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Thread: New to Roasting and Blending

  1. #1
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    New to Roasting and Blending

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    So im relatively new to roasting and blending but i believe that the blend i make is pretty good although i am VERY keen to make it better. currently i am roasting 8 different single origin beans all of which are fair trade organic. they include Mexico, Colombia, Indonesia, Dominican Republic, Honduras, Ethiopian, PNG and Peru.
    im putting different percentages of each into the blend but i am struggling with the tweaking of the flavors. As in it is not quite strong enough and doesnt have a strong body which is what im ultimately after.
    Currently the strong coffee in the blend is Ethiopian but i cannot put too much of it in the blend as it makes it too acidic.
    Im basically just looking for some help trying to understand what mix of flavors makes the best tasting blend overall and how to get a smooth and strong flavour. can anyone help?

  2. #2
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    Re: New to Roasting and Blending

    Of so from reading some of the posts here it is clear i am using way too many beans in my blend. Fair enough. Therefore the blend i propse to use for a strong sweet flavour is:
    40% Ethiopia Yirgacheffe (Strong, Sweet earthy flavour. dark roast)
    30% PNG Purosa (Smooth sweet flavour with slight nut. Perfect medium roast)
    20% Colombia Equidad (Sweet, acidic flavour with slight clove (i think). Medium roast)
    10% Dominican Republic Barahona (Strong Earthy acidic flavour. Slight dark roast)
    Thoughts?

  3. #3
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    Re: New to Roasting and Blending

    Welcome Ben.

    Its important first of all, to understand the individual characteristics of each single origin and how different roast profiles affect it in the cup. You should aim to roast all them in a way that makes them drinkable as a SO.

    Once youve done this, you can blend with a plan in mind. The best advice early on is to keep it simple. 2 or 3 bean blends are easier to adjust and with blends of 4 beans or more you really need to know what youre doing (or get very lucky :))

    Have you tried the classic Moca Java blend? 50/50 of Indo/Ethiopian should do the trick. Of course, it will depend upon which Indo/Ethiopian and how you roast them.

    Check out the "blending basics" sticky in this section of the forum.
    SweetMarias and Boot coffee also have good info.

    good luck,

    sd

  4. #4
    Senior Member Luke_G's Avatar
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    Re: New to Roasting and Blending

    Quote Originally Posted by 7D7A71757E72767173322E2D2C1F0 link=1272331106/1#1 date=1272334367
    so from reading some of the posts here it is clear i am using way too many beans in my blend. Fair enough. Therefore the blend i propse to use for a strong sweet flavour is:
    40% Ethiopia Yirgacheffe (Strong, Sweet earthy flavour. dark roast)
    30% PNG Purosa (Smooth sweet flavour with slight nut. Perfect medium roast)
    20% Colombia Equidad (Sweet, acidic flavour with slight clove (i think). Medium roast)
    10% Dominican Republic Barahona (Strong Earthy acidic flavour. Slight dark roast)
    Thoughts?
    OK.. my thoughts...

    Leave the Dominican coffee for single origin...
    Add an extra 10% Columbian and roast it a little bit darker.

    This by my experience should give you the extra body you require and the slightly longer roasting of the Columbian should transfer to a bit "stronger".

    ALTERNATIVE:
    Swap the Dominican for some dark roasted Indonesian like a Mao Horse or Blue Batak?
    This will also give the boost you looking for?

    ANOTHER ALTERNATIVE:
    If you like it the way it is but just need some extra oomph... once blended add some dark roasted Robusta to the end product...somewhere between 5% and 15%. Start low and experiment to find out where the robusta takes over the Arabica flavours and aromas then settle on a safe %.

    TIP:
    Roast the robusta at least 5 days ahead of the rest and anywhere up to 10 days ahead of the others.

    It looks a bit like your using 2 base beans in the Columbian and the PNG...something else to try would be using the same beans but just one base? .. OR different %s of each?

    Good luck and let us know how you go with it?
    Luke.

  5. #5
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: New to Roasting and Blending

    Quote Originally Posted by 625B454B71692E0 link=1272331106/3#3 date=1272352661
    ALTERNATIVE:
    Swap the Dominican for some dark roasted Indonesian like a Mao Horse or Blue Batak?
    This will also give the boost you looking for?
    I think youll find that this is of Ethiopian origin CD.... ;)

    Mal.

  6. #6
    Wine_of_the_Bean
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    Re: New to Roasting and Blending

    Or a slight twist on the mocha java...


    50% Indo (CS 11)
    30% Ethiopian (CS 9)
    20% Indo (CS 8)

  7. #7
    Senior Member Luke_G's Avatar
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    Re: New to Roasting and Blending

    Quote Originally Posted by 0825212D204C0 link=1272331106/4#4 date=1272365420
    I think youll find that this is of Ethiopian origin CD.
    Hahahahahahahah...blonde moment!

    I just pictured the not so blue horse on a Kuda Mas bag :D

    Thanks for pointing that out for us all ::)

  8. #8
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    Re: New to Roasting and Blending

    Agree completely with what smokeydeck said - roast them all separately such that they work well as a single origin, then cup them (ie. taste them away from the espresso machine) to see what they have to offer. Every bean will be different (even more so depending on how you roast them and then your taste preferences etc.) and not all will play nicely with the others.

    My understanding of what people perceive as "strength" is what others call a beans ability to "cut through milk". For me its neither acidity OR dark roast characteristics that give blends this trait, its some other x-factor which I dont have a name for... I do know that harder beans (Kenya, many Centrals, Ethiopians) roasted a bit darker have this characteristic. Sumatrans do it well, too, but Im personally not a fan of them unless you can get a nice clean one that lacks that gritty, savoury harshness.

    Cheers,
    Stuart.

  9. #9
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    Re: New to Roasting and Blending

    I havent started roasting yet... maybe sometime this weekend. But Ive read that you should only blend 2-3 varietals. One is always the blend base and the other 1 or 2 complement, based on the taste you are looking for.*Blend before roasting to keep roast level consistent. Blend after if you want each varietal to have its own roast level as well as if you want to determine the percentage of each blend based on weight. Another option is to blend the same varietal that has been roasted using different roast levels. I plan on experimenting doing both... once I get around to it. :)



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