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Thread: No one can answer this question...

  1. #1
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    No one can answer this question...

    Why is coasting your roast bad?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    To get to the other side?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    I assume by coasting you mean maintaining a temp, neither rising nor falling, kind of simmering, or are you referring to stalling?

    Why not roast a batch, let it "coast" describe the process and let us know how it turns out.

  4. #4
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    It's probably because no one understands the question?
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    I suspect that 'coasting' refers to the period of resting/de-gassing beans after roasting, but you know....who knows.

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    mbg963 and Wynton87 like this.

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    I think the OP means turning the roaster's heating off after the FC ends or thereabouts and letting the beans "coast" on the accumulated drum heat, at very low ROR. I didn't know it was a bad thing, links would be appreciated.
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  8. #8
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roburu View Post
    I think the OP means turning the roaster's heating off after the FC ends or thereabouts and letting the beans "coast" on the accumulated drum heat, at very low ROR. I didn't know it was a bad thing, links would be appreciated.
    I often kill the heat on a roast when there is sufficient momentum after the start of first crack to continue the roast to the required level without going to a stall and baking the beans. When I first started doing this I used to get very nervous not wanting to waste a batch but getting to know your roaster and it's capabilities gives one confidence to do this. Roaster Torrefattore 2kg perforated drum electric.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenman View Post
    Roaster Torrefattore 2kg perforated drum electric.
    Apologies for the off topic but how do you compare your new drum roaster to your old Corretto in terms of the characteristics it imparts to the coffee? Is it easier to get, say, a sweeter, more balanced roast or since it's a perforated drum it it's fairly similar to an air roaster?

  10. #10
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by roburu View Post
    Apologies for the off topic but how do you compare your new drum roaster to your old Corretto in terms of the characteristics it imparts to the coffee? Is it easier to get, say, a sweeter, more balanced roast or since it's a perforated drum it it's fairly similar to an air roaster?
    I have had the roaster for several years now ruburu, I noticed subtle differences when I started doing roasts in Torre compared to the Corretto, instead of going from first crack to 2nd crack in around 4-5 minutes like in Corretto I found that 2-2.5minutes was sufficient development time in the drum with air flow control from around 150C to end of roast. It has a combination of conductive, radiant and convective heat and produces a great result for batches from 300g up to 1800g. An 1800g roast will reach first crack at 12m30sec and I usually hit the cooler at 14.30-15.00min. mark just shy of the first snaps of second crack.

  11. #11
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    Sorry to clarify what I mean is when you let the beans cool slowly for example using the behmor or gene inbuilt cooling system instead of rapid cooling outside the machine. Assuming you can predict same end result in terms of colour. Then what difference will slow vs rapid cool make to end result? Ta.

  12. #12
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    Bump? Why do people prefer cooling externally?

  13. #13
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Faster. But not the final word by any means

    If you leave the beans in a hot roaster to cool even with the power off, they will keep cooking. But this is no biggie really, because as you tweak your technique for taste in something like a Behmor, you will counter the effect this has by powering off earlier. Then a longer in-roaster cool will help to gently finish off the roast in effect. But if you power hard right to second crack or past - you'll want to drop and cool as quickly as possible…
    Last edited by DesigningByCoffee; 22nd February 2017 at 11:17 AM.
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  14. #14
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    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Thanks designingbycoffee. Ok so as long as I can predict final result it shouldn't be a problem, I can continue to just blow a fan into the behmor.

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