Results 1 to 6 of 6
Like Tree3Likes
  • 2 Post By Dimal
  • 1 Post By BoxBrownie

Thread: (nearly) Indestructible Moka Pot Blend

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Toowoomba, Queensland
    Posts
    26

    (nearly) Indestructible Moka Pot Blend

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    A (nearly) Indestructible Moka Pot Blend is what I'm trying to make.

    At the moment I have a simple blend just for Moka pot brewing (mostly when camping) I'm quite happy with for myself at the moment:

    70% Brasil Pulped Natural (BeanBay)
    15% El Salvador El Boqueron Coop (BeanBay)
    15% PNG Washed Robusta
    All roasted a little into second crack

    But I'm wondering if there are any adjustments I might make that might help it stand up a bit better against Moka pot misuse, here's why.
    I have 2 friends that use Mokas as their only fresh coffee brew method but they both persist in leaving their pots on the stove to bubble away for ages (guess they just like the sound). I've wanted to make them gifts of my Moka blend but I know they are unlikely to change their habits (when I'm not watching over them and waving my hands in the air).
    Any ideas for a blend/roast style that will stand up to a bit of abuse? I'm obviously not looking for subtle flavours here, just good fresh coffee (that's probably gonna get burnt)?

  2. #2
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    16,760
    G'day "BoxBrownie"...

    If I was blending those particular beans, I'd probably opt for the following, as a starting point...
    50% Brasil Pulped Natural (BeanBay)
    40% El Salvador El Boqueron Coop (BeanBay)
    10% PNG Washed Robusta

    I'd only take the Robusta into 2nd-Crack but stop it just as the Roll kicks in. The other two, I'd stop before 2nd-Crack starts, say at 221-223deg.C.

    Given that the Brazilian and El Salvador beans are so different, I would advise roasting these separately too - The El Sal beans are quite a lot denser than the Brazilians, so the profiles are not really mutually compatible, to get the best out of each variety. Post blend after roasting (give 'em a really good mixing), bag up and leave for about a week before cracking the bag open.
    If you were a real purist, you would roast the El Sal and Robusta beans about a week before the Brazilians Bag them up separately; then blend, bag-up with the Brazilians and open after about another 3-5 days.

    How far you want to go with it depends on your coffee geekiness I s'pose but that's what I would do anyway...

    Mal.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Toowoomba, Queensland
    Posts
    26
    Hello Mal,
    Yes I realize I should be roasting separately, just got into the habit of pre-blending as it still tastes pretty good.
    I think I will closely follow your suggestions for my next batch.
    What would be the reason for roasting the Brasilians a week later and also the adjustment to 50%?
    I've been roasting for nearly a year now and with a temperature probe for a good few months.
    The quality of my roasts is going up (I'm at about roast number 140 now) and I do kinda of feel I should be getting a bit more precise about things now instead of flinging stuff in altogether and hoping for a good result so your suggestions have given me something to think about.
    Steve

  4. #4
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    16,760
    Quote Originally Posted by BoxBrownie View Post
    Hello Mal,
    Yes I realize I should be roasting separately, just got into the habit of pre-blending as it still tastes pretty good.
    G'day Steve...

    That's what important of course and I do the same thing sometimes if I've managed to run short and need a new batch in a hurry...

    Quote Originally Posted by BoxBrownie View Post
    What would be the reason for roasting the Brasilians a week later and also the adjustment to 50%?
    I've been roasting for nearly a year now and with a temperature probe for a good few months.
    It's mostly about trying to get the peak flavour of the individual beans, in the blend, to come together at about the same time. This is especially true for any Robusta you add in to a blend. It just takes a lot longer than most Arabica beans to get there.

    Quote Originally Posted by BoxBrownie View Post
    The quality of my roasts is going up (I'm at about roast number 140 now) and I do kinda of feel I should be getting a bit more precise about things now instead of flinging stuff in altogether and hoping for a good result so your suggestions have given me something to think about.
    Steve
    No worries Steve. It's really all about experimenting with your own particular setup so that you can squeeze the best out of the beans in each batch. How far each person wants to go with this is a very individual thing of course, but for me, it is worth it...

    I think it's more about enjoying the whole process and the bit at the end where you get to sample the fruits of your labours, in the cup, is the the cherry on the cake and the ultimate reward for when everything comes together...

    Mal.
    chokkidog and smokey like this.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Toowoomba, Queensland
    Posts
    26
    Well here I am and I've roasted my beans separately and post blended and yes my blend is quite significantly better. It looks great, very evenly roasted. I'd have to say that unless I'm really desperate I'll probably not preblend again, it's that much better.
    Dimal likes this.

  6. #6
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    16,760
    Excellent news "BeanBay"...

    Preblended roast batches shouldn't be written off completely though. Beans with similar size and density can be preblended very successfully. It's just a matter of researching the beans beforehand to decide what will work and which beans should be post-blended. All part of the fun...

    Robusta is the exception to this though, as pretty well all of them require a higher final roasting temperature and a longer flavour development period.

    Mal.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •