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Thread: All about soy milk? coddles and storage.

  1. #1
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    All about soy milk? coddles and storage.

    Hi there,

    I'm a new owner of a cafe. I was having trouble frothing soy milk and it's my least favourite but I've found it easier to work with, if refrigerated. I'm always worried of over heating soy as it can coddle quickly and that's why I prefer to have it cold...when frothing.

    Ive hired the barista from the previous owner who has particular ways of doing things and I understand that soy milk has a shelf life but once it's been refrigerated it can't be back on the shelf right? Because that's what she did...she took my soy milk (though unopened) from the fridge and back on the shelf. It's been a couple of days and when she went to open it finally, she found it all coddled and off. now she's demanding me to get a refund from our supplier....which I'm not going to do.

    Are there any tips on better soy milk frothing? Is it just technique? what soy brand will you recommend? and any tips on how I find a middle ground with the current barista?

    thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    As a drinker of soy milk my second crack: Whilst more expensive, Bonsoy is by far the best soy milk to have in coffee, different brands of soy milk vary in flavour considerably. We'll check what type of soy milk a cafe uses before ordering, and not order if it's something other than Bonsoy, usually.
    Regarding frothing, the bubbles are usually a bit larger, you don't easily (i've seen it rarely) get the creamy froth of regular milk.

  3. #3
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    I used to work in the Dairy industry and we did dabble in soy milk. Your barista is correct (at least for most soy milks).

    Most soy milks are UHT treated so they are shelf stable - like long life milk. So you should be able to put it in the fridge for a few days, then take it out and put it on the shelf until the use by date has passed (or refrigerate again when you need more). The UHT treatment means there is essentially no living micro-organisms in the milk, so there is nothing to spoil it like long life milk. This is true with most soy milks but not all.
    Similar to long life milk, once opened they should be chilled used within a few days as you have exposed the milk to micro-organisms in the air which will spoil it.

    On a coffee side, I find soy milk must be kept cold like regular milk to foam correctly and I find you have to heat it less. 60 degrees is the max I would go to, otherwise it does tend to split/coddled.
    No significant difference in technique from regular milk I find - although I am no purveyor of soy drinks.

  4. #4
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    I don't drink the stuff myself, but my wife does, so I make a couple of almond lattes a day. Blue diamond unsweetened micro froths well. My wife keeps drinking it, so it must taste OK. All other makes have been rejected for one reason or another.
    Last edited by WarrenK; 4th September 2017 at 09:58 AM. Reason: Checked label

  5. #5
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    By coddled do you mean curdled?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by level3ninja View Post
    By coddled do you mean curdled?
    Not entirely. Curdled usually means spoiled by going off (ie sour). Coddled is heated to below a boiling point, but split which makes it lump. Perfectly safe to drink, just lumpy and gross... Unless you are into that sort of thing.

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    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    Ah, there you go. Thanks.

  8. #8
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    I've tried a few different soy milk alternatives and I prefer Bonsoy over everything else. The soy beans used are organic and their production method is the best. I've found it has the best (you could say least) flavour and is the easiest to use. Vitasoy Barista is a suitable cheaper alternative if you can't get or can't afford Bonsoy. Everything else I've tried was terrible.

  9. #9
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    I'm based in the UK and lactose intolerant. The best option I've found by far is oat milk by Oatly (not sure how available this is oversees though).

    They do a 'Barista edition', which is designed to be frothed. I buy the UHT version. Even when it's not frothed, it doesn't suffer the same separation that many other milk alternatives do when they hit hot liquids.

    Oat milk had less of a sour (to my taste) flavour than soy too.

  10. #10
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    Have you got lactose free dairy milk in the UK? We have that here and I find it's just the same as regular dairy milk to steam and tastes almost identical

    liddell-s-lactose-free-full-cream-milk-1l-9473.jpg

  11. #11
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    We do. I might give it a try. I do kinda like the oat taste now though. It suits beans with chocolate/caramel tones.

  12. #12
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    Hey,
    UK based barista here.
    So, coddling ie soya milk turning clumpy is down to a variety of factors, acidity, rapid temperature change, brand of soy used, whether it has been refrigerated first. In my experience it tends to be more likely when soy is added to an Americano than a latte, flat white or cappuccino. I've only had it happen the once in about a year as a barista. Some beans will be more acidic than others and you can't tell via taste.
    We use in-house soy milk (I work for Marks and Spencer) with a 4 day shelf life and store it in the fridge. Our store and café soy milk is always kept in the large fridges upstairs or the small fridge in the café. There doesn't seem to be any difference in results from the shop floor vs café specific one. I have a DeLonghi coffee machine at home and I'm using Alpro on it with no issues.
    WhateverBeansNecessary says
    Most soy milks are UHT treated so they are shelf stable - like long life milk
    but I'm wondering if the temperature where you are (can't tell from the original post) is high enough that soy might curdle anyway? I know in previous experiments of mine attempting to deliberately curdle soy for a recipe which required it to make something rise we had limited success with Alpro unless the weather was hot.
    Soy should only be taken up to 55 degrees c.
    Technique wise, open up your steamer the whole way, angle the nozzle at the side but not edge of the jug, if doing latte milk you want about three seconds of the 'sss' hiss then you move the nozzle so it is swirling around the jug, cappuccino milk you get the three seconds and sort of follow the hiss up the side of the jug. Make sure you tap and swirl the milk before it goes under the steamer to get rid of large bubbles (pouring into a tilted jug like you would pour beer to end up with less head helps with this so try and get the two edges of the milk jug and the milk carton relatively flat to each other) and when it comes out from underneath it. If you're doing a latte the milk should be an emulsion, glossy and smooth like a tin of freshly opened emulsion paint and you pour from the spout of the jug slowly in circles until you get near to the top and then you make any patterns. Cappuccino you pour from the side, touch the jug to the cup.
    Sometimes the milk will look over frothy - this just means more tapping and swirling until that fluffy clumpy island in the middle of a cappuccino goes or until the latte milk recombines and goes glossy.

    I hope this helps a bit! Good luck with your barista (have you tried asking why she stores it out of the fridge?) and your milk!

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