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Thread: Cuban beans

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    Cuban beans

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Anyone tried Cuban as a base bean for a blend - any thoughts on what else to inspire the blend

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    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Depends how you are going to brew the resulting coffee. The Cuban works well for me when blended with either the Guatemala Huehue or Jac, but I drink this largely in the Aeropress (and with a slightly lighter roast). I've tried it in some of my espresso blends but am reticent to draw a conclusion.....I changed more than one thing at a time.

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    thanks Barry - will be extracting coffee in espresso machine .. Will try blend with Guatemala in a light roast

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    btw is that a play REO Speedwagon good tunes

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    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    I wouldn't be quite so keen on the light roast when roasting for espresso, and yeh, if you blow up my avatar there is in fact a picture of the original REO Speedwagon (vehicle). I obtained my moniker during a misheard conversation regarding the current premier of NSW and 70s/80s soft rock (can't remember much else).

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    Senior Member Mariner's Avatar
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    I always wondered.......

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    Senior Member Mariner's Avatar
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    Also, always wondered, of late, about the cuban beans.....might have to try them. Are they good as SO or better as a blend....or both?

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    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Fine both ways Mariner. I first roasted a batch as a SO, intending to use in Aeropress but let the roast go on a bit longer than intended, so largely used it in the Diadema. Made quite interesting flat whites, with a fairly fine grind. Not at the chocolatey end of tastes, so that's worth considering if you like chocolate/cocoa when blending.

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    There's a coffee shop in newcastle called "the social" pretty cool place with lever groups set above the counter like beer taps with the boiler below. A very clean look... but back on topic they only serve a cuban blend a really nice spicy dry coffee.
    So I bought the Cuban from beanbay and the beans are fantastic! Definitely worth trying it's instantly one of my favorite SO's. Subtle and spicy... and almost a red wine tannin drying feeling. I've blended with a PNG with success so maybe try any indo or java bean in a blend? Just my thoughts though.

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    Most of cuban coffee i know are wet processed or washed resulting in cleaner cup smooth but what it is lacking is the body is quite thin. Cuban can be enjoyed fully when blended with a little robusta or with beans with more intense type such as high altitude variants.

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    Senior Member Vinitasse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahhhespressso View Post
    Most of cuban coffee i know are wet processed or washed resulting in cleaner cup smooth but what it is lacking is the body is quite thin. Cuban can be enjoyed fully when blended with a little robusta or with beans with more intense type such as high altitude variants.
    Not quite sure what you're on about... in my experience Cuban coffees are VERY rich and full bodied (when roasted properly) and are best enjoyed as a Single Origin where their luscious chocolate notes and hints of fresh tobacco really get to shine. As for altitude, most of Cuba's export coffees come from the Sierra Maestre mountains and are grown at reasonably high altitude as it is. The only thing lacking, in terms of balance, is acidity but this only adds to the silky softness and richness and is no bad thing.

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    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Vinitasse, do you reckon there's an element of the subconscious affecting taste sensations with respect to the Cuban beans - tobacco thing (serious question)? Or is there some reason good reason (or just pot luck) that the land of fine cigars produces coffee with hints of tobacco?

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    Senior Member Vinitasse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    Vinitasse, do you reckon there's an element of the subconscious affecting taste sensations with respect to the Cuban beans - tobacco thing (serious question)? Or is there some reason good reason (or just pot luck) that the land of fine cigars produces coffee with hints of tobacco?
    In a blind tasting I still would have spotted the tobacco leaf notes, in the same way that I also spot tobacco leaf aromas in a Paringa Estate Single Vineyard "The Paringa" Pinot Noir (and that certainly ain't from Cuba). Not quite sure why it's there... perhaps the beans are stored in a warehouse alongside freshly harvested tobacco... who knows... but it's there.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinitasse View Post
    In a blind tasting I still would have spotted the tobacco leaf notes, in the same way that I also spot tobacco leaf aromas in a Paringa Estate Single Vineyard "The Paringa" Pinot Noir (and that certainly ain't from Cuba). Not quite sure why it's there... perhaps the beans are stored in a warehouse alongside freshly harvested tobacco... who knows... but it's there.
    Fair enough. I guess my Indian Elephant Hills beans don't exactly taste like Dahl Makhani, no matter how many tricks my mind plays.

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    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    Vinitasse, do you reckon there's an element of the subconscious affecting taste sensations with respect to the Cuban beans - tobacco thing (serious question)? Or is there some reason good reason (or just pot luck) that the land of fine cigars produces coffee with hints of tobacco?
    Not for me. See this thread. Other roasts were better but I ended up blending with it as I didn't really enjoy it as a Single Origin.

    Perhaps it is something to do with the terroir nature of coffee growing, especially if Nicotiana is grown among the coffee trees or vice versa.

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    Senior Member mwcalder05's Avatar
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    I can't really see how a Cuban can fit in a blend because it's so unique! Our one at work has gotten some really nice smooth smokey, tobacco and cocoa notes and I don't see why you would want to put other things with it!
    Dimal and Vinitasse like this.

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    It all comes to the taste not because some people dont agree then the rest of coffee lovers community shouldnt or cant experiment. Cuban does not have body as rich as others. Even compared to kenya, it is not. In general i like my cuban in an espresso cup, stand alone, with sugar but thats me, with milk i enjoy it mixed with the kenyan AB or evn AA. It adds to the body but thats my opinion. Others may or may not agree. My friend at coficom (coffee importer) told me it has medium body, but again thats his and his company opinion based on their cupping score. Coffee in kenya is grown around at 2 to 3 thousands meter elevation plateau at mt kenya that is very high compared to cubam sierra maestra, thats why i said it is considered lower altitude hence the low acidity flavour in it. But who knows ive never been there nor measured the mountain myself. So i might be wrong, maybe some ppl are more expert. Just loving my cup and sharing my own experience to other coffee lovers here. Cheers

  18. #18
    Senior Member Vinitasse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahhhespressso View Post
    It all comes to the taste not because some people dont agree then the rest of coffee lovers community shouldnt or cant experiment. Cuban does not have body as rich as others. Even compared to kenya, it is not. In general i like my cuban in an espresso cup, stand alone, with sugar but thats me, with milk i enjoy it mixed with the kenyan AB or evn AA. It adds to the body but thats my opinion. Others may or may not agree. My friend at coficom (coffee importer) told me it has medium body, but again thats his and his company opinion based on their cupping score. Coffee in kenya is grown around at 2 to 3 thousands meter elevation plateau at mt kenya that is very high compared to cubam sierra maestra, thats why i said it is considered lower altitude hence the low acidity flavour in it. But who knows ive never been there nor measured the mountain myself. So i might be wrong, maybe some ppl are more expert. Just loving my cup and sharing my own experience to other coffee lovers here. Cheers
    The highest quality Very High Altitude coffees in Kenyan are, in fact, grown between 1300-1800m altitude, with the majority of Kenyan beans being grown between 1000-1300m. The highest quality Seranno coffee in Cuba is grown at 1000m of altitude and, in my opinion, yields wonderfully rich and full-bodied coffee... if properly roasted.



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