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Thread: Help me Blend, I have some Green Beans at Home

  1. #1
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    Help me Blend, I have some Green Beans at Home

    Hi I have been roasting single origin beans for a while and would like to start blending but would like some guidence.
    I have the following green beans below if anyone could reconmend a blend if possible. I roast on a Behmor 1600+.
    Also would you roast to 2nd crack etc for each bean. Anyhelp would be much appreciated.

    - Brazil yellow bourbon Especial
    - Columbian volcan galeras supremo
    - Robusta India Mugundi Sundried
    - Ethiopia Biftu Gesha Sundried

    Kind Regards
    Michael

  2. #2
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    I'd say both the brazil and columbian would be good bases, you could try maybe 50/50 to 70/30 either of them and the ethiopia at first to keep it simple. Then you could throw in a small amount (maybe 10%?) of the robusta. Then you could go crazy and try all 4, maybe 30/30/10/30 in the order you have them.

    If for espresso I'd probably take close to or just at second crack (not sure about the robusta, maybe that needs even more)

  3. #3
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
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    Columbian 70%, Biftu Gesha 30% would be a super tasty blend!!!
    Dimal and chokkidog like this.

  4. #4
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    Hi, Thanks for the feedback, I assume to roast each bean individually as seperate times to reach cracks?

  5. #5
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    I roast beans that have been pre-blended. It’s a time thing for me, but it’s also a hit of an adventure. The beans won’t reach 1st crack all at the same time, so I try and adjust the roast variables to avoid too much disparity.

  6. #6
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    This will is all good help. Thank you. Will have some fun over the weekend with a couple roasts (blends) and see how i go.

  7. #7
    Senior Member chokkidog's Avatar
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    There is a substantial thread here https://coffeesnobs.com.au/blending-...use-blend.html on blending that is well worth the read. It has specifics and some valuable generalisations.
    Also this on Sweet Marias for a general blending guide. https://www.sweetmarias.com/blending.html
    When developing a blend, roasting origins individually is the best way to go, not for anything specifically about different first crack times but for the whole roast development time/ratio and end roast point.
    It allows you to experiment with multiple bean groups and blend ratios. Once you have a blend worked out, roast the component beans together in a pre-roast blend and see if it is the same. You may have to adjust
    development time ratios for this stage of creating a blend but don't give up after one roast; it may be only a matter of a few seconds either way.
    Add the Robusta at amounts of 10% but not exceeding 15%, below 10% may negate or diminish its contribution. None of my blends have Robusta.
    Dimal and 338 like this.

  8. #8
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    Hey Michael, I wouldn't profess to have as much knowledge as the other posters but my recommendations would be similar - use either the Brazilian or Colombian as a base, with 30-60% African thrown in. You could roast the three separately and blend after to work out what you like best. I would also suggest getting an Indo and Central American and see how they could fit in.

    I generally like my beans on the darkish side, around the beginning of second crack. I would often take the base bean a bit darker however, maybe into the beginning of rolling second crack. A bit of a generalisation, but I found that provided more body and oompf without compromising the flavours which are still present from the lighter portion of the roast. It would also give you an opportunity to co-roast some robusta. Unless you're roasting for friends I found it hard to justify whole batches of the stuff, and with the small bean size vs say, the Colombian, they should develop a bit faster on an aggressive roast profile (Robustas need higher temperatures, and *should* be roasted separately).

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