Results 1 to 19 of 19
Like Tree17Likes
  • 2 Post By woodhouse
  • 1 Post By LeroyC
  • 1 Post By simonsk8r
  • 1 Post By Gil80
  • 1 Post By Gil80
  • 1 Post By theosouris
  • 3 Post By luca
  • 3 Post By level3ninja
  • 2 Post By simonsk8r
  • 1 Post By level3ninja
  • 1 Post By Malaysian

Thread: V60 - What type to buy and should I go for mesh or paper?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    19

    V60 - What type to buy and should I go for mesh or paper?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi guys,

    Looking at eBay and other websites, I see plenty of V60 variants.
    I like the all-in-one designs but I'm not sure if there are pros/cons to this over the classic dripper and pot design.

    For the classic design, would you use the plastic dripper or ceramic/glass?

    Lastly, does anyone have any experience with mesh filter vs. paper filter?

    Looking at eBay, I'm interested in eBay link removed as per Site Posting Policy
    But before I commit to buying, I'm really interested to hear about your experiences and what would you recommend.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Javaphile; 15th June 2018 at 03:50 PM. Reason: removed ebay link(s)

  2. #2
    Senior Member woodhouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    248
    v60-02, plastic, paper filters. plastic is the best at heat retention. the advantage of the traditional design is that you can lift the whole device off the carafe after you finish brewing. the chemex-style v60 brewer you posted may be a little hard to clean - that's the issue with all-in-ones. you can sit the normal one on a mug if you want - it's pretty cool like that.
    topshot and Gil80 like this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member magnafunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Shepp City, VIC
    Posts
    523
    Site sponsor coffee parts do decent prices on v60

  4. #4
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Woodend, New Zealand
    Posts
    2,165
    Quote Originally Posted by Gil80 View Post
    Something likeeBay link removed as per Site Posting Policy (any cheaper sites to buy from?)
    or eBay link removed as per Site Posting Policy
    Either of them will do depending on how you want to use it. You don’t really need the glass carafe if you’re only going to be making a single drink each time, but they’re not particularly expensive so I guess it’s good to have the option. This is the exact set up I have and it’s great. The plastic V60 with the paper filters is the way to go. Watch a tutorial on YouTube for how to use it properly. There’s good ones by people like Scott Rao, Matt Perger and Chris Baca along with many others. Personally I find Scott Rao’s method gives the best results, but I do vary it at times.
    Last edited by Javaphile; 15th June 2018 at 03:51 PM. Reason: removed ebay link(s)
    Gil80 likes this.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    10
    Hi Gil80, how did you get on and what did you end up getting? I use a French press at work and love the result, and have been thinking about trying the V60 method. Any advice would be great.

  6. #6
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    1,031
    Quote Originally Posted by lynchpin View Post
    Hi Gil80, how did you get on and what did you end up getting? I use a French press at work and love the result, and have been thinking about trying the V60 method. Any advice would be great.
    French press is great, but V60 I tend to use more, produces a much cleaner, delicate cup. Great for complex coffees with a ton of things going on! I have the plastic V60 and use paper filters. It's great exploring all the different brewing methods, and heaps of fun. You learn so much using them all too!

    Ps. Welcome to the forums lynchpin, great to see you getting amongst it
    lynchpin likes this.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by lynchpin View Post
    Hi Gil80, how did you get on and what did you end up getting? I use a French press at work and love the result, and have been thinking about trying the V60 method. Any advice would be great.
    Hi.
    I got the v60 plastic and itís great.
    I use Scott Raoís recepie and I really enjoy it.
    it's a bit of work but still worth it if you like clear and crisp coffee.

    I also use fresh press but my grinder is poor in consistency for French press.
    I have to use a filter grind setting and shorten the brew time to 6 minutes to get good results.
    lynchpin likes this.

  8. #8
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Gil80 View Post
    Hi.
    I got the v60 plastic and it’s great.
    I use Scott Rao’s recepie and I really enjoy it.
    Awesome, I'll check this out for sure. When you say you have a plastic v60, is that the Hario, or are they all much the same? Do different kettles/pots make much difference? Appreciate the advice!

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by lynchpin View Post
    Awesome, I'll check this out for sure. When you say you have a plastic v60, is that the Hario, or are they all much the same? Do different kettles/pots make much difference? Appreciate the advice!
    It is hario.
    The pot is glass but the pour over thingy is made of plastic as it doesn't absorb the heat, or something like that.
    It's explained in the youtube video by Scott Rao on his V60 recipe
    lynchpin likes this.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    I'm an Aussie based in Abu Dhabi but currently working in Rwanda
    Posts
    25
    I have the 02 model both ceramic and plastic - ceramic at home and plastic at work. I can't really tell the difference to be hones (incl heat retention.

    I would suggest get plastic to try it and move up to ceramic if you enjoy it.

    Hario is great fun for getting extras relatively accessible (I have gone crazy with the scales, kettle, carafe etc).

  11. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    I'm an Aussie based in Abu Dhabi but currently working in Rwanda
    Posts
    25
    Quote Originally Posted by theosouris View Post
    I have the 02 model both ceramic and plastic - ceramic at home and plastic at work. I can't really tell the difference to be hones (incl heat retention.

    I would suggest get plastic to try it and move up to ceramic if you enjoy it.

    Hario is great fun for getting extras relatively accessible (I have gone crazy with the scales, kettle, carafe etc).
    James Hoffman also had a great video online recently comparing different Hario papers - worth a look too.
    lestone likes this.

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    9
    Ive owned ceramic, glass and plastic versions of the v60, love the look of the glass one above a nice server and travel with the plastic is really handy

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,902
    If I were buying a v60, I'd probably go with plastic. However, I find v60 a very difficult brew method and that it is usually under-extracted at even the very best cafes. I have tended to get better cups in cafes from the kalita wave, which is not to say that it's a better gadget, just that that has been my experience.

    Filter brewers are quite difficult to use because the grind size determines the steep time as well as the extraction, so you can't really increase steep time to increase extraction. Immersion brewers are easier in this sense and I used the clever dripper at the world brewers' cup on short notice and with good results; James Hoffmann placed one place higher than me with a steep and cloth filter brew method. These are probably easier to start with at home.

    After all of these years of non-espresso brewing, I still don't have a good go-to method. My current method is to do an immersion brew with about 50-75% of the brew water for quite some time, then to transfer this to a filter, let it drain and use the remainder of the brew water to finish the brew as a filter brewing method. The immersion portion of the brew allows me to control the extraction better by increasing steep time above what the grind size would allow in a filter brew. The filter portion of the brew gives the extraction efficiency of a filter brew, so you get a marginally greater yield, since the liquid left in the ground coffee mass is not brew strength, but rather is basically clean brew water that has extracted nothing.

    You can sort of play around with mesh and paper as you like, but generally paper has a cleaner flavour (if well rinsed and not papery) and gives greater flow rate restriction to slow the brew down. I have a metal able filter and I put that inside the paper filter in the above brew method, since I don't need the flow rate to regulate brew time and this way it helps to stop the paper filter from clogging, leading to a faster flow rate.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Republic of China
    Posts
    161
    Pourover just does not work in a cafe setting. It's funny because in most cafes it is the premium option, presumably because they typically use a SO. However if you watch, it is typically rush poured, with very little attention. So $4.50 for a sour cup of watery coffee. Just this trend alone has probably turned so many people off filter coffee... it was a sad day when the hipsters took over coffee..

  15. #15
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,191
    Quote Originally Posted by pyrmontboy200 View Post
    Pourover just does not work in a cafe setting. It's funny because in most cafes it is the premium option, presumably because they use a SO. However if you watch, it is typically rush poured, with very little attention. So $4.50 for a sour cup of watery coffee. Just this trend alone has probably turned so many people off filter coffee... it was a sad day when the hipsters took over coffee..
    If they're set up for it, it's less hands-on than making a latte. My wife and I were at ONA on Canberra a couple of weeks ago and got 2x pour-overs. They weren't cheap as they were high end beans, but they single dosed them through an EK43 then sat the V60 set up under an automatic pour machine and pushed a button. Obviously there's work in setting up the grind and water settings but once you have a recipe you're looking at 15s input from a barista. And yes, they were delicious.
    Dimal, pyrmontboy200 and simonsk8r like this.

  16. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Republic of China
    Posts
    161
    It's funny, I was going to qualify pourover by saying manual pourover, but it looked redundant.

    Anyway, what you mention is not what I regard as pourover, that is basically auto drip. If it is setup and dialled in, so the poor old, run off his feet barista doesn't have to concentrate, then maybe. Still, never have had a good batch brew in Sydney either, your mileage may vary

  17. #17
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    1,031
    Quote Originally Posted by pyrmontboy200 View Post
    Pourover just does not work in a cafe setting. It's funny because in most cafes it is the premium option, presumably because they typically use a SO. However if you watch, it is typically rush poured, with very little attention. So $4.50 for a sour cup of watery coffee. Just this trend alone has probably turned so many people off filter coffee... it was a sad day when the hipsters took over coffee..
    Yeah I've only had great experiences with most cafes who had pour over option. It does work if you set a plan of how to incorporate it into your workflow. It does obviously slow things down a little and it is hard to do them in a rush period (I worked at a cafe that served Chemex and Aeropress), but it's doable and achievable to serve a quality beverage.

    And I reckon the (re)introduction of filter options has only expanded the exposure to not only different ways of drinking coffee, but of high quality coffees that only really shine in filter. But that's just me!
    pyrmontboy200 and level3ninja like this.

  18. #18
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,191
    Quote Originally Posted by pyrmontboy200 View Post
    It's funny, I was going to qualify pourover by saying manual pourover, but it looked redundant.

    Anyway, what you mention is not what I regard as pourover, that is basically auto drip. If it is setup and dialled in, so the poor old, run off his feet barista doesn't have to concentrate, then maybe. Still, never have had a good batch brew in Sydney either, your mileage may vary
    I can't see the functional difference. It's not just a stream of water in the middle, it spreads it out with multiple streams. And it was the exact same V60 over server setup your use for a manual pour. Tasted the same as the best manual V60s I've had (haven't had that many though). If the extraction is the same what's the difference?

    Haven't been game to try a batch brew yet, I'm always worried that they'll want to serve it even if it's a bit off because they made so much, and when I find somewhere I'd trust to do it right they have other things that interest me more.

    Also I'm near Liverpool so not as lot of options nearby.
    pyrmontboy200 likes this.

  19. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    19
    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    My suggestion is to go with whichever is cheaper and invest in better grinder/kettle. I have a plastic 2 cup with me at the moment with a Hario Buono. Doing V60 could be fun or frustrating depending on how you see it. I enjoy it because I am able to play around with different grind size, time and ratio. Usually take me 2-3 adjustments until I find the perfect profile for myself. But expect to have more adjustments in your early days of V60.

    Quote Originally Posted by pyrmontboy200 View Post
    Pourover just does not work in a cafe setting. It's funny because in most cafes it is the premium option, presumably because they typically use a SO. However if you watch, it is typically rush poured, with very little attention. So $4.50 for a sour cup of watery coffee. Just this trend alone has probably turned so many people off filter coffee... it was a sad day when the hipsters took over coffee..
    Have to agree on that. Been to multiple coffee shops in Melbourne but I've noticed most do it with machines these days. However, I still find it strange that they're still not consistent. Been to Seven Seeds Carlton twice - first time was really good but second time was under extracted, they use Moccamaster. Went to Cartel Coffee that just opened in Melbourne CBD, they used a BKON with geisha coffee - had really high expectation but was somewhat disappointed because the flavour was flat (employee tasted my cup and agreed with me).
    pyrmontboy200 likes this.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •