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Thread: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

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    A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    I decided to start this thread after seeing alot of the same questions from people new to roasting. In the few months I have been roasting I have kept a journal so have used this to come up with a guide to *starting out. If anyboody else has anything else feel free to add them.

    The Popper
    Firstly, have a look at the specs of your popper (wattage) from my own reading of the many different poppers used by roasters this seems to really affect the time of your roast. I may be wrong but a higher wattage seems to give a higher temp in a shorter time than a lower wattage popper.

    I myself have a Cascade Popper that I bought at the Warehouse. It is a bit smaller than the breville poppers and only 1100 watts compared to the breville which is 1200. The cascade will only do a maximum of 100g of beans at a time, however my roasts do take longer usually up to about 7 minutes depending on the ambient temperature on the day. A longer roast is what you are trying to achieve so the sugars in the beans have a chance to develop their subtle individual flavour with out overroasting and burning.


    The Chimney
    Make a chimney for your popper, do this by getting an old soup can and cut a few slits in one end. Bend these in so the can fits snugly into the top of the popper. I also use the plastic dooflicky thing that came with the popper to act as an extra holder just in case you knock the chimney and stops it from falling off too easily, this is also great to help hold my thermocouple in place.

    Personally I have found a popper tha best thing to start out with as it is cheap, you can really see what is happening, it is relatively hands free with no stirring except maybe right at the beginning. I have found that I also really started to get an understanding of the roasting process too


    Thermocouple and Data recorder
    Let me start of by saying that this is not someting you need to have, but I have found mine invaluable when I first started roasting. It was a useful guide in getting to know my popper and also knowing when to judge when to expect first and second crack to start and finish and the temperatures the popper and beans are at when this occurs. The majority of people here use these, they cost about $25 and pay for themselves.

    Stopwatch
    I bought a cheap sportswatch with a stopwatch facility on it from Target and use this to make a minute by minute temperature recording throughout my roast.

    Using this I can record the time and temp of the first pops of first crack, the main part of first crack and the end of first crack. Likewise with second crack. You can also write down any points to remember such as long first crack, short fist crack followed by long gap to second crack etc. Here is an example of what I do


    Ambient temp 17
    Time 0930 hours


    Time (mins) * * * * * * Temp(C)
    1 * * * * * * * * * * * * * *145
    2 * * * * * * * * * * * * * *184
    3 * * * * * * * * * * * * * *201
    4 * * * * * * * * * * * * * *212
    5 * * * * * * * * * * * * * *220
    6 * * * * * * * * * * * * * *228
    7 * * * * * * * * * * * * * *233

    1st crack : 212C/3.44 (first snaps)
    * * * * * * * * 211C/3.57 rolling first
    * * * * * * * * 223C/521 finish

    2nd crack : 233C/655min first snaps
    * * * *
    Roast finished @ 7.05 min/235C - did not reach rolling second crack.

    Roasting Notes:

    Long FC
    nice long gap between FC @ SC
    Distinct first and second crack
    Even roast


    Tasting Notes

    24hrs
    Smooth, mocha flavours with hint of sweetness on the end of the palette. Lingering Vanilla flavours.


    First roast follows
    Last edited by Javaphile; 7th May 2013 at 02:52 PM. Reason: Change text colors for readability

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Your First Roast

    First of all, have alook on here at the variety of beans. If you have bought a starter pack, do a search to find if others have roasted these beans and what results they have had. Pick a variety that others have said they have had good roasting results with. If you cannot find anything, then ask. Even than people may not have roasted *the varieties you have and that is not a problem.

    Weigh out 100g of beans and place them in the popper which has the thermocouple lead in it (this prevents the wire from resting against the side of the popper giving you an inaccurate reading.

    Turn on the popper and the stop watch at the same time. You may need to give the beans a wee stir with the handle of a wooden spoon to get them moving.

    Record the temp at one minute, 2 minutes etc etc. Look at the beans and watch the colour changes they go through during the roast.

    At about 205 - 208 degrees C you will hear the first pops and crackles of first Crack (FC) this can take anything from 2 - 4 minutes depending on your popper and the ambient temperature (the heat of the day), FC will reach a crescendo of popping and crackling and then die down to almost nothing with the occasional pop.

    Once these have settled down is the time when the beans start to develop thier different flavours and this is where you want the roast to take its time. It is very hard to control with a bog standard popper, though it can be done. ( I will discuss this in the next post)

    At about 230 -235C you should hear the first sounds of second crack. This may be very muted and hard to hear and quite often is more of a snapple sound than a distinct crack. On a popper this where you need to be fast, as if you go too far into second crack you can risk over roasting and burning your beans.

    Once you hear second crack stop the stop watch, turn off the popper and very quickly pour the roasted beans into a metal or wire colander. Do not use plastic as the heat of the beans can melt it as some people have found out. *


    Cooling the Beans
    I use a plastic colander and a metal colander, other people have their own methods. After initially tipping the beans into the metal colander, move them around to take the worst of the heat off them. then tip them into the plastic colander from a height of about 10 -20 cm blowing gently to remove the remaining chaff. Keep doing this until the beans have cooled down and leave them in the plastic colander to cool to room temperature.

    Once they have reached room temp, place them in oneway valved bags to De Gas for a few days (or at least 24 hours if you cannot wait. ;) )
    Last edited by Javaphile; 7th May 2013 at 02:56 PM. Reason: Change text colors for readibility

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Ambient Temperature and time of day

    It is my belief that this really will affect your roast using a popper. As there are no other ways to really control temperature, I have found that by choosing the outside temp and the time of day I roast to be the most helpful.

    Ambient Temperature
    Ambient temperature is the temperature it is where you are roasting -eg the temperature outside under the patio or in the shed.

    I have found that the cooler the ambient temp the longer the roast. I am now in the habit of not roasting when the temp is above 20C, 25C at a push. 30+ Days make the roast too fast and hard to stop the beans from over roasting.



    Time of day/humidity
    I have found that this does affect the roast - in summer, I havent been roasting in the winter yet so it will be interesting to know what other popper users have found. The dryer the heat of the day, the faster the roast seems to go. I have found that roasting very early in the morning, when there is some humitdity in the air and it is quite cool helps a lot.
    Last edited by Javaphile; 7th May 2013 at 02:57 PM. Reason: Change text colors for readibility

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    For those of you who want to know where to get a thermocouple I got mine at Jaycar.

    You have the choice of two that I have used This one : http://tinyurl.com/svw8y *about $20

    Or the one posted below which is pricesd at about $25. I got this one as it has a little inbuilt stand and has a rubber casing so it will not break as easily if dropped. It also has a little backlight.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Nice work lucinda. As a brand newy to the forum and roasting (only completed my 4th roast today) that is a really handy guide. Im currently working my way through the starter pack.

    I definately recommend that people take note of the effect ambient temperature has on roast times. After reading the forums for a while i was a tad worried when my roasts where going much longer than others 3-6 minutes. Then i checked the temp outside where im roasting. Im down in Hobart and the roast i completed tonight took 18 minutes until 2nd crack in a breville crazy popper with 80g of beans. Ambient temp ... a chilly 12 C

    This may seem slightly odd, but straight after my roast has cooled ive been biting off half of a bean and just tasting the differences in flavor between roasts and also noting the texture & inner color of the bean after roasting. Not sure if others have done this but out of curiosity what texture roughly should a bean have just prior to 2nd crack? ie crumbly? still quite woody? etc

    Cheers

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    That was good lucinda.
    Im going to look for that thermocouple.
    Online they are marked down to $14-95 at the moment.

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy Freeman link=1174563227/15#15 date=1174735506
    So Lucinda and TG, it appears that you could both add something to the home roasting sections.
    Heres my article (recently published online).
    It has a slightly different perspective (no thermocouple).


    Coffee: Roasting your own

    The best coffee is FRESH.
    Freshly roasted coffee from a local roaster may be a little bit more expensive than supermarket bought coffee, but it is worth it.
    Freshly roasted coffee is generally at its best until about 3 weeks of age.

    Green coffee beans can be found at up to a quarter of the price of freshly roasted ones.
    A cheap and easy first step into home roasting is using a popcorn machine; the air roasting type.
    These can be quite cheap to buy new and occasionally you can find them even cheaper second hand.

    You need to make sure the fan holes in the roasting chamber are on the side, so that the hot air spins the beans around the chamber. This type of popper would seem to be the most common type, however you need to make sure the popper is not the other type with the holes in the bottom of the roasting chamber. If you look down into the machine and see holes at the bottom it is the wrong type. The holes you are looking for will be around the sides of the chamber and look like little angled vents.

    Once you have found yourself a popper you’ll need to find some green beans.
    If your local roaster won’t sell you some (don’t blame them, they’re in the business of roasting beans for profit), you may be able to find an online seller; the internet is a wonderful thing. Even with postage costs, green beans will still work out cheaper than buying commercially roasted ones.

    Most poppers should be able to roast 100 grams (3.5 ounces). When you get used to your popper you can experiment with how much or how little it will roast. More beans will roast quicker, less beans will roast slower. 5 to 6 minutes from beginning to end is average for popcorn machine roasts.

    You need to make one modification to make sure your beans don’t jump out as they expand in size and lose weight as they roast. Remove any lid/butter dispenser from the popper and find a tin can the same diameter as the popper’s hole and fit it into the top of the popper. You may have to snip the sides of the can to make it easier to fit if it is not the perfect size.

    Roasting is best done outside as the beans will lose a thin skin, called chaff, in the process. This can be messy and a breeze or fan will help disperse it. Also, as ambient temperature can affect roast length times, I find it best to try roast when the temperature is 20C / 68F or less; evenings or early mornings are usually best.

    Add your beans to the popper and switch it on.
    If the beans don’t start spinning around the roasting chamber straight away, stir them with a long wooden chopstick or similar item until they start spinning by themselves.
    If it takes a long time for them to start spinning, make the next batch a little smaller.

    Now you need to listen for the cracks. First crack is fairly easy to hear. It will be a popping sound like in “snap, crackle, pop”. This will likely happen around the three minute mark. When all the beans have stopped popping, there may be some silence for a few minutes (except for the sound of the popcorn machine and your fan). The second crack is more of a crackle or crinkle. It will be faint; you need to listen closely for it. Around the same time as second crack there will be a lot more smoke. Be prepared to turn off your popper and cool your beans when second crack has been happening for about 10 to 20 seconds on your first effort or if the beans look like they are dark enough compared to what you’ve previously bought or if there’s plenty of smoke.

    To cool them you should empty the beans into a large metal strainer or bowl and pour them back and forth to a second bowl, preferably in front of your fan if you are using one. If not, don’t worry, they will cool as they fall through the air between bowls.

    Hopefully they’ll cool to room temperature within a few minutes. When they are cool you should out them in an airtight bag for a few days before grinding some and trying them. If you can get your hands on some bags with one way valves, they are best because they will allow the beans to de-gas and keep the oxygen out.
    If you can’t get the one way valve bags, use a normal resealable plastic bag and prick a couple of small holes in it to allow the gas to escape. The escaping carbon dioxide will push itself out and keep any oxygen from getting in. Keep your coffee in a cool dark place, not the refrigerator.

    Your freshly home roasted coffee should be ready to sample in two days, as I said above, but will probably continue to improve in flavour until it’s about 10 to 14 days old. After that it may start to lose flavour but, depending on the bean type may still be acceptable until three weeks of age.

    Give it a go. It’s fun and in the long run you’ll save money and should never run out of fresh coffee ever again.
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Thats great TG. It seems that we have both been thinking the same thing lately.

    I hope it really helps others as a quick guide for people who havent a clue.

    Geniuses we is ;D

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Thanks Cindy.
    We geniuses have to stick together.

    Actually, Id written an article for an online game I part-own and after it was published I decided Id try this one as the site had a sub-category specifically for coffee and there were no popper articles amongst the very few on roasting.

    It didnt take very long at all to write, as all I was doing was brain dumping what Ive learned here and from experience.

    It took longer to find the Fahrenheit figures for the Yanks. *;D

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Celsius *= (Fahrenheit *less 32) times 5 divided by 9

    Fahrenheit *= Celsius times 9, divided by 5, *less 32.

    *or...

    Celsius = (Fahrenheit less 32) times *.555555

    Im glad I did science after all.

    --Robusto

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    I just used Google cause I took biology. :P

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    My son did biology -- which set him up to run computer support. Eh?

    --Robusto

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Well I also work with computers and picked up popper roasting rather quickly.
    There must be a connection.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    I just use the conversion widget on my Mac.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Quote Originally Posted by lucinda link=1174699442/0#12 date=1174832608
    I just use the *conversion widget on my Mac.
    Off topic....Widgets also live in the bottom of Guiness cans... ;)

    Back to thread...

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    I roast 2-3 times a week; tried a few methods to cool down the beans and found the best to be a large blackened heavy cast-iron skillet. The dark metal will suck the heat out of the beans like a black hole, almost instantly. Keeping the skillet in the fridge, or even the freezer for a few minutes will, no doubt, improve its performance, not only because of the lower metal temperature but also the thin layer of condensed moisture on the surface which will evaporate while sucking even more heat from its immediate surroundings.
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    An interesting method Ilan.

    I have found that although the method I posted above is sure and simple, I get excellent results from using my shop vac to suck air past the beans in a suitably sized container.
    With my 100g popper batches I use a metal sifter.
    With larger batches I currently use a metal seive held above the vac hose.
    I plan to instal the seive into the top of a bucket, as others have, and then attach my vac hose to a hole in the bucket side.
    The sheer volume of air can cool a 100g batch in 10 seconds.

    Have you tried air cooling?

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Hi TG
    I can see how your method works well in the garage; I roast indoors (kitchen) as it is usually cold outside (S.I.NZ) and try to keep things low-tech. My roasts are 150 grs and fit nicely in a 10 inch skillet. After a few prototypes I came up with an interesting design for a chimney for a corn popper that collects the chaff, and the smoke goes up the range hood leaving just enough fragrant to enjoy. I guess I could take a few pics to demonstrate the gizmo. It seems to accelerate the roasting time a little. Here in NZ because of lower voltage (230V) we actually get less wattage from the same appliances and it is a bit colder too so its not really a problem; roasting 150 grs takes about 6-7 minutes. cooling 10-20 sec.


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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Ilan, where in the mainland are you? Some pics would be interesting.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Lucinda, Im in Canterbury. Will try to take some pics tomorrow. The basic idea is a double walled chimney and the chaff ends up in the space between the two walls. After the roast is done you just tip the lot into the compost bin. It works like a Japanese clockwork (to my surprise).

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    OGs family is from Kaikoura, where the family home is, and he grew up in Blenheim as his father works for the railways.

    I love the place.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Pictures of the chimney would be great.

    Sounds a little like something else weve seen but intriguingly different.

    I suppose if you needed to cool any faster you could just put the skillet outside the door. *;D

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Quote Originally Posted by Ilan link=1174699442/0#14 date=1175904305
    Keeping the skillet in the fridge, or even the freezer for a few minutes will, no doubt, improve its performance, not only because of the lower metal temperature but also the thin layer of condensed moisture on the surface which will evaporate while sucking even more heat from its immediate surroundings.
    You might want to avoid keeping the pan in the fridge or freezer as the condensation on it will be absorbed by the beans as they are extremly hygroscopic straight out of the roaster.


    Java "Keep your beans dry" phile

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Here are the pics of the said chimney. Sizes are fairly arbitrary; for the outer shell I utilised *a disused flour sifter and for the inner * I slaughtered a cookie tin and bent and riveted the sheet metal to fit the machine opening. The lid (should be a tight fit) is made of an empty tin of stuffed vine leaves. The copper wires around it are of no significance, part of R&D of the product. The only critical consideration is the location of the vent holes; they must be below the upper edge of the inner chimney. These should be *punched from the inside so the inner surface stays smooth and allows for easy sliding of *chaff downward. *The vent holes better be as small as possible so *particles of chaff cant escape (1-2 mm), and the number of holes (overall area) will have an affect on the temperature inside. One obvious disadvantage of this contraption is the inability to see the beans, so I judge progress by sound and smoke; the results Im getting are pretty consistent so unless there is a significant change in the ambient temperature you can go by time. I hope the pics are self explanatory but am happy to provide more details if necessary. (I may have to post the pics individually, my apologies)
    Cheers

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Chimney pic 2


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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Chimney pic3


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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Chimney pic #4


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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Brilliant Ilan.

    Noticing the inner chimney tin and mention of the vine leaves (dolmades) tin has me wondering about your heritage.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Thanks for the compliment TG.
    As far as my heritage goes, I come from a place where the sea water is warm and the beach sand is silky white, where the eggplants are big and the ouzos and araks are long; Im a Mediterranean bunny.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Thought so.
    Same here.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Hi can you show a photo od what that tincan on top of the roaster is supposed to look like? ie what you exactly mean by slicing up the end to fit. And as for the other end is that sealed or do you rely on the plastic dooflicky to contain the roasting beans? THanks Assabal

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Get a tin with a pull ring for the lid. Use a can opener to cut the bottom off of the tin. Use your kitchen shears to cut a slit about halfway up the side of the tin from the bottom. (BE VERY CAREFUL HERE) -> Gently squeeze the bottom of the tin so that it overlaps, and insert into the popper chamber. Usually there is a screw head just inside the chamber, dont need to go further than that.

    The plastic bit that came with the popper is stored in the closet to be forgotten at a later date. You really only need the scoop.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    I leave the plastic dooflicky on to give the tin a little bit more stability. Will take a pic to show you what I mean when I can.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    picked up a crazy popper today, doesnt do half bad as a popcorn popper too, weird huh!Something else I get to modify muaahahahahaha!!!!
    Eagerly awaiting my starter pack from Mr Posty :))

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Hey guys. One thing that could be added to the guide is some methods to slow/ speed up roasts. The first time I roasted beans (ahhh, those were the days *::)... *;D) I was roasting indoors with a 1200W popper in a hot, Brisbane summer. The batch reached rolling second crack at about 5 minutes, wayyy to fast. And then you have people in cooler climates who have to deal with the reverse, roasts taking too long to get to 2nd crack.

    Also a major problem with my virgin roast session was that it filled the house with intense coffee smells that lingered for days, resulting in me being BANNED *;D from roasting coffee indoors! So before anything else, the first thing that MUST be added to the guide is that it is strongly recommended to roast outdoors (which also instantly solves the chaff disposal problem) unless you are willing to get some sort of venting system going, which some CS’s have done. *

    The off-kilter roast time can be quite disconcerting to the newbie roaster. Here are some methods:

    To slow the roast, use:
    -Extension cords (which are usually needed to roast outdoors anyway)
    -Double adapters, and have two poppers going on the same outlet
    -Fewer beans in the batch

    To speed up the roast, use:
    -A semi-covered lid ontop of the popper that traps heat inside the popper (make sure to use something like a thick piece of wood so it doesn’t burn, and don’t completely cover the popper or it will probably bust up)
    -More beans in the batch (if your popper has trouble with large batches, stir the beans with a wooden spoon for the first part of the roast until the beans “get going”)

    Also, I’ve found that different power outlets have a substantial effect on the roast speed.

    Preheating the popper is also a good idea, letting it run for a minute before the first batch. I find that that if I don’t do this the first batch tends to be a bit slower than subsequent ones.

    …It’s important that the newbie roasters have good first experiences ;). As they say, "you always remember the first time" ;D.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Hi all
    Attached is a Mark 2 of the roaster I posted earlier on on this thread. The improvements are: a "window" to view the roasting beans through a tempered glass bowl on top the chimney (need a torch to be able to see down the hole), a thermocouple thermometer (self explanatory) and a diversion tube to feed some of the hot air from the exhaust back into the air inlet of the popper. This is necessary in the 230V and cold environment we have down here (NZ S.I.).
    As an indoor unit this set up works well even though I havent mastered yet the use of the auxiliary warm air feed. I think with a bit of practice it should allow to actually profile a roast to some degree.
    Additional expenses were negligible, glass bowl $3.- at Briscoes, a thermometer $15.- on Trademe, a thermocouple $5.-.
    The most expensive item would be a strong torch.

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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Hey thats awesome!

    Very neat chaff collector for the popper....genius. Ive seen other popper chaff collectors...but nothing as neat and professional looking as yours.

    Good Work.

  37. #37
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Cheers mate, you made my day.

  38. #38
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    Cold weather Popper Roasting.

    I know that is now getting towards the end of winter and possibly not a lot of help to some of us, but I have been doing a bit of experimentation over the winter months and these are the things I have found. *I live in the Adelaide hills and found that in the winter it is just not warm enough to get a decent roast. Basically it was difficult to get the popper to get to a a high temp and keep it there. I hope this helps those of you who are still getting the cooler weather or just live in the colder bits of Australia.

    I started out by putting the popper in a cardboard box, although this made a difference, it was not that successful. Then I read somebodys report on here that they tried covering the box which increased the temp to burning the beans very quickly. *

    As Ambient temperature is one of the major influences on roasting times in the summer I started the dangerous process of thinking (it hurt *;D )

    One thing I noticed about box roasting was that the second roast was always much better, although a little faster, and there was up to 10C per minute difference in temperature. I found the popper was able to stay at and achieve higher temperatures much easier than the first box roast or when out of the box.

    My first experiment was to cover the top of the box for a little time which recycled warm air through the box and subsequently through the air intakes of the popper. It did a great job BUT it really was hard to judge when to take the cover off and made the roast too fast, resulting in almost burning the beans. One day I accidently tipped the popper over into the box after emptying the beans into the colander. I left it like that and gave it its cooling off period and then proceeded with my second and third roasts and they were perfect. *

    Once again I indulged in the painful art of thinking and tried the following:

    Before starting my first roast I place the popper in the box (no beans), covered it and let it run for 20 seconds to pre-warm the box.

    I then left the popper off to cool a little with the cover still on. I proceeded to doing my first roast (cover off) and it was much better there was a vast improvement and I found the roast was more stable. Leaving the cover off also allowed a little cool air into the box to counterract the intakes sucking in too much hot air thus preventing overheating and burning the roast.

    Second and subsequent roasts were also along the same parameters as the first roast.

    In a nutshell this is what I have been doing over the last few weeks.

    My popper is an 1100watt cascade popper from the warehouse - you may need to adjust this depending on the wattage on your popper (1200 watt poppers run a bit hotter).


    • Place popper in a box (mine measures 30cmL x 30cmW x 40cmD approx)

    • turn the popper on and cover the top o the box. Leave to run 20 secs

    • Turn off popper and allow to cool for 1 -2 minutes still covered

    • Add beans and proceed with your roast leaving the box uncovered.

    * If doing two or more roasts, after tipping the beans into the colander ,put the warm popper in the box to cool down for a few minutes. This keeps the box warm enough to keep the roasts stable, and still enables the popper to cool down enough to do a few roasts without the heat sensor to cut in and stop the roast.




  39. #39
    Senior Member tasadam's Avatar
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    I used to be a popper but now Im Corretto (BM, HG)
    Is there a thread in this forum that anyone can direct me to, that gives this much detail all in one place, on how to do it "Corretto"?
    I have found plenty of info from a heap of different threads, but nothing all in the one place like this thread...

  40. #40
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Scan through this for a bit of initial insight tasadam ...

    http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1154442377/0#0

    Worth the read, I reckon!


  41. #41
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Tas - give me time to get the hang of using my new coretto and I will write one. It is coming, but I havent been using the coretto long enough to write one.

  42. #42
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Yep, thats a good link Tony and also why its been made Sticky ;).....

    I dont know that we need another How To Corretto" thread as such, maybe if Belinda is reading this thread she might like to revisit the original and condense all the info in it down to something that approaches more of a "How To". Thanks for the offer though Cindy.... :)

    Mal.

  43. #43
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Hi

    All very interesting.

    I have ordered a starter pack and a DMM Temperature Data Logger and will go and buy a popcorn maker - thinking the Breville crazy popper. Any other suggestions?

    No where on this thread (unless I am missing it) does it describe where you actually put the temperature probe into the popcorn maker.

    As I have never really looked at a popcorn maker, I have no idea, but may figure it out. Any suggestions on attaching it / tips for holding it in place? Pics would be good.

    This might make sense when I have all the equipment - I cannot wait.

    Rgds
    Ben

  44. #44
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    The Warehouse has a very good popper (and cheaper) for roasting. It can only roast up to 100g max but works very well.

    I used to feed my temperature probe down through the chimney and try to get it to fit in the centre of the beans. I them placed the plastic cuff from the popper over it and this held everything in place. Its just a matter of fiddling a bit.

  45. #45
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Does using a popper to roast coffee render it pretty much useless for popcorn (IE is it tainted with coffee)?

    Thanks

    Sen

  46. #46
    Senior Member Dennis's Avatar
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Quote Originally Posted by Senator link=1174699442/30#44 date=1205383235
    Does using a popper to roast coffee render it pretty much useless for popcorn (IE is it tainted with coffee)?

    Thanks

    Sen
    Coffee doesnt taint things...surely coffee-flavoured pop corn is the next big thing! ;D

  47. #47
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Its more for the kids and the potential WAF.

    If I kill the popper, Id be in deep doo doo, if it can survive, so might I

  48. #48
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    I killed my daughters B&D popper from trying to do 5 roasts in a row, I had to give her my Saeco Via Venezia when I upgraded to Silvia as a peace offering!!!

  49. #49
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Just got hooked on roasting with the popper 1st one lasted I got about 6 roast out off and the 2nd one about 10 before the blew. I bought it from the Warehouse. The 1st one seemed to have a fault with the switch and when the 2nd blew today it came from the switch area as well. It is not from overusing and I put very small amounts. Any suggestion I dont want to give up my popper career ? Are the Imex c100 any good in terms of longevity used with care?

  50. #50
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    Re: A beginners guide to Roasting using a popper

    Behmor Coffee Roaster
    carloz - are you from AU? Are you referring to the Warehouse in AU or NZ and do they sell the same poppers?

    I too am wanting to know which models are suitable as I have heard lots of reports about having to replace poppers regularly (from burning out) which doesnt really seem to make sound financial sense?

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