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Thread: Closest Beanbay equivalent to these?

  1. #1
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Closest Beanbay equivalent to these?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Wondering what the closest (if any) Beanbay equivalent green beans might be to some commercial roasted beans we've been using. Any help will be much appreciated.

    The beans as described by the seller as :

    Dark Mocha High roast. Java blend, very strong, high caffeine content.


    Kenya From High Country, over 4,000 feet. It has a high acidity and a typical sweet nutty flavour. Light roast, low in caffeine.



    Dark Maragogype Large beans, sometimes quite difficult to obtain. From Central America origins, it has a wonderful flowery fragrance with a delicate sweet cup. Good quality and low acidity, very handsome when roasted light or dark. Continually regarded as one of the best coffees. Extremely smooth.

  2. #2
    KJM
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    Quote Originally Posted by CafeLotta View Post
    Wondering what the closest (if any) Beanbay equivalent green beans might be to some commercial roasted beans we've been using. Any help will be much appreciated.

    The beans as described by the seller as :

    Dark Mocha High roast. Java blend, very strong, high caffeine content.


    Kenya From High Country, over 4,000 feet. It has a high acidity and a typical sweet nutty flavour. Light roast, low in caffeine.



    Dark Maragogype Large beans, sometimes quite difficult to obtain. From Central America origins, it has a wonderful flowery fragrance with a delicate sweet cup. Good quality and low acidity, very handsome when roasted light or dark. Continually regarded as one of the best coffees. Extremely smooth.
    I'm not an expert - by any measure - but my $0.02 on this would be:

    "Dark Mocha" - try a 50/50 blend of the Sulawesi Blue and the Ethiopian Ghimbi. (I have a personal bias to this Ethiopian - others might be just as good )
    "Kenya" - well, there is only one Kenyan in BeanBay But I've not found "nutty" in it (particularly). Tends to be fruity acidity.

    As for the Maragogype - not my favourite style but the Peruvian Ceja de Selva would be close - smooth. good mouthfeel and just plain nice.

    But you could move any of these beans a bit on the flavour wheel by changing roast depth. So you have a bit of a journey on your hands trying to reproduce the profile you're chasing! Best of luck!

    Cheers
    /Kevin

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    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KJM View Post
    I'm not an expert - by any measure - but my $0.02 on this would be:

    "Dark Mocha" - try a 50/50 blend of the Sulawesi Blue and the Ethiopian Ghimbi. (I have a personal bias to this Ethiopian - others might be just as good )
    "Kenya" - well, there is only one Kenyan in BeanBay But I've not found "nutty" in it (particularly). Tends to be fruity acidity.

    As for the Maragogype - not my favourite style but the Peruvian Ceja de Selva would be close - smooth. good mouthfeel and just plain nice.

    But you could move any of these beans a bit on the flavour wheel by changing roast depth. So you have a bit of a journey on your hands trying to reproduce the profile you're chasing! Best of luck!

    Cheers
    /Kevin
    Thanks for your input. Yes I guess it is a bit of an ambitious challenge but always good to have a starting point. Who knows where we'll end up!

    I don't imagine I'll replicate the commercial blends previously used but I was very disappointed with the current batch of one blend that was chaff filled, smokey and under-roasted. Not at all like the previous batches purchased of the same blend. At the premium price charged I didn't feel it was acceptable at all.

    The Corretto set-up should be up and ready soon so we'll let the chaff fly and experiment a bit.

  4. #4
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    I agree with KJM's comments. The Moch-Java blend was originally made of Yemen and Javanese beans. Mocha was the port in Yemen where the whole coffee trade originated but Yemeni beans originated in Ethiopia. Java became the other big coffee exporting region not long after. These days, Mocha Java is considered any blend of Indonesian and Northern African beans but who knows what beans the seller is offering.
    If you want to produce an authentic Mocha Java blend, the Ethiopian Gambella is sometimes referred to as the poor man's Yemen so it may be closest to current Yemen beans. The Sulawesi Blue, Sumatran and Flores are the only beans from the 'Java' region currently in BeanBay.

    A good quality Kenyan deserves to be roasted lightly and prepared via a manual brewing method (filter, plunger, syphon). I haven't enjoyed them as milk-based espresso style.

    There are no maragogype beans in BeanBay. The closest would perhaps be the Mexican which is a typica variety (maragogype is considered a mutation of typica) but taste- and size-wise, quite different.

    Any reason you need to try to reproduce these? You probably won't, as a corretto won't produce the same results as the commercial roaster the seller presumably uses.

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    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flynnaus View Post
    Any reason you need to try to reproduce these? You probably won't, as a corretto won't produce the same results as the commercial roaster the seller presumably uses.
    Probably as a starting point due to what we found to be our favorites from that particular sellers range after trying quite a few of those on offer.

    As previously mentioned, one of the 2 blends in the last lot was pretty ordinary. I figured I couldn't do too much worse with the amount of chaff and excessive smokiness.

    There are so many variables at play with both roasting and brewing, I'm hoping at the end of the day a balance will be found that is palatable at half the price.

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    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    Hmmm...

    Dark Mocha - Indo beans (no mention of Mocha, just Java in the description) sounds like it's got at least some robusta in it.
    Kenya - Nutty? Under roasted.
    Dark Maragogype - I doubt at a dark roast these would fit their description "wonderful flowery fragrance with a delicate sweet cup"

    Those descriptions sound like plagiarised marketing spin, not a real humans thoughts of what they found after trying those actual coffees.

    You cannot recreate a blend that you have only read about, if you really want to recreate one of them then send me 100g of it and I'll tell you which direction you should head to recreate a similar style.

    I actually think you would be better off just giving the roasting a go with 2.5kg of Peru Ceja. Do plenty of small roasts changing one variable at a time and keep plenty of notes. You will learn what you like and what you don't like in the roasting profile and can then build on your skills with other single origin beans until you create the perfect blend for your tastes.

    That's the reason to home roast, it's a learning journey that should result in you having a coffee that perfectly suits you.

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    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    Hmmm...

    Dark Mocha - Indo beans (no mention of Mocha, just Java in the description) sounds like it's got at least some robusta in it.
    Kenya - Nutty? Under roasted.
    Dark Maragogype - I doubt at a dark roast these would fit their description "wonderful flowery fragrance with a delicate sweet cup"

    Those descriptions sound like plagiarised marketing spin, not a real humans thoughts of what they found after trying those actual coffees.

    You cannot recreate a blend that you have only read about, if you really want to recreate one of them then send me 100g of it and I'll tell you which direction you should head to recreate a similar style.

    I actually think you would be better off just giving the roasting a go with 2.5kg of Peru Ceja. Do plenty of small roasts changing one variable at a time and keep plenty of notes. You will learn what you like and what you don't like in the roasting profile and can then build on your skills with other single origin beans until you create the perfect blend for your tastes.

    That's the reason to home roast, it's a learning journey that should result in you having a coffee that perfectly suits you.

    The descriptions were taken from those supplied online by the retailer from who we bought and picked-up our fresh roasted bean blends up until now.
    Descriptions were supplied innocently in the hope they meant something to those in the "know" as I wouldn't even attempt to describe them myself.

    I didn't want to identify the retailer by name on the forum as it doesn't seem to be the thing to do.

    We bought 2 blends that we liked after trying a few others they also have for sale.

    The first blend we buy is a Kenya/Dark Mocha blend. This has a mix of dark roasted and medium roasted beans in it.
    The other a Kenya/Maragogype blend as best we can make out. All beans are a similar color being a medium roast or close to.
    Maragogype mustn't be the same one as sold seperately as they definetly aren't dark roasted.

    As is obvious, this is all new to us so wishful thinking was we might get in the ballpark of what we preferred rather than heading down the wrong road.

    I appreciate your suggestion of the Peru Ceja and will start from there before getting too excited with trying to blend.

    The Kenya/Maragogype from the current batch we have isn't the same as we bought from the retailer previously. I'm not sure that sending a sample of this is indicitive of what we are after. It is a lighter roast and leaves much more chaff residue in the grinder than the previous lot which was the one we were quite keen on.
    If I can source the same blend we had previously then I will take you up on the offer of sending some through if that's okay.



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