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Thread: Flavouring.

  1. #1
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    Flavouring.

    Cafelat Coffee Tamper and Accessories
    Hello my friends from the opposite side of the world...

    I was wondering about roasting flavoured coffees and if anybody has any experience in it and/or tips on how the heck to do it. I used the search engine for the forums, even spelling it the wrong way (no u), and couldn't find anything... Well, there was one but the link was dead.

    I am typically a strictly black coffee with as little sugar as possible, but I think for Christmas, I think I want to try roasting a Cinnnamon, a peppermint, and maybe just a classic Hazelnut... for fun.

    SO... Any ideas?

    I own a Behmor 1600 drum roaster, so I do roast it myself from green.

    Thanks,

    Your friendly Neighbourhood Coffee Snob... ummm on the other side of the world... Canada!

  2. #2
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    There is a chapter on that sort of thing towards the end of Kenneth David's book "Home Coffee Roasting: Romance and Revival". Too much to re-iterate here sorry.

    Pete

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Javaphile's Avatar
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    You don't roast flavored coffee. You roast coffee and then flavor it with a coating. If you really must cover up the taste of good coffee with flavorings there's a nice selection of flavored syrups out there. Using those will allow you to have drink the coffee straight or flavor it. If you insist on flavoring the beans themselves both liquid and solid types of flavorings are available.


    Java "Don't let any of the flavorings get anywhere near your roaster!" phile
    Toys! I must have new toys!!!

  4. #4
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    In some parts of the world 'torrefacto' roasting is pretty common, which involves adding sugar directly into the roaster to coat the beans. These are then blended with a regular roast afterwards.

    Torrefacto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Torrefacto Roasted Coffee jimseven

  5. #5
    Senior Member WiredArabica's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Javaphile View Post
    Java "Don't let any of the flavorings get anywhere near your roaster!" phile
    Not to mention the poor grinder!

  6. #6
    Senior Member Vinitasse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Javaphile View Post
    You don't roast flavored coffee. You roast coffee and then flavor it with a coating. If you really must cover up the taste of good coffee with flavorings there's a nice selection of flavored syrups out there. Using those will allow you to have drink the coffee straight or flavor it. If you insist on flavoring the beans themselves both liquid and solid types of flavorings are available.


    Java "Don't let any of the flavorings get anywhere near your roaster!" phile
    I assume you've never tried Vietnamese butter roasted coffee then? Clarified butter, oil, sugar and sometimes vanilla are thrown in the roaster with the beans for a long, slow roast. What could possibly be more fun than cleaning rancid burnt butter out of a roaster in a hot, humid country like Vietnam?

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    Hi I don't like to be the bitter dude that just reads random posts looking to dis instead of being constructive which is obviously what your after but I can't help myself; would you be interested in buying a nicely aged Shiraz if it had the addition of flavoring? Say 'added orange juice' or 'pineapple' or if your 10yo port wine isn't sweet enough just add a teaspoon of sugar! My constructive advice would be put your roaster to good use with some premium single origins if you want some interesting nuances from your coffee - provided you know how to brew it well too of course

  8. #8
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    I think for Christmas, I think I want to try roasting a Cinnnamon, a peppermint, and maybe just a classic Hazelnut... for fun.
    I prefer unflavoured coffee but if you have to, then syrups are the best way to add flavours to coffee as they can be adjusted per cup as you add them later giving you the choice of flavoured or non-flavoured.

    Coffee beans are hydroscopic and will take on liquid and smells of items around them. Why don't you experiment with dropping some whole cinnamon sticks in the bag of coffee after roasting to see if much of the flavour migrates to the beans. Peppermint leaves and roasted hazelnuts might work too. The flavours would be more subtle but would be more natural.

    I've been going to experiment with the above for years but I'm enjoying good coffee too much to want to flavour it.

    Let us know how you go.
    Icecursor likes this.

  9. #9
    Senior Member WiredArabica's Avatar
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    I recall watching a video of a WBC competition on youtube a while back, in which one of the contestants signature drink for the event was a shot pulled through some spices placed on a muslin cloth suspended above the demitasse.
    I forget the exact mixture but iirc it contained star anise and a couple of other things. I've been meaning to try something like this myself - I like espresso, I like anise, only makes sense to try the two together!
    Must try and find that clip again.
    Icecursor likes this.

  10. #10
    Senior Member trentski's Avatar
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    Good thread on Hazelnut coffee here
    Hazelnut coffee

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wynton87 View Post
    Hi I don't like to be the bitter dude that just reads random posts looking to dis instead of being constructive which is obviously what your after but I can't help myself; would you be interested in buying a nicely aged Shiraz if it had the addition of flavoring? Say 'added orange juice' or 'pineapple' or if your 10yo port wine isn't sweet enough just add a teaspoon of sugar! My constructive advice would be put your roaster to good use with some premium single origins if you want some interesting nuances from your coffee - provided you know how to brew it well too of course
    Hi Wynton87,
    I just had to respond to your post, because 1 I enjoy confrontation, but more importantly, I LOVE correcting foolishness. Firstly, a nicely aged Shiraz is an already altered drink... hence AGED. You can buy a 1 year old Shiraz at any liquor store. This is very similar to coffee because the pallet has many nuances of oak, floral, and in certain years you can actually get the hint of fruitiness... of course that is solely dependent on the vineyard they come from, the additives, the pollination process... etc, I'm sure you know that too, so I'll let that be.

    Being Portuguese myself, I'm sure I've had some of the best tasting Port Wine in the world since I've been to the vineyards, to the cellars big and small around Porto, Portugal and along the back-road vineyards that run along the Douro River. You are right that the port wine is very good. But why is that? The full flavour of a wine and the sweetness of juice? Since you're an apparent wine purist I'm sure you don't like the sweetness at all, because that wouldn't really be similar to a wine since the fermentation process is stopped before the sugar transformers into alcohol. Which again, I assume you know.

    But here's the part that bugs me about armchair quarterbacks like yourself... And I quote from MY post which YOU are responding to:

    "I am typically a strictly black coffee with as little sugar as possible, but I think for Christmas, I think I want to try roasting a Cinnamon, a peppermint, and maybe just a classic Hazelnut... for fun."

    I am trying to experiment with flavours. I enjoy my roasts. I love my single origin already, and I want to experiment. I have tried Many single origin coffees since that's how I began my roasting journey 2 years ago. I've experimented with continental blends (beans from around, for example, Africa or South America). I have also experimented with cross continental blends and I enjoy my coffee thoroughly. I have experimented with different brewing methods... currently I enjoy very much enjoying my french press and a good espresso.

    I can only assume you didn't want to read the post due to it's enormous size, or simply get bored reading other people's opinions so you assume what they say and pay no attention to what they actually do say. However, maybe next time you can either answer the question proposed or if you have nothing to add to the conversation, go to another post. Clearly you couldn't help yourself... but maybe you should have. Had I wanted an opinion on whether I should flavour or not I wouldn't be a member of a website called COFFEE SNOBS. I realize straight coffee is just fantastic, but like I have stated before in this response, I would like to experiment with flavouring my roasts.

    Now, do you have any tips, or just more non-topical banter?
    Dragunov21 likes this.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by WiredArabica View Post
    I recall watching a video of a WBC competition on youtube a while back, in which one of the contestants signature drink for the event was a shot pulled through some spices placed on a muslin cloth suspended above the demitasse.
    I forget the exact mixture but iirc it contained star anise and a couple of other things. I've been meaning to try something like this myself - I like espresso, I like anise, only makes sense to try the two together!
    Must try and find that clip again.
    that sounds pretty interesting.

  13. #13
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    That's a good idea. I'm roasting a pound up this weekend and maybe I will split it up in quarters and try something like that.

  14. #14
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    Hey Andy,

    That's a good idea. I'm roasting a pound up this weekend and maybe I will split it up in quarters and try something like that.

  15. #15
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    I know a barista who adds spices ( ground cinamon, chilli, cocoa , etc ).. to the PF before tamping and extracting.
    I tried the chilli, and found it "interesting " !!

  16. #16
    Senior Member WiredArabica's Avatar
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    Found it: Scottie Callaghan Barista Comp. Part 1. Part 2. The whole thing is worth watching just to see the work-flow, but the pertinent bit is ~3mins into part 2. Actually not quite how I remember it, but it's what prompted the idea to try anise. And I'll probably cheat and use a small sieve lined with muslin instead of the nice wooden frame, and there's no way that I'd be adding the sugar syrup, but it does look interesting.

  17. #17
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    hey blend52

    thats almost like a mexican coffee... minus the alcohol... cinnamon, chilli, and cocoa... I may have to try that sometime

  18. #18
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    To each his own Wynton, if Icecursor wants to experiment with flavours more power to him, it would be a pretty boring world if we we're all purists.

  19. #19
    Senior Member GregWormald's Avatar
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    IMO--flavouring before roasting is not a good idea unless you know how the flavouring is going to react to 200C+.
    Flavouring after roasting can contaminate the grinder and/or leave you with coffee beans flavoured in a way you don't like.
    Best bet--flavour the coffee during or after extraction.
    I actually like some coffee drinks flavoured with liqueurs--added to the cup. In addition, I am usually guaranteed a good flavouring 'syrup'.

    Greg

  20. #20
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregWormald View Post
    IMO--flavouring before roasting is not a good idea unless you know how the flavouring is going to react to 200C+.
    Flavouring after roasting can contaminate the grinder and/or leave you with coffee beans flavoured in a way you don't like.
    Best bet--flavour the coffee during or after extraction.
    I actually like some coffee drinks flavoured with liqueurs--added to the cup. In addition, I am usually guaranteed a good flavouring 'syrup'.

    Greg
    What are your favorite liqueurs Greg?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregWormald View Post
    IMO--flavouring before roasting is not a good idea unless you know how the flavouring is going to react to 200C+.
    Flavouring after roasting can contaminate the grinder and/or leave you with coffee beans flavoured in a way you don't like.
    Best bet--flavour the coffee during or after extraction.
    I actually like some coffee drinks flavoured with liqueurs--added to the cup. In addition, I am usually guaranteed a good flavouring 'syrup'.

    Greg
    I've had the 'enjoyment' of repairing a Compak K6 grinder after someone decided to experiment by making a liqueur coffee - the problem was that they tried adding the liqueur not to the cup, but to the beans in the hopper! By the time I got my hands on the grinder, the paste that would have been created by mixing grounds and alcohol had set like concrete in the grind head, and in the threads of the upper burr carrier. It took 30 minutes of careful work (and a big hammer!) to work the burr carrier loose, and another half an hour carefully picking and scraping the gunge out of every crevice.
    Dragunov21 likes this.

  22. #22
    Senior Member GregWormald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    What are your favorite liqueurs Greg?
    The only regular favourite would be Irish Mist in iced coffee.
    The others I enjoy occasionally are Cointreau, Butterscotch, Grand Marnier, Drambuie, and Cherry Heering when the coffee is also extracted over roasted hazelnuts.

    Greg
    Icecursor likes this.

  23. #23
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    I routinely sprinkle ground cinnamon into the grounds prior to addition to the basket. On occasion I will add small pieces of cinnamon or ground cinnamon to to the beans prior to grind. I think it adds a great flavour, but you have to be careful not to overdo it. The cinnamon appears to make the crema more orange-gold in colour.
    I tried also to put coca powder into the basket with the grounds, but it tends to block the basket and results in a waste of coffee.
    Ground nutmeg is also not bad but you have to be very light with your sprinkle otherwise it becomes too strong.
    Vanilla extract is also a nice addition to the shot, but honey is not.
    I tried roasted hazelnuts but there was no good way that I could get the nuts/grinds to extract properly or taste very nice.
    I am sure that some CoffeeSnob purists will think all of this is a waste of coffee, but I think you should give it a go before you knock it!

    Any other things I could try?

  24. #24
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NooBean View Post

    Any other things I could try?
    A shot of Bushmills / Black Bush.

  25. #25
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    cardamom with espresso is nice. Just put a pod into a demitasse and pull the espresso into it.

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    As the others have said, don't contaminate your equipment, but after brewing you could try adding kirsch or schnapps to the cup.

    Quite popular in the European alps in winter.

  27. #27
    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post

    Coffee beans are hydroscopic and will take on liquid and smells of items around them. Why don't you experiment with dropping some whole cinnamon sticks in the bag of coffee after roasting to see if much of the flavour migrates to the beans.
    Do yourself a favour and don't do this with vanilla beans.

  28. #28
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragunov21 View Post
    Do yourself a favour and don't do this with vanilla beans.
    Or baked beans. Improves fibre content, but makes an awful flat white.
    Dragunov21 likes this.

  29. #29
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Quote Originally Posted by Dragunov21 View Post
    Do yourself a favour and don't do this with vanilla beans.
    Have you tried it, if so what was the outcome?

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