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Thread: Milk pours smooth and then small bubbles appear?

  1. #1
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    Milk pours smooth and then small bubbles appear?

    Hi all,

    I'm trying to refine my milk texture and I've always had (what I think is) an issue where the milk pours fairly smooth but then small bubbles start to appear in the crema.

    Is this an issue to do with my milk texture?

    Maybe my micro foam isn't tight enough so it's not holding together?

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    FW_02.JPG
    Last edited by dbun; 3 Weeks Ago at 03:41 PM. Reason: Photo added

  2. #2
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    As in, they're appearing instantly after pouring? Or after a certain period of time?

    When the complete drink sits for long enough, fine bubbles will start to surface regardless of milk texture.

    If it's fairly instant after pouring, I'd probably pin it on your milk texture.

    When you're steaming milk, aim to have the milk stretched to it's final volume within the first 3-5 seconds, then it's all finessing the texture of the milk without expanding it further.

    "Stretching" as I call it needs to happen in as little time as possible in order to allow maximum time for the air bubbles to be incorporated/mixed together to create that really silky finish you see on well textured milk.

    If you need any extra help, send through a little video perhaps.

    Cheers!
    tashie and dbun like this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Acidic coffee can also produce the bubbles you see appear in your crema.
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    Member woodhouse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    Acidic coffee can also produce the bubbles you see appear in your crema.
    i think this is your issue, as the bubbles are concentrated in your crema rather than your milk. super-fresh coffee will do that.
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  5. #5
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    I'll work on my milk texturing - I do think I might be stretching a bit too long, so I'll work on that part to see if it helps.

    Might try some different beans too just to see if there's a difference.

    It doesn't bother me too much as I have seen the same thing at some cafes, but always keen to see if I can improve!
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  6. #6
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
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    I doubt youíll be able to improve that through technique. I agree that itís probably some fresh or lighter roasted coffee causing that, but it can also be the type of milk you use as well. Often if itís the milk youíll see it across the whole drink, but not always. Trying some different coffee is a good idea as this will eliminate this first.

  7. #7
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    Just to be clear, is your question about a) bubbles in the milk, or b) bubbles in the crema? These are two separate issues.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tashie View Post
    Just to be clear, is your question about a) bubbles in the milk, or b) bubbles in the crema? These are two separate issues.
    I guess it would be the bubbles in the crema - as shown in the picture the bubbles are concentrated in the crema rather than the actual milk, which is what normally happens.

    I just wasn't sure if it was to do with my milk and/or maybe pouring technique as the bubbles aren't really there after I pull the shot and only appear after pouring the milk.

  9. #9
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    As other's have stated - try a different coffee to start with. Very fresh coffee degasses and created CO2 bubbles on the surface of the drink. This if exaggerated MORE if you are using very soft water. It creates a sort of carbonation effect.

    What you can also try is:

    Initially pour some milk into your espresso (this is where you begin to mix milk/crema together before you pour your art)

    Give the cup a gentle wiggle in a circular motion to further mix the milk and crema together, then continue to pour your art. It's a sort of cheat way to deal with the degassing issue with fresh coffee.

    Hope this helps!

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