast depth, and more importantly taste!

    Most people stick with using a double/triple basket (not all), as using a single basket seems a bit trickier. But many have had success with singles.

    A larger basket (and hence larger dose) won't necessarily give a longer extraction time, but moreso it will give you a bigger total yield (output weight of espresso. If sticking 1:2 ratio, a 22g dose will give 44g). A larger beverage essentially. So it'll be 'stronger' in a milk based drink, as there's more espresso to milk ratio. If you just run a 17g shot for longer, there's only so much stuff you can extract from the grounds, and then you'll be extracting stuff you don't necessarily want into the cup!

    I think it's getting weak and fast towards the end is because you may be sticking to that 25-30ml (or 50-60ml total) volume rule, which for 17g of coffee may not be optimal, hence why weight is a much better way to evaluate. So I'd suggest aiming for about 34g TOTAL weight of espresso and I reckon things will improve

  50. #1800
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    Whats in my coffee roaster this week

    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Itís a Breville dual boiler.

    Thanks for the advice.

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