Results 1 to 33 of 33
Like Tree2Likes
  • 1 Post By fatboy_1999
  • 1 Post By CafeLotta

Thread: Which Sunbeam to buy?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    558

    Which Sunbeam to buy?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi all

    A friend of mine wants to buy a coffee machine for his mum for Mother's Day.

    I've talked him through all the different machine types, budgets, coffee preferences, user preferences, etc and where we've ended up is that I've recommended a cafe series or equivalent machine and a smart grinder or equivalent.

    But my problem is that I don't know the sunbeam range at all, it's been so long since I've had one.

    Is there a standout machine in the $300 range? Because it's a gift for his mum it's got to be new.

    Thanks
    Jonathon

  2. #2
    Senior Member fatboy_1999's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    2,116
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon View Post
    Hi all

    A friend of mine wants to buy a coffee machine for his mum for Mother's Day.

    I've talked him through all the different machine types, budgets, coffee preferences, user preferences, etc and where we've ended up is that I've recommended a cafe series or equivalent machine and a smart grinder or equivalent.

    But my problem is that I don't know the sunbeam range at all, it's been so long since I've had one.

    Is there a standout machine in the $300 range? Because it's a gift for his mum it's got to be new.

    Thanks
    Jonathon
    A Cafe Series coffee machine is around $800 (RRP).
    What is his budget all up?
    I doubt that he will want to shell out $200+ for a half decent grinder and then another 3 or 4 hundred on an appliance.
    And given your question about the $300 range, I'm equally sure he ain't gonna plump for the EM7000

    If it goes anything like the conversations I have with people when they ask what they should get, they listen intently to my advice, then go and buy a pod machine, then try to tell me how good it is after they have bought it. I call these people "Somebody that I used to know".

    I'm sure his Mum will love the pod machine that he ends up buying.

    Brett.
    Borgling likes this.

  3. #3
    Doppio Ristretto
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    NSW South Coast
    Posts
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by fatboy_1999 View Post
    A Cafe Series coffee machine is around $800 (RRP).
    What is his budget all up?
    I doubt that he will want to shell out $200+ for a half decent grinder and then another 3 or 4 hundred on an appliance.
    And given your question about the $300 range, I'm equally sure he ain't gonna plump for the EM7000

    If it goes anything like the conversations I have with people when they ask what they should get, they listen intently to my advice, then go and buy a pod machine, then try to tell me how good it is after they have bought it. I call these people "Somebody that I used to know".

    I'm sure his Mum will love the pod machine that he ends up buying.

    Brett.

    +1

    anyone who buys that stale ground coffee in an aluminium pod and believes it tastes good needs to be sent to the fires of Mordor.

    If your friend lives anywhere near Botany, then he can go to the sunbeam factory outlet and get a runout 6910 or a remanufactured em7K for about 300 less than RRP.

    but you have to be in the right place at the right time. they are not always in stock.

    best bit about the refurbed / remanufactured, is that they do it here in Oz and the machines are better than ex-china. and they have warranty as well.

    I bought brand new old stock 6910's for my sister and parents for xmas and paid half RRP. The em7K is a facelifted 6910 with shiny buttons and an extra temperature gauge for the steam wand, which is really just a wank.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    558
    He definitely doesn't want pod, apparently his mum is very keen to get a grinder, good on her!

    I've talked him up to a budget of about $700, so I'm now going to suggest a Silvia for $500 and a smart grinder for whatever they cost, about $200ish I think.

    I just need to talk him into upping his budget to $900, then he can get a Compak K3 to go with the Silvia!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    558
    Quote Originally Posted by fatboy_1999 View Post
    A Cafe Series coffee machine is around $800 (RRP).

    .
    Sorry, I was using the term 'cafe series' as a generic term to refer to the thermoblock machines they sell at Myer, DJs, etc. Not having looked at them in years I had no idea what their names and numbers are.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    21
    On the EM7000, Sunbeam are throwing in an EM0480 for free. But it's well above the budget.

    An Aeropress, a low end electric burr grinder and periodically supplying fresh roasted beans is a much better present for that budget. I got approximately that for my 70yo parents, and they use them daily.

  7. #7
    Doppio Ristretto
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    NSW South Coast
    Posts
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by lobstermash View Post
    On the EM7000, Sunbeam are throwing in an EM0480 for free. But it's well above the budget.

    An Aeropress, a low end electric burr grinder and periodically supplying fresh roasted beans is a much better present for that budget. I got approximately that for my 70yo parents, and they use them daily.
    Excellent suggestion.

    Aeropress and a breville smart grinder or even a K3 would be fantastic, unless they are determined to have frothy milk drinks

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    558
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeB View Post
    Excellent suggestion.

    Aeropress and a breville smart grinder or even a K3 would be fantastic, unless they are determined to have frothy milk drinks
    K3 for an aeropress? I've just bought a K3 for my giotto at home (already have a rocky) but I use a cheap breville grinder for my aeropress at work and it's perfectly adequate for the aeropress.

    In any case, my friend's mum wants lattes.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    21
    If the budget's been increased, there are still lots of places you can get an EM6910 for around $600 new. Likewise for a Silvia. Or the EM7000 with a free EM0480 for around $750 (David Jones)

  10. #10
    Senior Member Journeyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bendigo
    Posts
    1,028
    I'd be cautious about recommending a Silvia. It seems like an excellent machine but from the comments on here you'd want to be a dedicated coffee snob to get decent coffee from one. Giving one as a gift to an amateur is just going to add another item to eBay. Like giving a puppy, you want to make sure you aren't just handing over something that will be neglected because they never learn to look after it.

    The good thing about a 6910 (or 7000) is it is push-button simple to use. Cleaning is simple too, and all machines need to be clean so maybe once he buys and gifts you can go around and run a class on making coffee, foaming milk and cleaning routines?

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    558
    Quote Originally Posted by lobstermash View Post
    If the budget's been increased, there are still lots of places you can get an EM6910 for around $600 new. Likewise for a Silvia. Or the EM7000 with a free EM0480 for around $750 (David Jones)
    Silvia is $499 new.

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    558
    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
    I'd be cautious about recommending a Silvia. It seems like an excellent machine but from the comments on here you'd want to be a dedicated coffee snob to get decent coffee from one. Giving one as a gift to an amateur is just going to add another item to eBay. Like giving a puppy, you want to make sure you aren't just handing over something that will be neglected because they never learn to look after it.
    Yes I thoroughly agree. In the email I sent to my friend I wrote about 4 paragraphs explaining that while the Silvia is arguably the cheapest machine that replicates cafe quality lattes, there's a steep learning curve.

    In any event, I suspect it's one of those Mother's Day presents that's really for the children. He told me his sister, who still lives at home, is a budding hipster barista, so the Silvia should be perfect.

  13. #13
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    6,630
    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
    I'd be cautious about recommending a Silvia. It seems like an excellent machine but from the comments on here you'd want to be a dedicated coffee snob to get decent coffee from one.
    Morning Journyman, this statement is wrong, there is nothing difficult about the Silvia, if you you are not making good coffee on a Silvia within a few days of buying it I would suggest your a slow learner.

    I would be very cautious about judging machines based on comments you have read online, there's lots of misinformation posted by those with vested interests.

    There's a good reason why the Rancillio Silvia has been one of the most successful home espresso machines (worldwide) over the past 15 years "it has become the standard against which all other consumer, single boiler machines are measured, currently in its 3rd revision."

  14. #14
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    6,630
    I'm wondering how many posters in this thread who are suggesting Silvia is difficult to use actually own one? this really is misinformation.

  15. #15
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Aust.
    Posts
    914
    All the same basics re: the right grind fineness, filter basket filling and tamping etc apply to any machine. The main difference with the Silvia compared to the cheaper Sunbeam and Breville thermoblock/thermocoil machines is that the Silvia is a single boiler machine. People just need to understand the concept of priming (keeping water level up in the boiler), to avoid issues with the heating element, especially before steaming. This would apply to all boiler machines and is not a difficult concept to master.

    The foolproof way of avoiding issues is to get into a routine.

    1./ Check there is water in the reservoir before switching the Silvia on.
    2./ As soon as you switch on run water through the Steam wand using the Hot water button until there is a steady stream of water (about 1/2 cup or more) to be sure the boiler is full
    3./ If you Brew before steaming you may want to repeat 2./ before steaming depending on how many cups you've brewed and how much milk you intend to Steam. I usually prime again prior to Steaming just as a precaution.
    4./ After steaming I repeat 2./ to refill the boiler.

    As far as I know following these steps will keep the Silvia's heating element in good shape and avoid an early demise due to overheating it through lack of water in the boiler.

    The big advantages of the Silvia compared to most Themoblock/Thermocoil machines is that the Silvia allows you to play with temperture via temp surfing or PIDing and pressure via the OPV adjustment. Both of these play a big role in the quality of the brew.
    Last edited by CafeLotta; 7th May 2013 at 12:30 PM.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    558
    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    I'm wondering how many posters in this thread who are suggesting Silvia is difficult to use actually own one? this really is misinformation.
    Agreed. I had one for a few years, after having a sunbeam previously and it's a marvellous machine.

    At the price you can get a new one for now, it's a ridiculous bargain. Paired with a decent grinder, a little practice, fresh beans and a dollop of caring about your coffee, you can produce lattes better than 95% of cafes, or 99% if you live on a regional area.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    395
    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
    The good thing about a 6910 (or 7000) is it is push-button simple to use. Cleaning is simple too, and all machines need to be clean so maybe once he buys and gifts you can go around and run a class on making coffee, foaming milk and cleaning routines?
    a silvia is as difficult to use as a 6910 for the same approximate quality of coffee that you get.

    unless, of course, you're interested in making completely rubbish coffee, in which case you should get the 6910 with the dual wall baskets and preground coffee.

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    46
    Is this one gone yet? http://coffeesnobs.com.au/coffee-har...tml#post499517 incredible offer for someone looking to get into a Silvia

  19. #19
    Senior Member Journeyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bendigo
    Posts
    1,028
    It's not misinformation and I (clearly from my posts) do not have one. But there are many threads with people who DO have one talking about issues getting good coffee, repeatable results, needing to mod it to get a reliable machine etc. I was very clear in what I said - if there are vested interests making statements about the Silvia's I would like to point out they are not being called on it. From my reading here on CS, Silvias seem to have a steep learning curve - buying one as a gift for someone who has not expressed interest in achieving barista level competence may not be a good idea.

    Apparently even CafeLotta agrees - how many people coming from making instant coffee would even know what he talks about in his post up above?

    Given most 6910 owners get their machine, plug it in and can make reasonable coffee, just by pushing buttons per the manual, comments like
    unless, of course, you're interested in making completely rubbish coffee, in which case you should get the 6910 with the dual wall baskets and preground coffee.
    would come closer to misinformation. There are plenty of complaints about new Silvias which do not produce reasonable coffee from people who have not gone the route of learning to adjust to the special techniques required by the Silvia or who have not yet modded it to give the information needed for a novice to go beyond 'reasonable' coffee.

    Remember, the OP is NOT asking about buying a machine for himself, but wanting to advise a non-CS person on what to buy for his mother. ANY learning curve is likely to be too much for someone who has NOT an expressed interest in learning about such things.

    If you object to my comments, don't take it up with me; go talk to the Silvia owners who complain on this site.

  20. #20
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Aust.
    Posts
    914
    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
    Apparently even CafeLotta agrees - how many people coming from making instant coffee would even know what he talks about in his post up above
    I'm not sure what I was supposed to have agreed too? The point I was making was that the same skills that are required to make a really good brew apply to just about all espresso machines that use a portafilter. Grinding, filling & tamping correctly are the basic skills required and getting it wrong will spoil the brew equally on a EM6910 or a Silvia.

    The rest comes down to how well a machine controls temperature and pressure during extraction and to what degree the user can control or manipulate these on individual machines.

    I would suggest a fair percentage of people that buy something like an EM6910 don't make the effort to learn how to use and maintain it correctly which may have something to do with the consistantly large number appearing on the 2nd hand market. Obviously some are upgrading or have decided its not for them but I do wonder how many have taken it to the limits of what it is capable of?
    Yelta likes this.

  21. #21
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    6,630
    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
    It's not misinformation and I (clearly from my posts) do not have one. But there are many threads with people who DO have one talking about issues getting good coffee, repeatable results, needing to mod it to get a reliable machine etc. I was very clear in what I said - if there are vested interests making statements about the Silvia's I would like to point out they are not being called on it. From my reading here on CS, Silvias seem to have a steep learning curve - buying one as a gift for someone who has not expressed interest in achieving barista level competence may not be a good idea.

    Apparently even CafeLotta agrees - how many people coming from making instant coffee would even know what he talks about in his post up above?

    Given most 6910 owners get their machine, plug it in and can make reasonable coffee, just by pushing buttons per the manual, comments like would come closer to misinformation. There are plenty of complaints about new Silvias which do not produce reasonable coffee from people who have not gone the route of learning to adjust to the special techniques required by the Silvia or who have not yet modded it to give the information needed for a novice to go beyond 'reasonable' coffee.

    Remember, the OP is NOT asking about buying a machine for himself, but wanting to advise a non-CS person on what to buy for his mother. ANY learning curve is likely to be too much for someone who has NOT an expressed interest in learning about such things.

    If you object to my comments, don't take it up with me; go talk to the Silvia owners who complain on this site.
    Morning Journeyman,

    This really is a strange discussion, my views are based on having owned and used a Silvia daily for 10 years and your basing your opinions on what you have read on a forum/s, a bit like writing a review for a car you have never driven, based entirely on what you have read about it, you quote (and seem to accept) Cafelotta as an authority (he may well be) and ignore my opinion, a longtime Silvia owner and CoffeeSnob member.

    I'll say it again, the Silvia is not a difficult machine to use, and no, they do not have a steep learning curve.

    I do agree that buying any single boiler or HX machine as a gift for someone who has not expressed a desire for one is probably not a good idea.

    You say

    "There are plenty of complaints about new Silvias which do not produce reasonable coffee from people who have not gone the route of learning to adjust to the special techniques required by the Silvia"
    There are no special techniques needed to successfully operate an unmodified Silvia, I would suggest a lot of the confusion comes from the tinkerers that claim you cannot make a decent espresso on a Silvia that has not been PID's, gronked or modified in some other way, these claims are simply wrong.

    So, Ill say it again, most of what has been written in this thread is based on hearsay, none of the posters even claimed to have used Silvia, let alone actually having owned one,
    The Silvia is not a difficult machine to use right out of the carton.

    There is good reason for this statement from CoffeeGeek,
    "the Rancillio Silvia has been one of the most successful home espresso machines (worldwide) over the past 15 years it has become the standard against which all other consumer, single boiler machines are measured"

    You say,
    "If you object to my comments, don't take it up with me; go talk to the Silvia owners who complain on this site."
    I have no problem with anyone with a new machine asking for assistance, what does bother me is people regurgitating hearsay and misinformation.
    Last edited by Yelta; 8th May 2013 at 11:07 AM.

  22. #22
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    493
    Having owned and used a Silvia for quite a while (though I've now stepped sideways to an E-61 SB) I agree with Yelta, they're not especially difficult to use out of the box, the main limiting factor is, as always, basic operator technique; grind, dose and tamp.

    Yes, I PID'd my Silvia after about 6 months, but that was because I like to play with things rather than it being necessary to produce good coffee.

    Though I would not recommend one to somebody who wasn't interested in coffee, but the same goes for any espresso machine.

  23. #23
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Aust.
    Posts
    914
    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    ........ you quote (and seem to accept) Cafelotta as an authority (he may well be) and ignore my opinion, a longtime Silvia owner and CoffeeSnob member.

    I'll say it again, the Silvia is not a difficult machine to use, and no, they do not have a steep learning curve.
    I'm definetly not an authority Yelta!! I'm basing my opinions on my experiences with the machines I have used. Over time we've had 3 different thermoblock/thermocoil machines in the household, first boiler machine a Saeco Via Venezia and now the Silvia. I actively experimented with each machine I've used and my comments are based on that. Still on the journey of discovery.

    As I said previously, I've found the same principles apply to all the machines I've used. The learning curve is a case of understanding the preparation basics and also understanding your machine, no matter the brand. In the case of the Silvia or any boiler machine, the first thing to understand is that you don't keep running the boiler dry and then expect a long life from the machine. Simple but important. The main reason I harp on about that is because the person I bought my used Silvia from made a song and dance about having done a barista course but still managed to ruin the heating element in their machine after having owned it for only 1-1/2 years.

    I've found the Silvia can make great coffee but also highlights lack of attention to detail in your process quickly. Once the variables are sorted on a particular bean, consistency is great as long as you don't get lazy with your preparation. Comes down to what you enjoy in the cup. My 2 cents worth.

    Personally, I'm not sure I would buy a Silvia for a first time user unless someone was there to guide them through.

    P.S. I think most people have come to the Silvia after previous experience on other machines. Some of the concepts are familiar and some new (priming). Maybe as time goes on we demand more from the coffee we brew? I know I do!
    Last edited by CafeLotta; 8th May 2013 at 04:01 PM.

  24. #24
    Senior Member Journeyman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bendigo
    Posts
    1,028
    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
    I'd be cautious about recommending a Silvia. It seems like an excellent machine but from the comments on here you'd want to be a dedicated coffee snob to get decent coffee from one. Giving one as a gift to an amateur is just going to add another item to eBay. Like giving a puppy, you want to make sure you aren't just handing over something that will be neglected because they never learn to look after it.

    The good thing about a 6910 (or 7000) is it is push-button simple to use. Cleaning is simple too, and all machines need to be clean so maybe once he buys and gifts you can go around and run a class on making coffee, foaming milk and cleaning routines?
    This was all I said; it seems clear enough I was not running down the Silvia and I was simply advising caution in getting a machine that would require some expertise to use successfully. I even gave my source as 'comments on here' so I still dispute the 'misinformation' tag. And even though I said the 6910 is simple to use, I still advised the OP offer some training - presumably that would include 'grind/dose'tamp practice.

    Again I point out that the OP is once removed from the eventual owner - to me it's a given NOT to advise a machine that seems, (again from comments on here) to require some knowledge.

  25. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    558
    Interesting discussion!

    As the OP, I can assure you that I've made my friend fully aware of the learning curve with the Silvia, and I wouldn't recommend it to him unless I was confident he had the ability to use it.

    But I agree with others who say that the Silvia is really quite easy to use as long as you care about making good coffee and you can follow a consistent process. There's virtually no skill involved, anybody can grind, dose and tamp well enough to produce good coffee with just a little care and attention.

    Like many of you, I have friends who have a half-decent machine at home, but struggle to get good results from it, yet when you suggest that perhaps beans from the supermarket aren't their best option, they say they believe you, but keep buying crap stale beans. Or when you try to explain why a cold machine produces crap, their eyes glaze over. I wouldn't recommend a Silvia to them.

    But the friend I am recommending it to is the type of person who tries to master everything he does, so I'm very confident that he'll pick it up very quickly. (It's ostensibly a Mother's Day present but I've deduced that's just a cover for him and his sister to get their hands on a decent machine, clearly a budding coffee snob!)

  26. #26
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    6,630
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonathon View Post
    (It's ostensibly a Mother's Day present but I've deduced that's just a cover for him and his sister to get their hands on a decent machine, clearly a budding coffee snob!)
    There's more than one way to skin a cat.

  27. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    395
    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
    Given most 6910 owners get their machine, plug it in and can make reasonable coffee, just by pushing buttons per the manual, comments like would come closer to misinformation. There are plenty of complaints about new Silvias which do not produce reasonable coffee from people who have not gone the route of learning to adjust to the special techniques required by the Silvia or who have not yet modded it to give the information needed for a novice to go beyond 'reasonable' coffee.
    What special techniques?

    - a completely unmodded silvia has better temperature stability than a 6910 (see The Pullman Tamper | Review - Sunbeam EM6910 vs Rancilio Silvia)
    - dose, tamp, and grind are common
    - the silvia has an impossible-to-use single basket
    - the sunbeam comes with dual-wall baskets.

    I _am_ a silvia owner who complains - but i complain that my silvia is not as good as a 4k commercial machine.

    my question to you is:

    what machine produces coffee as good as a silvia in the hands of an experienced barista, without training?

  28. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    558
    Quote Originally Posted by Hildy View Post
    what machine produces coffee as good as a silvia in the hands of an experienced barista, without training?
    Or more specifically, what machine this side of $1,000 produces coffee as good.

  29. #29
    TC
    TC is offline
    .
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    14,665
    More Silvia bashing....

    At $500 it's a bargain and will be around a whole lot longer than any appliance. A tiny modicum of care will result is excellent espresso and prefect microfoam.

  30. #30
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    21
    Just on that review linked above... that was done in 2007... Apparently (although this is hearsay, as I don't have a series of different year 6910s) Sunbeam have made improvements to the machine based on feedback they've received (though they never addressed the noise...). I've got an EM6910 from late 2011 and if I set the brew temp to +4 as per that review, my coffee gets burnt. I don't have the tools to measure the temp, but judging by flavour the factory default seems to be the correct setting. Has thermostability improved since the Pullman review? I don't know. Wasn't someone doing more testing on this?

  31. #31
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    75
    **Disclosure: I am the Brisbane Sunbeam Coffee School Trainer, school located at cup in woolloongabba.

    Interesting topic, but I think it's far better to get back to the question of:

    What does the mother want
    how much time is she willing to put into it?

    There seems to be a common thread where people crap on about one machine or the other, but at the end of the day if the person making coffees isn't interested in investing even just a little bit of time with their coffee skills, then neither a sunbeam nor a silvia is the right choice, and you can put that money towards something that is more appropriate for her needs. i.e. a pod machine.
    A new em6910 while out of the price range of the OP includes hands on barista training, a coffee dvd demonstrating the basics to getting a decent shot and milk, and also includes a set of dual wall baskets for those that want to go the supermarket coffee route. In some promotions that are run, a free em0480 grinder is also included.

    It seems not uncommon to hear people say nowadays that if you want shit coffee then get an em6910's on this forum, and it's quite interesting to see how this opinion has come about over the past couple of years because this wasn't the tone of this forum even just three or four years ago. I will respectfully disagree of course.

    I believe that in the majority of cases, with respect to dosing, grinding, tamping, and steaming milk, the upper limit of a barista's technical ability is the determining factor, and not the machine itself. Of course, no-one will ever believe me but in one roastery that I worked at previously, a new Lamarzocco and robur combo was producing coffees that were inferior to what I was able to get out of the Sunbeam. I questioned the director of the company at the time, and he just shrugged his shoulders and said that's how they did it and we weren't allowed to change the the parameters of how it was done. That company then had a directors meeting with staff from interstate several months down the track, and the out of towners were mightily impressed by a sunbeam when it was paired with our blend of coffee and a robur.

    When I used to live in a dodgy sharehouse with Luke Schilling (now of Ltd Espresso), he brought home a mazzer super jolly and we made coffees out of that and the sunbeam with black sheep coffee. It was quite comparable to what came out of the synesso saber(?) that Mark Gloftis used at the time especially when considering the differences in cost of setup. Having said that, black sheep out of Luke's trainer giotto offered a very different texture to the black sheep espresso and I found that very enjoyable too.

    As an aside, I will be on the stand at MICE so if anyone is going, feel free to come and say hello, tell me I'm full of it and what-not. I'll make you a coffee and we'll see how we go.

    Anthony Lau

    PS- I don't know how to change my user name and I am no longer affiliated with Naked Coffee.

  32. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    395
    Quote Originally Posted by ant_nakedcoffee View Post
    It seems not uncommon to hear people say nowadays that if you want shit coffee then get an em6910's on this forum, and it's quite interesting to see how this opinion has come about over the past couple of years because this wasn't the tone of this forum even just three or four years ago. I will respectfully disagree of course.
    I didn't say that.

    What I said was that the Silvia and 6910 were about as difficult as each other for equivalent quality of coffee output, and that the 6910 offered an option for those uninterested in good coffee (being the dual wall basket).

  33. #33
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    558
    So just to close off the OP, my friend bought a Silvia and Rocky. I spent an hour or two with him this week. I took him through all the usual stuff of dialling in the grinder, dosing, tamping, etc and by the end he was pulling shots that were pretty good.

    His steaming was all over the place, but that's just a beginner thing, nothing practice won't fix and of course the Silvia's steaming ability is ridiculously good for $499.

    So in summary, as long as they have someone to show them the ropes, or access to youtube, and are keen to make good coffee, the Silvia is an excellent entry level machine.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 25th September 2011, 08:37 PM
  2. Silvia and Sunbeam grinder, can the Sunbeam handle the Silvia?
    By kgphotography in forum Brewing Equipment - Midrange ($500-$1500)
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 20th May 2011, 04:05 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •