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Thread: Work Coffee Machine / Grinder

  1. #1
    Foz
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    Work Coffee Machine / Grinder

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi,

    I am looking for a replacement coffee machine and grinder for my work. I work in the Air Force and caffeine is a major part of our aviation safety philosophy :-)

    We currently have a Breville BES870. It has had an extremely hard life and is now starting to leak like a sieve. It's aobut 3 years old and we go through 2-3 kg of coffee per week, so it's actually done pretty well for a non-commercial machine.

    My boss is hell bent on replacing it with the new dual boiler Breville BES920. He keeps going on about how it has won awards when compared to commercial machines. Can anyone please confirm/deny this? Personally I'm not so keen on it.

    I have a Rancilio Silvia which I have installed a PID on & a Compak K3 Touch at home. I absolutely love it, so naturally my thoughts instantly go to that sort of set up for work.

    Our budget is ~$1000 for Machine & Grinder, but I could probably convince everyone to chip in a bit more if it means getting quality coffee. The BES920 that my boss wants is about $1500 anyway.

    There is scope for plumbing something in, but obviously that will be a bit more work.

    I am open to any and all advice / product suggestions?

    Thanks in advance

    -Foz

  2. #2
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    Hi Foz,

    In a work environment we'd normally recommend a dual boiler or HX machine as these are pretty fool proof. For your budget, have a look at the new dual boiler from Lelit - the PL60,

    charlie

  3. #3
    Foz
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    Thanks for the advice. I think this looks great! Unfortunately, I'm fighting an uphill battle with my Boss over the BES920. I am prepared to admit that I may just be naive/uneducated about the Breville.
    Can anyone with experience with the BES920 please provide me some insight into how it compares to something like the PL 60?
    Keeping in mind that we will be pulling about 30 shots a day on this machine.

  4. #4
    Senior Member noidle22's Avatar
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    Have a read of this thread to give you an idea:
    http://coffeesnobs.com.au/brewing-eq...rs-thread.html

    The 920 is packed full of technology, is fun to use and will make great coffee. However, the Lelit will outlast it with ease and is simpler to operate.
    With the amount of people who will be using the machine and the environment it's in, a rugged and simple machine will be a better option than the 920 I believe.
    coolie21 likes this.

  5. #5
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    Brevilles life span - 2 - 2.5 years.
    Sure, they have a dual boiler and 'specs' which match top end machines, but the parts are rubbish.. I regret buying one and my BES900 has been in for repair 5 times in 2 years... Just buy something decent.
    coolie21 likes this.

  6. #6
    Senior Member noidle22's Avatar
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    Also if you're looking for somewhere to get rid of the 870 to, let me know.

  7. #7
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    +1 DON'T get the Breville.
    The P60 @ $1500 looks a much better buy. If you are really looking to pull ~7500 shots a year thats only 20c a shot and you've paid for the machine (plus coffee).
    Vinitasse likes this.

  8. #8
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Agree with responders above, I'd have the Lelit every day of the week compared to the Breville for the situation you outline...

    Mal.
    Vinitasse likes this.

  9. #9
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    After working in large companies all my career I recently started my own business and one of my first purchases was an Alex Duetto and Kony E - perhaps overkill for an office with just a few staff, but my team love it.

    In less than 3 weeks they've gone from never using a machine to making a pretty decent flat white that's superior to most local cafes - and we're in the middle of Melbourne CBD.

    I've never had a Breville dual boiler, but I now own two E61s (Alex and Giotto) and they're both foolproof and built like tanks.
    Dimal likes this.

  10. #10
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    I have a Breville BES920 and it's an amazing machine for the price. Haven't had any need for servicing, and shouldn't since it's less than a year old. Had a Sylvia previously and I now wonder how I managed with it - so inconsistent, and very difficult to try be consistent. I can't help producing a great coffee almost every time now.
    Don't know about the longevity, time will tell.

  11. #11
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    We`ve got a Sunbeam em6910 at work for 10 people 24hr x 7 days a week (50 total), using a dual floor basket & preground Vittoria for newby makers, with an optional Sunbeam em0480 shimmed grinder & a single floor basket for those that "have to".
    It would be 8 year old, & I have serviced it myself once a year (boil out with a tablet, new group head seal & a new filter).
    It gets flogged. It gets used like it was stolen. It still runs. It has a low level water alarm. It has a low level water alarm.
    The Sunbeam em7000 is better than the em6910 as it has improved design on the previous faults.
    It also has a low level water alarm I had a laugh.

  12. #12
    Senior Member noidle22's Avatar
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    The low water alarm on the EM7000 is the most useless design. Instead of redesigning the sensor magnet to account for the differently shaped water container than was on the EM6910 (wider and shallower), they've just used the same magnet and sensor.
    As a result, the low water alarm goes off when there's still around a litre of water left. How ridiculous. One of many gripes I have with Sunbeam products, but don't tell them i said that hehe.

  13. #13
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    I noticed that on my em7000 at home, you couldn`t run it out of water with the flashing and beeping going on for the next 10 coffees!!! That is a point for redesign, 100% agree. My point was with a machine that get used by many people who will gladly use the last of the paper towel on the roll in the kitchen & walk away, not wash up or wipe benches, they will attempt to run it out of water, but the sunbeam won`t do that quietly. Impossible to be ignorant for that long....

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by noidle22 View Post
    The low water alarm on the EM7000 is the most useless design. Instead of redesigning the sensor magnet to account for the differently shaped water container than was on the EM6910 (wider and shallower), they've just used the same magnet and sensor.
    As a result, the low water alarm goes off when there's still around a litre of water left. How ridiculous. One of many gripes I have with Sunbeam products, but don't tell them i said that hehe.
    G'day noidle

    Agreed. How 'bout they go back to a long thin tank and put the filler in either back corner*. Mine is on a bench but under a fairly standard height cupboard and apart from the "far too early" warning beep system, I have to pull the whole machine out and turn it nearly 180 degrees to refill it because some idiot put the filler in the CENTRE at the back. What were they thinking? Then (of course) picking up the now much heavier "full of water" machine to try to return it to the working position means the wide shallow tank tends to slosh. Easily the 7000's worst fault - and one which the 6910 doesn't have! I keep thinking about a holesaw, a funnel and the cupboard above...

    Just shows that after 60 years of espresso machines the perfect domestic one is still not here yet.

    * Then you would only have to turn it 90 degrees, just like a 6910... Back to the future. Mind you, at least the 7000's warmed basket holders (which occupy the rest of the back) are useful.

    TampIt



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