Results 1 to 17 of 17
Like Tree7Likes
  • 1 Post By tim
  • 1 Post By Otago
  • 1 Post By TampIt
  • 1 Post By tim
  • 1 Post By MrJack
  • 1 Post By level3ninja
  • 1 Post By Rocky

Thread: Handwriting?????

  1. #1
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    5,197

    Handwriting?????

    Handwriting, longhand, cursive, linked script or block letters! a topic that comes up regularly in social conversation.

    In years past good penmanship was greatly admired and certainly used as an indicator of a persons educational achievements.

    Nowadays with the advent of computers/printers and the demise of letter writing in the traditional manner, the skill seems to be fading fast.

    Wondering what the feeling of other Coffee Snobs is on the subject?

    This link prompted my post.
    Does your handwriting mark you out as a leader?

  2. #2
    tim
    tim is offline
    Administrator
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    245
    I learnt to write in Tasmanian schools in a style called Cord Cursive.
    It was very regimented and we had to practice to rhythmic music, writing 1 letter over and over again, first with short, beveled fat crayons called "Chubbi Stumps" (I kid you not) and then with a 2B pencil.
    Finally in Grade 3 (1971) I could have a Bic ballpoint.
    It's a very fancy and antique-looking style but very fast.
    I've not met anyone in Victoria where I now live that writes like this.
    I must admit, my form has suffered through years of using computers to type.
    Miss Bardenhagen would not be happy! :-)

    Tim
    Magic_Matt likes this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    5,197
    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    I learnt to write in Tasmanian schools in a style called Cord Cursive.
    It was very regimented and we had to practice to rhythmic music, writing 1 letter over and over again, first with short, beveled fat crayons called "Chubbi Stumps" (I kid you not) and then with a 2B pencil.
    Finally in Grade 3 (1971) I could have a Bic ballpoint.
    It's a very fancy and antique-looking style but very fast.
    I've not met anyone in Victoria where I now live that writes like this.
    I must admit, my form has suffered through years of using computers to type.
    Miss Bardenhagen would not be happy! :-)

    Tim
    Interesting information Tim.

    Had never previously heard of Cord Cursive, so naturally hit Google for enlightenment, quite a bit on the subject, including an article from the SMH written by Mel Campbell in 2014, with references to Cord Cursive as well as a lot of additional information Students' handwriting remains the mark of learning
    Sadly no mention of Miss Bardenhagen.

    From the article,
    "In 1959, the Australian Women's Weekly reported Tasmanian state schools were trialling an American handwriting style called Cord Cursive. Students praised it as "fun" and "less tiring"; more importantly, its speed "amazed" parents. A 144-word writing sample took 12 minutes to complete in the new cursive, but 20 minutes in the old copperplate."

    Dated though it may be, I'm an admirer of Copperplate, my writing leaves a lot to be desired, doesn't come close to the example below.


  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Hobart TAS
    Posts
    119
    This thread brings back one of the great injustices of my life.

    Being a Tasmanian, I was taught cord cursive in primary school (circa 1956). Being a left hander I was having some difficulty with achieving the / slope of the characters and, having made some enquiry of the teacher, was told left handlers could slope the other way. Apparently she meant the book, not the characters, so when I produced a sample text sloped \ this was taken to be a gross subordination and I was marched off to the Headmaster to end up with the cuts. (Bamboo cane across the hand for you delicate millennials) No, it wasn't Miss Bardenhagen!

    I must agree that modern means of communication are having a drastic effect on the standard of hand writing. I now do most of my communication by email etc and found, when I recently had to write a letter, that it did not come naturally, and that I had to make a conscious effort to do so.
    Magic_Matt likes this.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Magic_Matt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Northlandia
    Posts
    1,299
    I'd never heard the term cord cursive, but suppose that's probably what I learned. I do recall those endless lines of joined Cs and Es in particular...

    My handwriting now is awful; I work in IT after all. 😔

  6. #6
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    5,197
    Quote Originally Posted by Otago View Post
    This thread brings back one of the great injustices of my life.

    Being a Tasmanian, I was taught cord cursive in primary school (circa 1956). Being a left hander I was having some difficulty with achieving the / slope of the characters and, having made some enquiry of the teacher, was told left handlers could slope the other way. Apparently she meant the book, not the characters, so when I produced a sample text sloped \ this was taken to be a gross subordination and I was marched off to the Headmaster to end up with the cuts. (Bamboo cane across the hand for you delicate millennials) No, it wasn't Miss Bardenhagen!
    Ah yes! memories of a bygone era, certainly different attitudes back then, I guess that's another topic entirely.

    I doubt many kids enjoy the discipline demanded of writing lessons, those of us who were diligent reapt the rewards.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Rockingham W.A.
    Posts
    957
    Quote Originally Posted by Magic_Matt View Post
    I'd never heard the term cord cursive, but suppose that's probably what I learned. I do recall those endless lines of joined Cs and Es in particular...

    My handwriting now is awful; I work in IT after all. 
    I learnt "running writing" at a range* of NSW schools in the 1950s. They were trialling a number of different styles so every 3 months (or so) when I changed schools there was a different form of writing on the blackboard.

    After about 7 or 8 different styles I ran into a school (Riverina area???) teaching what they called "Modern Italic Loopless". I can still recall my shock when I walked into a history lesson on the first day and I couldn't read anything on the blackboard. For the unitiated it is a minimalist italic form which has no loops at all (i.e. both sans serif and sans loops). Whatever hope my legible handwriting had, it went out the window at that school.

    You can imagine the mess my "running writing" is - being a non repeatable combination of all of the various styles where the previous letter largely dictates the style of the next letter. When I look at my own handwritten notes I feel the need for a translator... it is incredibly hard to read.

    Ironically, I also ended up in IT (after quite a few career detours) where I print everything - I only learnt one style of printing (although that is Italic!).


    TampIt
    *range of schools: 23 primary schools and 4 high schools across 4 states, mostly NSW before my father's Civil / Safety Engineering career "settled down a little". Never was at a school long enough to get kicked out of any of them.
    Magic_Matt likes this.

  8. #8
    tim
    tim is offline
    Administrator
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    245

    Ditto

    Quote Originally Posted by Magic_Matt View Post
    I'd never heard the term cord cursive, but suppose that's probably what I learned. I do recall those endless lines of joined Cs and Es in particular...

    My handwriting now is awful; I work in IT after all. 
    20+ years of It work too.
    My handwriting is dreadful.
    Magic_Matt likes this.

  9. #9
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    15,505
    Quote Originally Posted by Otago View Post
    I was taught cord cursive in primary school (circa 1956).
    I believe that was what we were taught as well....
    Long time ago now.

    Mal.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,331
    When I was in primary school (in the 80s) they changed the handwriting style that was taught (twice I think).

    As a result my handwriting is a terrible, barely legible mixture of these.
    Magic_Matt likes this.

  11. #11
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Casula, NSW
    Posts
    534
    The handwriting style I was taught never changed through school, so I have terrible handwriting but without an excuse.
    Dimal likes this.

  12. #12
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    3,696
    I learned modern cursive in the sixties, at first with chalk on a slate board, then we progressed to pen and ink which meant blotted pages and blue fingers.

    My handwriting is now so bad the character recognition on my tablet PC can read it better than I can.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Central Queensland
    Posts
    819
    Although a bit artistic and a compulsive 'recorder' of things, my cursive writing was always pretty untidy.
    At University I quickly found that the copious notes I took in lectures were difficult to read back at home.
    Consequently I developed a kind of composite that looked neater and which I could read easily when swotting for exams.
    In those days all our assignments were handwritten so it was essential that they were legible.
    (all this came back to haunt me years later when I was marking exam essays hand written by Uni students)
    Here is what my own script looks like.


  14. #14
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    5,197
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    Although a bit artistic and a compulsive 'recorder' of things, my cursive writing was always pretty untidy.
    At University I quickly found that the copious notes I took in lectures were difficult to read back at home.
    Consequently I developed a kind of composite that looked neater and which I could read easily when swotting for exams.
    In those days all our assignments were handwritten so it was essential that they were legible.
    (all this came back to haunt me years later when I was marking exam essays hand written by Uni students)
    Here is what my own script looks like.

    See what you mean by composite Rocky, very easy to read, wish my efforts were up to this standard, sadly not the case, I'd be too embarrassed to show any of my scratchings.

    I've a feeling artistic ability and a nice flowing hand kind of go together, my wife has always had nice handwriting, and, has also recently (last couple of years) discovered she is quite artistic, better late than never.

    When it comes to illegible writing the medical profession has it in spades.

    As a matter of interest, are you a Mollydooker?

    PS I'm also a big fan of Jethro Tull, had tickets to see them in Adelaide 1973, had to make an unscheduled trip to the US, missed the show, my wife finished up seeing them with a friend, said it was an unforgettable evening, talks about it to this day.
    Last edited by Yelta; 29th June 2017 at 05:23 PM.

  15. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    CHC NZ
    Posts
    7
    I was in NZ primary school during the mid-2000s, we were taught cursive (modified D'Nealian?) for a couple of weeks. I then just went back to print. However I have being writing in cursive for the past few months, but I am also using print and caps. Here is a sample (please ignore the content, still going through high school)

  16. #16
    Senior Member Rocky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Central Queensland
    Posts
    819
    Yelta, years later I ended up in a job where I spent a fair amount of time trying to decipher Doctor's handwriting. Other staff would bring reports to me to decipher and it became a bit of a game.
    No, I'm Right dominant (it does lean backwards a tiny bit, doesn't it).
    Lifelong passionate Jethro Tull fan here. Wish I had seen them back in the '70s when Ian still had his voice.
    They (that is to say Ian and whoever else is with him) still put on a good show but the trademark Tull vocals just aren't there anymore.
    These days Ian writes material that suit his vocal abilities.
    I have been re-listening to 'TAAB 2', and 'Homo Erraticus' lately and they have merit but just don't fire me up the way the earlier ones do.
    Yelta likes this.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Rockingham W.A.
    Posts
    957
    Guilty, another Tull fan. Saw them in the early 80's(?) live - brilliant concert, unfortunately in the worst acoustics of any Perth Venue (Michael Edgeley "Entertainment Centre" [sic, quotes deserved]). Purchased all their Vinyl up to "A" as they came out. Also have all their "non compilation" CDs (from "A" onwards plus replicated the earlier vinyls) - digital playlist just over 35 hours including a couple of rare-ish bootlegs.

    Aqualung, TAAB(orig), XMas song (This Was) and the amazing versions of Bach's Bouree in E minor (6 variants I love) & Rocks on the Road (A little light music & In Concert - 1991, not the studio one) are always the first things I think of playing and then I get hooked all over again and play them all from "This Was" in chronological order. Damn, forgot about We Used to Know, Bungle in the jungle and Lick your fingers clean until the titles came up... and so it goes.

    Oh well, I will probably play something else on Monday or Tuesday next week... (Friday night as I start by playing the R O T R ALLM version and then loaded the lot).

    Ian's voice has mostly recovered, although his range is more limited these days.

    BTW, I am another one who used to be asked to translate doctor's handwriting. Maybe because no one else in the place could read my writing?

    Enjoy your cuppa and your Tull.

    TampIt

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •