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Thread: Breville BES900 Dual Boiler - Owners thread

  1. #5551
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    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Quote Originally Posted by mully99 View Post
    Thanks Inorog! Sorted one today from a local supplier.


    Another question for everone - and a real error on my part...

    Totally forgot to mark the probes in the steam boiler. I know the BLACK cabled probe is a long one (as I had to replace due to rust), but wondered if you knew whether the BLUE or RED cable is the short probe?

    Don't want to get this wrong and risk overheating the boiler.
    Red wire goes to the short probe at the side of the boiler closest to the edge of the chassis.

  2. #5552
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    FILTER BASKET STUCK!
    Hello everyone.
    We have been noticing that the double shot filter basket gets separated from the handle and lodged up in the group head (the shower where the hot water comes through to enter the coffee puck). On previous occasions, we simply jiggled it and it could be removed, however today it is well and truly stuck up there. I've tried running water through it briefly and tried to pull it out while wearing a rubber glove, which have proven impossible.
    This does not happen with the single shot basket and only started this week. We've had the machine a good 6 years or so and never experienced anything like this!
    Before I take it in for servicing, has anyone had this issue?
    Cheer

  3. #5553
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    How long since you replaced the group head seal?

  4. #5554
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    Hi All,

    Ive just overhauled my BES900 (new pump, Over pressure, valve steam valve and solenoid kit).

    All went relatively smoothly (grrrrr at the nut holding screw for the pump - wasnt welded properly to the steel chassis) - but Im having a problem with leaking from the 1/8 BSP Male to 4mm OD connector. I think its because I havent pushed the nylon pipe in enough (there is a a brass lug from the previous breville OPV that I havent removed, was a bit hesitant). AM I right in thinking I need to cut it off to push the pipe in enough?

  5. #5555
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    @howser999

    Could you post some pictures on how you did that setup?

  6. #5556
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    Fixed the problem BUT - NEW one has arisen. Seems like the steam ball valve is leaking from the top. I removed and checked O-ring which seemed fine, but I did notice that there was no little flat silver washer (not sure if there is meant to be one). Any suggestions.

    @Inorog - see photos attached.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #5557
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    Quote Originally Posted by howser999 View Post
    Fixed the problem BUT - NEW one has arisen. Seems like the steam ball valve is leaking from the top. I removed and checked O-ring which seemed fine, but I did notice that there was no little flat silver washer (not sure if there is meant to be one). Any suggestions.

    @Inorog - see photos attached.
    Does anyone have any ideas on how to fix the leak described?

  8. #5558
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    Does this leak cause you any issues or is it just that you hear the slight hissing sound which might be a tiny leak but everything else works normally?

  9. #5559
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    Quote Originally Posted by howser999 View Post
    Does anyone have any ideas on how to fix the leak described?
    Yes. You remove the ball valve, disassmble the valve, and flip the PTFE seals (washers) so the conical parts that were riding the ball, are now facing outwards from the ball. The PTFE will cold flow to the ball and make a new seal.

    More than you will ever need to know on the subject right here:
    https://www.home-barista.com/espress...0.html#p641819

    -Peter
    Last edited by pcrussell50; 9th March 2019 at 02:59 AM.
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  10. #5560
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    Quote Originally Posted by howser999 View Post
    Hi All,

    Ive just overhauled my BES900 (new pump, Over pressure, valve steam valve and solenoid kit).

    All went relatively smoothly (grrrrr at the nut holding screw for the pump - wasnt welded properly to the steel chassis) - but Im having a problem with leaking from the 1/8 BSP Male to 4mm OD connector. I think its because I havent pushed the nylon pipe in enough (there is a a brass lug from the previous breville OPV that I havent removed, was a bit hesitant). AM I right in thinking I need to cut it off to push the pipe in enough?
    Are you using a 4mm QC (push-in quick connect) or a 4mm compression fitting? No matter. In either case, you need a bare end. Me? I cut the Breville end off, but I cut it off far enough back that I can put it back together with an inline QC splice connector. I keep a bag of them around. Cheap form eBayZon. Also I keep a coil of 4mm OD PTFE tubing, also cheap, from eBayZon. 4mm fittings are common in pneumatic applications. If you live in a big city like Sydney or Melbourne, (and probably Brisie), you could certainly find engineering supply shops that would have all this. But eBayZon is easier and might be cheaper.

    -Peter

  11. #5561
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    I have happily owned a BES900 and BCG800 Smartgrinder for the last 8 years, and in that time have apparently enjoyed 2860 coffees according to the shot counter. The machine is starting to show some symptoms of aging, and I would welcome guidance on whether to take it in for an overhaul or consider putting that money into a new machine. I have tried to take pretty good care of the machine, always backwashing it after use. But it has never been descaled or serviced, and I have not run a cleaning cycle with tablets for a few years now. I also haven't replaced the water filter in the tank since I ran out of new ones a few years back, though the water here is very soft.

    The observed issues are:

    1) sometimes the machine overshoots when heating up, and it can be nearly impossible to get it to "sit" on 93 degrees. I try fiddling with running the water and steam to cool it, but to no avail. This most often happens if I let the machine fall into sleep mode - when I wake it, it tends to overshoot 93 as it heats up and wont allow shots to be poured.

    2) most recently, I had an experience where it wouldn't heat up past 71 degrees at all. I thought my machine had finally died, but it started working again the next day.

    3) ocassaionally I get weird pressure behaviour. For example, mid extraction I hear a terrible crunch noise, pressure goes to zero and then it recovers and continues. Other times, reverse pressure sucks the coffee puck onto the shower screen.

    If I do take it in for a service, I seek your advice on what I should request be done. Bear in mind it has never been serviced before. So if there are any standard faults with original BES900's those have never been rectified. Is there anything I should specifically ask for? And is it worth reinvesting in the machine if the quote ends up being pricey? What should I expect to pay?

  12. #5562
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    You would have no way of knowing this other than through vigorous participation here, because Breville does not publish DIY maintenance procedures that involve opening up the machine, but it takes more than just gentle care and cleaning.

    Anyhow, first things first... The cheapest to tackle yourself and causes the most egregious behaviour... The o-rings on the ends of the PTFE water tubes attached to the steam boiler break down over time and allow steam leaks. This is the classic cause of your items 1 and 2. The good news is, once you've had the cover off and everything dried out, it _should_ return to normal. You need to get yourself some size #007 o-rings (I use silicone, but others have used VITON and EPDM and they are all common). I pay $10USD from Amazon for 100 of them which includes post. It might be more expensive in Oz, but I can't imagine it would be devastatingly so. 100 of them will last you two lifetimes. There will be silicone boots glued to the boiler and PTFE tubes, with silicone adhesive. You will need to slide these up and out of the way. Some people just cut them off. I used an xacto razor knife and saved mine, though I didn't glue them back on. Using them might prolong the life of the o-rings by damping flex and vibration. But it you have plenty of o-rings and have to do the job every two years instead of three it's no big deal. The job is easy and quick, once you've done it.

    Do this first and report back. I'm less sure about your item 3, but by this time, it's time to disassemble and clean you solenoid, or replace it, and that _could_ be the cause of it.

    Soft as your water may be, I prefer certainty. I use scale-free water that I mix myself, or softened water where I change the softening media when hardness begins to show. Descaling of any proper espresso machine is a big deal. I try to use scale-free water and not descale at all. At the very least, you should send a sample of your tap water off to a lab for analysis of it's components. Calcium and magnesium carbonate are the primary constituents of scale.

    -Peter

  13. #5563
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    I have a ~6 year old 1st gen BES900XL double boiler that has very low flow, 1 ounce in 60 seconds with coffee in the portafilter, 2 ounces water with an empty portafilter. Pressure is good, solenoid (that I replaced a few years ago for similar low flow reason) is not making bad noises, machine is not telling me it needs descaling. I always use water from my under sink cartridge filter. Are the new 2nd gen double boilers more reliable? Does their user descale feature prevent this degradation in flow over time? I am trying to decide whether to ask Breville to fix or replace my unit with the new model... or perhaps jump to another brand.

  14. #5564
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    I am back, baby! I disassembled the machine and removed the solenoid valve again. It looked clean but what about inside. So I popped it in my workshop vise with the flange facing up, then took 3 test leads and connected to the solenoid (it is a 120v AC unit) to wires I probed into a nearby electrical outlet (please don't try this at home unless you know what you are doing). I was then able to cycle the solenoid valve at will by working one of the hot wires. Then I poured some vinegar on the flange and cycled the solenoid. The vinegar ran through it to get to the insides and out the outlet tube. Then I blew it out with compressed air. Reinstalled the solenoid and voila, major flow... 8 ounces of water in 40 seconds with no coffee... it had been only 2 ounces in 60 seconds before. I had to totally revamp my grind, dosing and tamping to accommodate the flow. getting perfect shots again.
    So I guess I'll keep the old 900 for awhile longer.
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  15. #5565
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    Quote Originally Posted by raylo32 View Post
    I am back, baby! I disassembled the machine and removed the solenoid valve again. It looked clean but what about inside. So I popped it in my workshop vise with the flange facing up, then took 3 test leads and connected to the solenoid (it is a 120v AC unit) to wires I probed into a nearby electrical outlet (please don't try this at home unless you know what you are doing). I was then able to cycle the solenoid valve at will by working one of the hot wires. Then I poured some vinegar on the flange and cycled the solenoid. The vinegar ran through it to get to the insides and out the outlet tube. Then I blew it out with compressed air. Reinstalled the solenoid and voila, major flow... 8 ounces of water in 40 seconds with no coffee... it had been only 2 ounces in 60 seconds before. I had to totally revamp my grind, dosing and tamping to accommodate the flow. getting perfect shots again.
    So I guess I'll keep the old 900 for awhile longer.
    Would it not have been easier to just put a litre of vinegar/lemon juice/citric acid into the water tank and run it all through the machine?

  16. #5566
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    Quote Originally Posted by raylo32 View Post
    I am back, baby! I disassembled the machine and removed the solenoid valve again. It looked clean but what about inside. So I popped it in my workshop vise with the flange facing up, then took 3 test leads and connected to the solenoid (it is a 120v AC unit) to wires I probed into a nearby electrical outlet (please don't try this at home unless you know what you are doing). I was then able to cycle the solenoid valve at will by working one of the hot wires. Then I poured some vinegar on the flange and cycled the solenoid. The vinegar ran through it to get to the insides and out the outlet tube. Then I blew it out with compressed air. Reinstalled the solenoid and voila, major flow... 8 ounces of water in 40 seconds with no coffee... it had been only 2 ounces in 60 seconds before. I had to totally revamp my grind, dosing and tamping to accommodate the flow. getting perfect shots again.
    So I guess I'll keep the old 900 for awhile longer.
    You were almost there. All you had to do was take out a 14mm (iirc) spanner and remove the electrical coil from the stem, and disassemble for a good cleaning. In fact, now that you are comfortable with removing your solenoid, I would do just that.

    -Peter

  17. #5567
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    Not really, this machine is not designed to be able to properly flush/remove all the descaling agent. Might get away with using a weak solution and doing several 8 ounce manual runs with just water... but not necessary since the solenoid that is the problem is an easy R&R.

    Quote Originally Posted by theonetruepath View Post
    Would it not have been easier to just put a litre of vinegar/lemon juice/citric acid into the water tank and run it all through the machine?
    Last edited by raylo32; 23rd March 2019 at 10:45 PM.

  18. #5568
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    Maybe I'll try that next time, but the vinegar treatment was very easy and worked great. It's like a whole new machine. Here is a brief video, please excuse the slightly jerky result as I was filming with one hand and working the wire to cycle the solenoid in the other. This from a second pour of vinegar. Got some mucky stuff out the first one.





    Quote Originally Posted by pcrussell50 View Post
    You were almost there. All you had to do was take out a 14mm (iirc) spanner and remove the electrical coil from the stem, and disassemble for a good cleaning. In fact, now that you are comfortable with removing your solenoid, I would do just that.

    -Peter
    Last edited by raylo32; 23rd March 2019 at 10:47 PM.

  19. #5569
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    I just purchased a used BES900 down here in NZ. It arrived and no water runs through the brew head.

    Observations:
    • The machine will pull water through for steam and hot water. I can run it and see the water being pulled from the tank
    • Ran it w/o a portafilter
    • No pressure shown on the gauge
    • No water comes through
    • I can hear the pump start and then ramp up, and if I hold down the first crack or second crack, I can hear it ramp up immediately.
    • Temp seems fine at 93C
    • 165 on shot counter, so 1650 shots


    I've contacted the previous owner to see what issues they might have had. I can post a video if it's helpful.

    Does anyone have any advice on troubleshooting this before I bring it into a shop?

  20. #5570
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    Minor update, I removed the solenoid and the gasket was cracked. As a test, I removed them did a little cleaning and put it back together. I ran a quick test and water does go through the brew head.

    I am going to pick up a new gasket next week.


    As for descaling, is it something that can be done at home or must one bring it into a service center?

  21. #5571
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    Having a temp problem with my BES900 - it heats up to 110c with flashing lights and I have to let hot water out of the outlet to bring it down to temp and then it is fine. Machine operates well with this workaround but how would I go about fixing this for good?

    I had some previous leaks and have replaced the o-rings in both boilers.

  22. #5572
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    So once it's down to the right temperature does it heat up and stop heating correctly out does it overheat the next times it's cool enough for the element to kick in?

  23. #5573
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    Quote Originally Posted by hathro View Post
    Having a temp problem with my BES900 - it heats up to 110c with flashing lights and I have to let hot water out of the outlet to bring it down to temp and then it is fine. Machine operates well with this workaround but how would I go about fixing this for good?
    My BES920 had the same problem, including a lot of gurgling sounds when sitting idle. You mentioned you replaced the o-rings already, but these problems completely disappeared for me once I did the same o-ring fix.

  24. #5574
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    It's only the first time. It overshoots to 110c, I then release water until the temp drops below 93, say 90, then it heats to 93 and stops.

  25. #5575
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    Hi
    New user here,
    I've tried searching for the temperature rating for the over temperature thermostat on the steam boiler to no success.
    It's in series with the Thermal fuse

    I am currently replacing the Thermal fuse (10a 167į) and thought while i have the machine apart it is worthwhile replacing the thermostat too, I don't want to reassemble the machine only to find another problem.

    Thanks
    Last edited by Shot; 23rd April 2019 at 01:44 PM.

  26. #5576
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    Quote Originally Posted by hathro View Post
    It's only the first time. It overshoots to 110c, I then release water until the temp drops below 93, say 90, then it heats to 93 and stops.
    Yeah same with my BES920. With mine though, if I let it idle for an hour or so it would occasionally over heat again, but the reading would still be 93. I was only able to get the correct reading by turning the machine off an on.

    Did this issue only appear after you replaced the o-rings? I wonder if there is steam escaping from the boiler, from possibly an o-ring not pushed down into place far enough.

  27. #5577
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jebus View Post
    Yeah same with my BES920. With mine though, if I let it idle for an hour or so it would occasionally over heat again, but the reading would still be 93. I was only able to get the correct reading by turning the machine off an on.

    Did this issue only appear after you replaced the o-rings? I wonder if there is steam escaping from the boiler, from possibly an o-ring not pushed down into place far enough.
    I'll have a look again and re-seat them. I actually got the machine as is as a project. Fixed the steam leaks and will keep investigating.

    I haven't let it run for longer than 15 minutes at this stage. Will need to do further testing.

  28. #5578
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    I would appreciate your advice. I took the machine below in and have been quoted $550 for a range of identified issues, but was advised that it's not possible to tell beforehand if those repairs will fix the machine or if there is a problem with the boiler. If the boiler is also faulty, then it could be a further $500 repair. Now I have a tough decision because those total repairs are almost the cost of a new Breville Dual Boiler. If I was confident that $550 would get a nicely working machine back I think I would do it, but would you take the risk of potentially outlaying the price of a new machine for a repaired one?

    Should I keep thinking about rescuing this machine, or get a new one and move on?

    Quote Originally Posted by Therin83 View Post
    I have happily owned a BES900 and BCG800 Smartgrinder for the last 8 years, and in that time have apparently enjoyed 2860 coffees according to the shot counter. The machine is starting to show some symptoms of aging, and I would welcome guidance on whether to take it in for an overhaul or consider putting that money into a new machine. I have tried to take pretty good care of the machine, always backwashing it after use. But it has never been descaled or serviced, and I have not run a cleaning cycle with tablets for a few years now. I also haven't replaced the water filter in the tank since I ran out of new ones a few years back, though the water here is very soft.

    The observed issues are:

    1) sometimes the machine overshoots when heating up, and it can be nearly impossible to get it to "sit" on 93 degrees. I try fiddling with running the water and steam to cool it, but to no avail. This most often happens if I let the machine fall into sleep mode - when I wake it, it tends to overshoot 93 as it heats up and wont allow shots to be poured.

    2) most recently, I had an experience where it wouldn't heat up past 71 degrees at all. I thought my machine had finally died, but it started working again the next day.

    3) ocassaionally I get weird pressure behaviour. For example, mid extraction I hear a terrible crunch noise, pressure goes to zero and then it recovers and continues. Other times, reverse pressure sucks the coffee puck onto the shower screen.

    If I do take it in for a service, I seek your advice on what I should request be done. Bear in mind it has never been serviced before. So if there are any standard faults with original BES900's those have never been rectified. Is there anything I should specifically ask for? And is it worth reinvesting in the machine if the quote ends up being pricey? What should I expect to pay?

  29. #5579
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    I'd keep an eye out for specials, they can be had for between $750-$900 sometimes at department stores. I think Bing Lee just had a 20% off sale on their eBay store before Easter but it's over now.

  30. #5580
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    $1000 / 2860 = 35 cents a coffee, plus beans. I think you are a winner. New machine would be another winner.

  31. #5581
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    Quote Originally Posted by Therin83 View Post
    I would appreciate your advice. I took the machine below in and have been quoted $550 for a range of identified issues, but was advised that it's not possible to tell beforehand if those repairs will fix the machine or if there is a problem with the boiler. If the boiler is also faulty, then it could be a further $500 repair. Now I have a tough decision because those total repairs are almost the cost of a new Breville Dual Boiler. If I was confident that $550 would get a nicely working machine back I think I would do it, but would you take the risk of potentially outlaying the price of a new machine for a repaired one?

    Should I keep thinking about rescuing this machine, or get a new one and move on?

    I'm assuming you're in Australia, but in case you aren't. I've heard that Breville has a fixed price repair program in the US, $350 for repair or replacement. Any chance you're in the US and can take advantage of that?

    If it were me, I'd not be putting $500 into an 8 year only machine. I'd aim for new with a full warranty, or move to one of the machines that it more easily user serviceable.

  32. #5582
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    Quote Originally Posted by greenkiwi00 View Post
    If it were me, I'd not be putting $500 into an 8 year only machine. I'd aim for new with a full warranty, or move to one of the machines that it more easily user serviceable.
    I have owned, used or seen closely, many espresso machines, and the BDB is by a very wide margin, the most reliable and user serviceable pump machine I have ever owned or seen. Unless you let it scale up, almost nothing ever goes wrong with it that isn't some kind of user serviceable, non-proprietary seal, whether it's an o-ring or PTFE washer. And on top of that, it's easily user serviceable. Almost none of the seals that eventually wear require any fitting fingers into tight spaces or removing awkward parts to get to them. Everything is straightforward, right in the top of the machine after removing the top cover. Of course, _any_ commercial or prosumer machine, you are into seriously big $$$ if you don't feed it safe water like the coffee shops do their machines. There is no reason the home BDB owner can't do the same. I do. And so I've never had any scale damage, in eight years. And in all that time I've only had one thing go wrong that couldn't be fixed by me, (well, even that could have been). Everything else was routine maintenance. O-rings on the steam boiler, clean the solenoid, flip the steam valve seals, clean the vacuum breaker (rare, but can happen and easy to fix).

    "proprietary" and "not user serviceable" are two very very un earned misnomers about the BDB.

    Plus if cutting edge extraction techniques like super long pre infusions using the built in pump controller aren't enough, it's so easy it's almost a joke, to make into a full authority needle valved profiler, or to plumb it with a nearly silent rotary pump.

    -Peter
    Last edited by pcrussell50; 24th April 2019 at 01:54 PM.
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  33. #5583
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    Hi Everyone

    I'm new to this forum and I'm seeking some guidance.
    I have a Breville BES900 and I'm having pressure issues at the group head.
    I'm lucky to get 1 Bar of pressure, sometimes no pressure at all.
    I have checked the solenoid and it looks brand new on the inside, no build up at all (was serviced and descaled last year).
    I have no leaks and have now tightened the OPV to its tightest setting.
    I have checked all the hoses and they are free of blockages.
    I can here the brew boiler constantly boiling (loud) even 20 minutes after switching the machine off.
    When I turn the hot water on, it just dribbles out.
    I suspect I have a blockage somewhere and not sure of they way to test.

    Any suggestions?

  34. #5584
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    Is the 1bar with a blind filter / rubber disc or with coffee?

  35. #5585
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    Quote Originally Posted by level3ninja View Post
    Is the 1bar with a blind filter / rubber disc or with coffee?
    1 bar with the rubber disc.

  36. #5586
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    Any water entering the drip tray during the shot or only after?

  37. #5587
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    It's possible that water is backflowing under heat and pressure. with the machine warmed up, your boiler gurgling and bubbling as you describe, and the top off, so be careful:

    You want to remove the back covers and move the computer out of your way so you can see and feel the tubes under the main pump (don't confuse it with the steam pump). (Also, this is actually quite easy. All screws are easily accessible). If the tubes on the bottom of the pump are hot, water is backflowing through the pump and it shouldn't be. This would be the good news, because the pump is easy to change and you could do one with a brass neck and do a brass OPV while you're at it.

    There are a couple of other more remote possibilities that would be bad, but I've never heard of them actually happening on these machines.

    -Peter

  38. #5588
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    Quote Originally Posted by pcrussell50 View Post
    It's possible that water is backflowing under heat and pressure. with the machine warmed up, your boiler gurgling and bubbling as you describe, and the top off, so be careful:

    You want to remove the back covers and move the computer out of your way so you can see and feel the tubes under the main pump (don't confuse it with the steam pump). (Also, this is actually quite easy. All screws are easily accessible). If the tubes on the bottom of the pump are hot, water is backflowing through the pump and it shouldn't be. This would be the good news, because the pump is easy to change and you could do one with a brass neck and do a brass OPV while you're at it.

    There are a couple of other more remote possibilities that would be bad, but I've never heard of them actually happening on these machines.

    -Peter
    Hey Peter
    i think you're on the money.
    i tested the main water pump and the water only dribbles out at a very slow pace but the motor is buzzing away. Looks like a new water pump for me.

    Cheers Guys, thanks for your help.

    Pete

  39. #5589
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    Hi Peter, thanks for your responses to my questions here.

    I've seen you make this point a couple of times:

    Quote Originally Posted by pcrussell50 View Post
    Of course, _any_ commercial or prosumer machine, you are into seriously big $$$ if you don't feed it safe water like the coffee shops do their machines. There is no reason the home BDB owner can't do the same. I do.
    I'm wondering how exactly you go about this? Is it economical?

    And thanks everyone else for your responses and ideas

  40. #5590
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    Quote Originally Posted by Therin83 View Post
    Hi Peter, thanks for your responses to my questions here.

    I've seen you make this point a couple of times:



    I'm wondering how exactly you go about this? Is it economical?

    And thanks everyone else for your responses and ideas
    It is an extra element of tedium that you add to your life. But nothing compared to dealing with problems with your machine. Scale is bad business. Once it gets into small places you can never really quite get it all out. Have a think for a minute, why all the expensive machines many BDB users aspire to, don't have a "descaling" function. In their mindset, it would be added complexity to machines that already take plenty of time and expense to keep running. Just because something is made of brass, doesn't mean it won't leak, corrode, scale, need adjustment, get stuck, or need new seals. Everything does. Not just the BDB.

    Your options for zero or no scale water:
    1) distilled/deionised/demineralized water obviously has no Ca or Mg to cause scaling. But it's not safe to use as is over long periods because the water level sensors need some amount of"stuff" in the water in order to conduct their signals, (this goes for any proper espresso machine). But if you add 100mg or so per liter of potassium bicarbonate (you can use sodium bicarbonate too), you will give your machine sensors what they need, and sill have no Ca or Mg to cause scale. Potassium bicarb is used in home beer and wine making. You can get it at stores that sell supplies for that, or else online.

    2) You can get a miniature version of what the shops use: a softening filter system. For home use, these will be smaller than an RO system, and fit under the kitchen sink. In the USA, they are a little over $100 USD for various brands and styles. I use this one: https://www.webstaurantstore.com/3m-...BoCeboQAvD_BwE The filters are expensive, about $50USD every six months, but quick and to change. I almost bought this one: https://www.chriscoffee.com/Water-So...p/softsysg.htm The filters are cheap, but wetter/messier to change. You could also put together this system on your own from bits at your plumbing or large home supply store as it's non proprietary. If you have a favorite coffee shop and they are friendly, ask the manager what they use. It will probably be bigger than what you want, (though not necessarily), but he ought to be able to point you to the restaurant/beverage equipment store they use.

    3) Go to La Marzocco's web site. If you bought a GS/3 or a Linea Mini, they would have resources to guide you to water that is safe for their machines. In the USA, they list some brands of bottled water that are suitable. I would be surprised if they don't do the same for Australia. Which leads me to the part I've been avoiding... It's possible to have _some_ Ca or Mg and be at little or no risk for scale, depending on the pH of the water. Some bottled waters will have some Ca and Mg yet they may still be OK. I do not have the expertise to advise you in that. But there is a "water" sub forum on home-barista.com forums. You could post your water composition there and see what they say.

    Me? We live between two houses. In one, I use the 3M Espresso filter as per number (2). In the other, I mix my own as per number (1). In both cases there is certainty about no Ca or Mg. Doesn't mean you can't be perfectly safe with option (3). Many people are.

    And finally, you may live in an area where the city water is perfectly fine. Shouldn't be too much trouble to send a sample off for testing every now and then for peace of mind, as some cities switch around suppliers from time to time.

    HTH.

    -Peter

  41. #5591
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    Hi - I'm new here. I bought a BDB about 6 months ago and all has been good until some recent issues. I've tried to look through the forum for solutions but couldnt find my issues so thought I'd post and ask for help!
    When the machine is switched off, it is still hot and the boiler for the steam appears to be always on. I'm pretty sure this wasnt always the case and assume its not supposed to be like this? I'm worried this is a) draining electricity and b) probably not good for the machine.
    In case it's relevant, the clip that holds down the water tank flap has come loose so i need to weigh down the flap... I doubt its related but thought i'd better mention it in case.
    Any tips or similar experience would be very helpful!
    Cheers

  42. #5592
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    Hi Folks, I am new to this site. I have had my machine since 2012 and it is in need of a bit of TLC. The machine looks to be leaking from the OPV. Has anyone replaced the plastic OPV or upgraded it to a more robust in a simple DIY manner? I have not tried to remove or look into exactly how it is leaking at this stage I just opened the machine up to see what was going on inside. The fact that it is tripping the earth leakage protection at the house now and then makes me kind of keen to fix the leak.

    Since water has been leaking down onto the pump for a while is there a new pump with brass fitting and brass OPV that I could use and turf the plastic OPV all together? Anyone know what part numbers to look for or a good guide I can follow?
    Last edited by AGP; 30th May 2019 at 02:01 PM.

  43. #5593
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    hey AGP,

    If you do a search for brass OPV in this thread and in the BES920 thread - you'll find what you're looking for. (unlike U2! )

  44. #5594
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    Bump - just wondering whether anyone has any tips or similar experience of the issue above.. essentially even when I switch the machine off (but it’s still plugged in), the milk froth boiler stays on.
    not sure if this is supposed to be the case - I don’t remember it being so before a few weeks ago.
    Thanks
    sac

  45. #5595
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacasable View Post
    Bump - just wondering whether anyone has any tips or similar experience of the issue above.. essentially even when I switch the machine off (but itís still plugged in), the milk froth boiler stays on.
    not sure if this is supposed to be the case - I donít remember it being so before a few weeks ago.
    Thanks
    sac
    Sounds like a problem with the computer. I doubt thereís any fix other than a new board.
    Mine canít remember programmed button times, always stops after a few seconds regardless of the set time. So I always use manual.
    Another problem mine has is that if it is ever switched off at wall or unplugged, when itís turned on again the brew pump will start running and pump out water from brew head. Only way to stop it doing that is to turn it on while holding the 4 buttons in to put it into service mode. From there I can exit and it will behave.
    I asked about it here once before and didnít get any responses.
    My guess is like I said at the outset.
    You could try my trick and turn it on while holding the 4 buttons, then exit the service mode. Maybe from then on the steam boiler might behave...

  46. #5596
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    That points at one of the control triacs ... probably a cheaper initial replacement than the whole micro-controller board.

    If you do a search for "triac" in the 900/920 threads - you might find some posts dealing with it.
    gmeddy likes this.

  47. #5597
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    Quote Originally Posted by inorog View Post
    That points at one of the control triacs ... probably a cheaper initial replacement than the whole micro-controller board.

    If you do a search for "triac" in the 900/920 threads - you might find some posts dealing with it.
    Would that be for my issue or for the one I was replying to? Or both?
    Thanks

  48. #5598
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmeddy View Post
    Would that be for my issue or for the one I was replying to? Or both?
    Thanks
    Nah - that was for @sacasable. You problems sound more like they're controller board related more than anything else. If the behaviour stops by futzing with the control panel buttons - kinda sounds like the controller board has 'issues'.

    Basically - the triacs are the last in line to the heating elements and pumps, and no matter what the control board state is, if they're stuck on or off, they're pretty much stuck. If the behaviour alters because of the control board state - then perhaps the triacs are not at fault, but the micro-controller board itself.

    But I could be wrong.

    The good part is that triacs are easy (enough) to diagnose whether they're good or bad.

  49. #5599
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    Hi everyone. I've had a BDB for 5-6 years now, and it's starting to have problems that require some maintenance.

    The most obvious problem is pressure. When pulling a shot, the pressure is around 2.5 - 3 bar. It's stable and doesn't fluctuate. If I use the silicone blind disc, the pressure is around 4 bar stable.

    The next problem is the pump and pre-extraction. I usually hear a buzz, which I'm sure if the pump, during the pre-extraction phase. But now it's relatively frequent that I don't hear a buzz, or it's much more quiet than usual. I suspect that the pump isn't coming on, but I'm not sure.

    Third problem is the solenoid. I had one episode a couple of weeks ago where it made a loud buzz, but came right after 10 seconds or so. Then one morning last week, I buzzed again and I couldn't get any water flow. That evening I pulled the solenoid apart and soaked the mechanical part in a percarbonate solution for about 15 minutes. It's worked fine since then.

    The last problem is some leaks around the sensors in the steam boiler. When I had the top off for the solenoid issue, I noticed small amounts of water coming out and hitting the top of the boiler. I recognised the hiss it made, which has been happening for a while.

    Questions:

    (1) Based on what I've described, what's the most likely cause of my pressure problems? Is it the pump, solenoid, OPV, or possibly something else? Is there a way I can test?

    (2) Is my solenoid issue likely to come back? If so, do I need to replace the mechanical part or just the electric part?

    (3) I've ordered some silicone 007 and 010 O-rings and will do a general replacement. Are there any that aren't easy to spot, that I might miss?

  50. #5600
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    NZGeek, the pressure problem is likely the pump or the OPV. Assuming your pressure meter is accurate. To test, pull a shot with the blind disc. If you do not see any return water flow from the OPV then its the pump on its last legs. If you see return water, then the OPV needs adjusting or needs to be changed (don't know if the plastic OPV in the Breville is adjustable). If its the pump, I'll probably change the pump and upgrade the OPV to a brass one.

    Changing the O rings are straightforward. All of them are on the top of both the boilers. Except one at pressure meter. Note the size when changing and some of them have double stacked O rings, and some have a small washer which easily falls off. If you have the BES920, then it gets more difficult as there are O rings for the pipes to drain the boilers for descaling, which are obviously located at the bottom of both boilers.



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