Results 1 to 11 of 11
Like Tree6Likes
  • 1 Post By DesigningByCoffee
  • 1 Post By Barry O'Speedwagon
  • 2 Post By DesigningByCoffee
  • 1 Post By Barry O'Speedwagon
  • 1 Post By Beandrinkin

Thread: Dry Mouthfeel - Yirgacheffe roast

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    21

    Dry Mouthfeel - Yirgacheffe roast

    Hi

    I've had a recurring issue with a yirg roast...using a Behmor.

    This has happened in two different roasts from two separate batches of beans.

    Using the p1 till 1st crack gets going/p2 till finish method, I've ended up with roasts that have an odd, dry mouth/tannin like feel.

    The flavour is not bitter as such, it just has an astringent under tone.

    One of these roasts was relatively light, the other pulled closer to second crack.

    Any insight on what is happening and how to avoid?


    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    3,661
    How long are you resting the beans before consuming? If the beans are lightly roasted, you will have a citrus like acidity.Try leaving for at least 10 days before consuming.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    89
    You could also try tasting plain water through the group and basket just to rule that out...

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    21
    Beans tasted after 10 days so prob rule that out. Other coffee tastes fine so not thinking it is a water issue. but thanks for the suggestions.

  5. #5
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Millthorpe NSW
    Posts
    1,827
    I've found that Yirg behaves a little differently to other Ethiopians, and you can get away with a slower profile than say a Harrar. This will build some extra body and sweetness. I don't use a Bemor, but I often roast yirg with the same profile as I would a central or indonesian.
    Beandrinkin likes this.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PRL
    Posts
    2,119
    Assuming a 400g load (in summer, drop payload as weather gets cooler), I use 100% power for 12 mins (60% of max roast cycle), drop to 75%, first crack will be somewhere around 14 mins 30 seconds to 15 mins 30 seconds. When rolling first crack has definitely establish I drop power to 50% and if I'm feeling funky drop to 25% a bit later. Works well for me (on most beans).

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    Assuming a 400g load (in summer, drop payload as weather gets cooler), I use 100% power for 12 mins (60% of max roast cycle), drop to 75%, first crack will be somewhere around 14 mins 30 seconds to 15 mins 30 seconds. When rolling first crack has definitely establish I drop power to 50% and if I'm feeling funky drop to 25% a bit later. Works well for me (on most beans).
    Thanks. Will give that profile a try.
    Do you pre-heat. If so, what method?

  8. #8
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PRL
    Posts
    2,119
    Quote Originally Posted by Beandrinkin View Post
    Thanks. Will give that profile a try.
    Do you pre-heat. If so, what method?
    No, I don't pre-heat. In winter (I'm in Canberra) I wait till the ambient temperature rises to a sensible level before roasting.
    DesigningByCoffee likes this.

  9. #9
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Millthorpe NSW
    Posts
    1,827
    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    In winter (I'm in Canberra) I wait till the ambient temperature rises to a sensible level before roasting.
    Been there! -5 and arctic wind through an open garage can makes winter roasting a challenge in the 'high country!'
    Dimal and Barry O'Speedwagon like this.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PRL
    Posts
    2,119
    Quote Originally Posted by DesigningByCoffee View Post
    Been there! -5 and arctic wind through an open garage can makes winter roasting a challenge in the 'high country!'
    Yeh, I have to watch the weather forecast. Some days are just not an option. If desperate I put the Behmor in the kitchen directly under the range hood (there's nothing flamable within 2 metres). The trick here is when a winter fog hangs around til midday, and the temperature can stay around 0 to 2 degrees until it clears.
    DesigningByCoffee likes this.

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    21
    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Cool. I'm in cold climate also, but roast inside. Don't seem to get any smoke, just the aroma. Will go back to not pre heating also, see how that goes.
    DesigningByCoffee likes this.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •