Results 1 to 21 of 21
Like Tree4Likes
  • 1 Post By LeroyC
  • 1 Post By woodhouse
  • 1 Post By simonsk8r
  • 1 Post By woodhouse

Thread: Which manual brewing process produces STRONGEST coffee?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    20

    Which manual brewing process produces STRONGEST coffee?

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    I love various different manual brewing processes. Aeropress, Moka, French Press are the methods I have tried so far. Am wondering what other methods there are that I could try and what manual process is likely to produce the strongest coffee, I know it is subjective based on method, beans etc but just in general?

    Thanks all.

  2. #2
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Woodend, New Zealand
    Posts
    2,320
    Without a doubt it’s the moka pot.
    Rolf likes this.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    43
    Manual Espresso e.g. Flair Espresso

  4. #4
    Senior Member woodhouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    384
    Quote Originally Posted by LeroyC View Post
    Without a doubt it’s the moka pot.
    moka pots top out around 2-3% total dissolved solids. the flair will deliver a proper strong shot of around 10% at a 1:2 brew ratio.

    actually something i've been meaning to do is measure aeropresso shots. i'll see if i can get around to it this week.
    matth3wh likes this.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    SYD
    Posts
    590
    How about Turkish?

  6. #6
    Senior Member simonsk8r's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Geelong
    Posts
    1,129
    Hmmm depends what you mean by strength.. strength is generally a function of the ratio of coffee:water. More coffee and less water it will 'taste' stronger. Increase brewing/immersion time (to a certain extent) and it will do this too.

    Generally pourover filter brews like V60 and Chemex are not meant to be 'strong' in flavour but much more subtle and with a range of flavors to detect (of course depends on how you brew it. If you make the grind REALLY fine, and updose like crazy it'll change this).

    Plungers are generally more bold/strong, but with any immersion brewing method you could just leave the coffee in contact with water for a ridiculously long time, and it would taste strong... but interesting.

    Moka pot or plunger I'd go with, but also would say there's much more to coffee than it being strong or not strong ;D
    dan77 likes this.

  7. #7
    Senior Member speleomike's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    948
    Hi all

    I think Turkish coffee would be stronger than Moka as the grind required for Turkish is the finest of all the methods and so would have the maximum extraction and contain more solids. Also as the water is in direct contact with the coffee during the entire procedure. Turkish can be so strong that you can *feel* the solids on your palate.

    Mike

  8. #8
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Woodend, New Zealand
    Posts
    2,320
    Quote Originally Posted by woodhouse View Post
    moka pots top out around 2-3% total dissolved solids. the flair will deliver a proper strong shot of around 10% at a 1:2 brew ratio.

    actually something i've been meaning to do is measure aeropresso shots. i'll see if i can get around to it this week.
    Ah yes good point, I read the original post a bit too quickly. From the list in the original post it’s definitely the moka pot as you are generally stuck with a fairly narrow brew ratio range. Even if you were to use a French press to make a drink at a similar brew ratio it would still lack the syrupy body and unique flavour the moka pot gives. But as you say one of the manual espresso makers like the Flair will be at another level again. So seeing as the OP is looking for other options this is what I’d be pointing to. There’s also the the ROK, the Newton Espresso, and the soon to be released Leverpresso and Robot. Not to mention all the ‘faux espresso’ makers such as the Nanopresso and Staresso.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    20
    Oh the Flair! Wow. I am so close to being sold on it. I tend to drink my coffee as a long black with a dash of cream, hence why French press etc was convenient. Given I am not really an espresso type, would I be wasting a machine like this? Or just pull a shot, add water and add cream?

  10. #10
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    100
    What about an espresso if you take just the first 10ml. That really knocks off sox.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PRL
    Posts
    2,705
    Quote Originally Posted by Poena View Post
    Oh the Flair! Wow. I am so close to being sold on it. I tend to drink my coffee as a long black with a dash of cream, hence why French press etc was convenient. Given I am not really an espresso type, would I be wasting a machine like this? Or just pull a shot, add water and add cream?
    Yeh, have you tried a long black made on an espresso base? It's quite different to a black coffee soft brewed. Just a matter of personal preference. Machines like the Flair and (more expensive) Bacchi produce espresso like coffee. The Bacchi is amazing but costs quite a bit and probably pushes the definition of 'manual brewing process'

  12. #12
    Senior Member woodhouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    384
    Quote Originally Posted by Poena View Post
    Oh the Flair! Wow. I am so close to being sold on it. I tend to drink my coffee as a long black with a dash of cream, hence why French press etc was convenient. Given I am not really an espresso type, would I be wasting a machine like this? Or just pull a shot, add water and add cream?
    definitely not wasting anything. espresso is its own thing. get one and pull many delicious shots ��
    Otago likes this.

  13. #13
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    20
    I am convinced. Have done heaps of reading and been watching lots of videos. I love it. I love the tinkering and process that goes into it and especially love that I can get decent coffee without the price and maintenance of a decent machine. Going to give myself a one month cooling off period, make sure that I am not impulse buying and that way I can get it for my birthday.

    In the mean time is there anywhere in Brisbane that has them or the option to try a coffee from one? Strange idea but wouldn't mind being really certain and trying before buying.

  14. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    20
    Quote Originally Posted by Barry O'Speedwagon View Post
    Yeh, have you tried a long black made on an espresso base? It's quite different to a black coffee soft brewed. Just a matter of personal preference. Machines like the Flair and (more expensive) Bacchi produce espresso like coffee. The Bacchi is amazing but costs quite a bit and probably pushes the definition of 'manual brewing process'
    I really haven't. Anytime I have had an espresso base it has been with milk (Flat White) and I am having to avoid milk at the moment. Can manage a dash of cream without consequences so just changed my coffee style to suit. Couldn't afford expensive coffee makers so went with quality beans and french press or the moka pot. Found coffee shops have crappy cream or their coffee tastes burnt and over extracted and I like my homemade so just avoid buying coffee when out.

  15. #15
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Posts
    100
    What about a “red eye”??
    I think that’s a long black with a double shot on the top.
    That’s one I might try tomorrow to start the Monday motor

  16. #16
    Senior Member woodhouse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    384
    Quote Originally Posted by Grillsy View Post
    What about a “red eye”??
    I think that’s a long black with a double shot on the top.
    That’s one I might try tomorrow to start the Monday motor
    pretty sure that's a double shot on top of a filter coffee. i've also heard it called a 'shot in the dark'.

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    20
    If I was to get the Flair Espresso maker will a Lido 3 be a sufficient grinder for it? I purchased my grinder for the french press and traveling so I went the Lido 3 instead of Lido E, now kicking myself I had a laugh.Thoughts?

    Ta

  18. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Hobart TAS
    Posts
    297
    Hi Poena

    I have a Flair and Lido 3. While I now tend to use my Aergrind with the Flair, the Lido 3 is also perfectly capable of espresso grinding. The only downside is that it can be a little more difficult to dial in because it has a courser thread than that available on the Lido Es.
    I can certainly recommend the Flair and, if you decided to get one, I think you ought to give it a go with the Lido 3 and see how you get on with it before deciding to swap for an E. You may not find any difficulty with adjustments in the espresso range.

  19. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    20
    That is great to know, thank you. What setting range would it be roughly on the Lido 3?

    I also saw that there is a bottomless 2 in 1 Portafilter for the Flair? What is that for or does that do? Sorry if that is a silly question, I know nothing about espresso machines....at all. Probably shouldn't admit that here I had a laugh!

  20. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Hobart TAS
    Posts
    297
    Hi Poena

    An espresso grind on the Lido 3 will be right down near zero. I seemed to be near 3 to 4 notches, but depending on bean selection etc you may find it necessary to vary from that. I have only gravitated to the Aergrind because grind adjustment is much simpler than on the Lido.

    The 2 in 1 bottomless portafilter will help to diagnose extraction problems, especially whether there is any channelling. I think it will be interesting to see whether channelling is an issue on the Flair as the 41mm portafilter gives a higher diameter to depth ratio to the puck than on 58mm baskets. I presume the other side of the 2 in 1 moniker is that the spout base can be removed to allow cleaning of the otherwise enclosed area.

    It may not be an issue for you if you intend to buy a new Flair, but the 2-1 portafilter requires a different portafilter holder on the frame than that on earlier Flairs. That would be something to check on when making a purchase.

  21. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    20
    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Quote Originally Posted by Otago View Post
    Hi Poena

    An espresso grind on the Lido 3 will be right down near zero. I seemed to be near 3 to 4 notches, but depending on bean selection etc you may find it necessary to vary from that. I have only gravitated to the Aergrind because grind adjustment is much simpler than on the Lido.

    The 2 in 1 bottomless portafilter will help to diagnose extraction problems, especially whether there is any channelling. I think it will be interesting to see whether channelling is an issue on the Flair as the 41mm portafilter gives a higher diameter to depth ratio to the puck than on 58mm baskets. I presume the other side of the 2 in 1 moniker is that the spout base can be removed to allow cleaning of the otherwise enclosed area.

    It may not be an issue for you if you intend to buy a new Flair, but the 2-1 portafilter requires a different portafilter holder on the frame than that on earlier Flairs. That would be something to check on when making a purchase.
    Thank you. I did find this video of the portafilter and thought it was really interesting. https://m.facebook.com/story.php?sto...74740339386543



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •