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Thread: Air fryer roasting - temperature ramp advice?

  1. #1
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    Question Air fryer roasting - temperature ramp advice?

    Hello coffeesnobs, i was hoping to get your advice on the best way to ramp temperature when doing home roasting, specifically in an air fryer.

    I've created a very similar setup to what Tomlil01 describes here:
    Kogan Air-fryer roasting
    looks like this:
    http://coffeesnobs.com.au/attachment...708_231021.jpg

    Essentially its an 1300w electric oven that uses a heat lamp and a fan, plus has a rotating drum. I've modified mine same way Tomlil01 has, but wiring in a PID (temperature controller), so i can set/change temperature of the air-fryer in a custom way.

    I've only finished setting this up today and have done a couple of test roasts, but am not sure if im ramping the temperature the best way.

    I'm using green Ethiopian Harrar Longberry beans, 130g (about 3/4 of a cup) in the roaster.
    I've tried 2 diff methods, 1 without preheating at all, the other with preheating to 150C.
    Here are my temp charts.
    For the 1st one i didnt note down 1st crack unfortunately.
    For the 2nd one, 1st crack and 2nd crack are noted, although i found that the batch i left just past 2nd crack was horribly burnt.
    202C seems to be the max this air fryer is capable of (even though box says 250C), holds this temp ok but cant get any higher.

    https://imgur.com/gallery/v3TzM

    Any advice on how to ramp temperature best with this setup?

    thanks in advance!
    Last edited by dimitryp; 14th December 2017 at 10:04 PM.

  2. #2
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    no one's got any advice?

  3. #3
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dimitryp View Post
    no one's got any advice?
    Hi dimitryp
    Unfortunately I think you'll be dealing with a fairly limited pool of knowledge. Have you thought about PM'ing Lee directly?

    With so few people (well, only one other potentially!) using your sort of roaster, giving roasting advice would be a stab in the dark for the rest of us. In general, I would roast Harrar faster than most other beans, with an increasing temp input ramp to first crack, slowing input temp steadily then dropping them a little before second crack. But how you'd achieve that in your air fryer would be hard to say.

    Probably the best way to get general feedback on your roasting is to let us know how your beans taste … "horribly burnt" doesn't give a whole lot to work with. Are they ashy? Sour? Flat? Acidic? Sweet? We might be able to help some more then in shaping how you are using your roaster…

    Cheers Matt
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  4. #4
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dimitryp View Post
    Essentially its an 1300w electric oven that uses a heat lamp and a fan, plus has a rotating drum. I've modified mine same way Tomlil01 has, but wiring in a PID (temperature controller), so i can set/change temperature of the air-fryer in a custom way.
    Welcome "dimitryp"...

    Basically, just what Matt has said above really...
    With regard to the PID Loop, what are you using to sense the temperature in your roaster, and where (roughly) would it be sited with respect to the bean mass when loaded. This has a marked effect on the relative accuracy of the reported profile and of course, the end results in the cup. It aids repeatability too if it is more representative of the reality within the bean mass...

    If the sensing device is just measuring air temp. then the level of controllability is much reduced unfortunately...

    Mal.

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    Thanks for the response, guys. Being quite new to the coffee roasting game, i sort of assumed there's a "best" temperature curve for roasting beans, irrespective of the device you use to achieve that temperature, but perhaps that isnt so.

    The temperature measurements im getting are from a thermoucouple that comes with the PID. I put the thermoucouple into the main chamber of the fryer, a couple of cm's from the edge of the rotisserie cage. I'd say it would be a pretty accurate measurement of the air temperature right next to the beans.

    Could i ask what "drop" means in the context of roasting?
    Currently i've let the temperature ramp the way the oven does it by default, but sounds like i need to flatten out the temperature rise after 1st crack? I might try that.
    Presently the way im roasting them, my wife recons the beans come out tasting a bit ashy and bitter. This is after resting for 7 days.

    Btw, have i selected a bean that is difficult to roast? (Harrar Longberry). I chose this one at random. Are there more forgiving beans for the home roaster?

    thanks!

  6. #6
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dimitryp View Post
    Thanks for the response, guys. Being quite new to the coffee roasting game, i sort of assumed there's a "best" temperature curve for roasting beans, irrespective of the device you use to achieve that temperature, but perhaps that isnt so.
    The type of profile that works best with individual home-roaster setups will be intrinsic to each type. The "best" profile will be the one that produces the results in the cup that you are aiming for...

    Generically though, you probably should aim for a profile that sits somewhere between 12-20 minutes from start to finish, with a tapering off of heat input after 1st-Crack has well and truly started.

    Quote Originally Posted by dimitryp View Post
    The temperature measurements im getting are from a thermoucouple that comes with the PID. I put the thermoucouple into the main chamber of the fryer, a couple of cm's from the edge of the rotisserie cage. I'd say it would be a pretty accurate measurement of the air temperature right next to the beans.
    Ah, rightio...
    Of course, ideally, you really want to measure the temperature of the bean mass itself but by keeping careful records of every roast batch you do, including the results in the cup afterwards, you should be able to correlate the Air Temp. to a roast profile that consistently creates good results.

    Quote Originally Posted by dimitryp View Post
    Could i ask what "drop" means in the context of roasting?
    It originates from professional commercial roasting and indicates the temperature of the roasting environment when the load of green beans are introduced or "Dropped" into the roaster. Relates mainly to large Commercial Drum Roasters but some CSers also do this with their own home-built roasters of various forms.

    Quote Originally Posted by dimitryp View Post
    Currently i've let the temperature ramp the way the oven does it by default, but sounds like i need to flatten out the temperature rise after 1st crack? I might try that.
    Yep, definitely a good thing to do.

    Quote Originally Posted by dimitryp View Post
    Presently the way im roasting them, my wife recons the beans come out tasting a bit ashy and bitter. This is after resting for 7 days.
    Sounds like you're taking the beans into 2nd-Crack perhaps a little too far or using excessive heat causing the beans to scorch.
    Generally speaking, it's better to dump and cool the beans just before 2nd-Crack starts when you are first starting out. After you have a better handle on the characteristics of your particular setup, you could then start to try modifying your roast profiles a little one way or the other, and take particular note of the effects it has on the results in the cup - The only thing that matters.

    Quote Originally Posted by dimitryp View Post
    Btw, have i selected a bean that is difficult to roast? (Harrar Longberry). I chose this one at random. Are there more forgiving beans for the home roaster?
    No, it's not particularly difficult to roast but probably not ideal for the first one to learn on.
    If you can, grab a bag of PNG Wahgi AA, Peru CdS AAA or India Elephant Hills AA to start out with. Each of these are a pleasure to roast and produce excellent results in the cup, for all manner of coffee consumption.

    I'm not meaning to harp on about it but you need to keep good records of each roast batch, recording each milestone through the progression of the profile to the point that you drop and cool the batch. All information gathered will assist with future batch profiles as you focus in on your preferred end result...

    All the best mate,
    Mal.
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  7. #7
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    Sounds like you're taking the beans into 2nd-Crack perhaps a little too far or using excessive heat causing the beans to scorch.
    Generally speaking, it's better to dump and cool the beans just before 2nd-Crack starts when you are first starting out. After you have a better handle on the characteristics of your particular setup, you could then start to try modifying your roast profiles a little one way or the other, and take particular note of the effects it has on the results in the cup - The only thing that matters.
    Mal.
    All good information Mal, however IMO this point in particular needs close attention, things happen fast toward the end of a roast, you really do need to have your ducks in a row at this point and be prepared to act quickly, decide at what temp you want to stop the roast and do it, no time for distractions here, if the phone rings ignore it, an extra 30 seconds here may well be the difference between a great roast and a burnt bloody mess.
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    Thanks Dimal, all very useful tips.
    Going to do some roasting today, so will put some of this advice into practice
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    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    All good information Mal, however IMO this point in particular needs close attention, things happen fast toward the end of a roast, you really do need to have your ducks in a row at this point and be prepared to act quickly, decide at what temp you want to stop the roast and do it, no time for distractions here, if the phone rings ignore it, an extra 30 seconds here may well be the difference between a great roast and a burnt bloody mess.
    +1 to this, hehe so true. As first crack is finishing, the music gets turned off, the chair gets pulled closer to the roaster, and my eyes are 100% FIXATED on the roast without deviation.

    Doorbell rings... hmm thought i heard a noise...

    Phone rings... what's a phone?


    I get superfocused and the world fades away, it really is a critical time XD. Even 15 seconds can make a big difference!

  10. #10
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Haha...

    Even our dogs know to stay away from me when 1st-Crack starts...
    I kind of get a look that says, "Oh no, here we go again, gonna get told to go to our beds."

    Mal.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    Quote Originally Posted by Dimal View Post
    Haha...

    Even our dogs know to stay away from me when 1st-Crack starts...
    I kind of get a look that says, "Oh no, here we go again, gonna get told to go to our beds."

    Mal.
    Love it Mal, that's the attitude you need.
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