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Thread: Bes920 pressure wont rise above 3-5 bar with coffee proper pressure with disc

  1. #1
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    Bes920 pressure wont rise above 3-5 bar with coffee proper pressure with disc

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Just got myself a Breville espresso machine. Saw it at DJs with more than 50% off... Couldn't resist the offer.

    Anyway, can anyone shed some light on why the pressure won't go above 3-5 bars when extracting? I am using the Sunbeam E0700 on the 4-5th setting (any smaller it indicates that it is at the Turkish coffee grain size)

    I was using some pretty stale beans from the supermarket though, had them for over a month. Could this be the reason?

    When I insert the silicon disc the pressure goes to around 9- 10ish

  2. #2
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    Just made another cup (didn't drink, poured it right down the drain since its 3 AM)
    It definitely have crema in it (compared to my moka pot) I'm guessing that if it hits 9 bar it would be even more awesome?
    can the quality of the beans influence the pressure? Surely it is just soil mechanics, its not like the beans would expand or contract.

  3. #3
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    Yes it's the beans. You want to use beans that have been roasted between 1 and 3 weeks ago ideally. You might find 4 days to 6 weeks aren't too bad. Supermarket beans age almost always older than this. If the beans you're buying don't have a roast date on them, don't buy them. And I wouldn't worry about the grinder indicating Turkish. Worry about what's in the cup.

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    Supermarket coffee usually has a useby date to indicate when it should be taken off the shelf, not when it is good to drink. It can be up to two years post roast.

    The longer since roasting the finer it should be ground.

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    You'll need to check which of the filter baskets you're using also.
    With old beans and not so fine grind you should be using the pressurised baskets, and of course the opposite is true with fresh well ground and tamped coffee beans.
    level3ninja likes this.

  6. #6
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    So I managed to get some fresh~ish beans today, aaaand the machine choked on the setting I had (since then I have changed to the smart grinder pro with the finest finest setting)

    Played with the settings a bit and is now on the finest setting inside the burr and setting 20 on the display.

    Pressure gets to around 8 ish.

    But the coffee is kinda sour. Is this the bean's problem?


    Edit/ update: If I add in milk, it tastes just like what I get in my usual coffee place. (I'm guessing its the beans that they are using?)
    Last edited by vcb003104; 1st April 2017 at 10:23 AM. Reason: update

  7. #7
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vcb003104 View Post
    Pressure gets to around 8 ish.

    But the coffee is kinda sour. Is this the bean's problem?

    Edit/ update: If I add in milk, it tastes just like what I get in my usual coffee place. (I'm guessing its the beans that they are using?)
    What beans are you using and when were they roasted?

    Pressure should be getting between 8.5-9.5. See if you can adjust the dose / grind / tamp to get that.
    The sourness could be the beans, or it could be the extraction. Only getting to 8 bar sounds to me like it's underextracted, which usually results in sour coffee. What weight of grinds are you using, how long does it the shot take, and how many grams/mls are you getting in the cup?

    Milk will cover up a lot of the shot characteristics, so your coffee could taste the same as your cafe but all the covered up tastes could be very different.

  8. #8
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    I see, I tried grinding 2 clicks finer but not much espresso is coming out (but the pressure goes to around 9.5 ish).

    With the current grind size, I get approx 60 ml of espresso. (I measured 60 ml on a beaker and poured back to my cup to see that it is aprrox the same volume.)

    I have no idea of the weight, I used the razor tool that came with the machine to see if I have the correctish dosage.
    Will try and see what happens when I just do one click finer.

    Gotten the beans from a shop called Cherry Beans Cafe in Ashfield. They seem to be the only cafe that I tried before and is still open today.

    Edit: The beans were roasted on the 22nd or 24th of March I think

  9. #9
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    I think 9.5 is roughly what the over pressure relief valve opens at, so it's probably too fine. The other options to adjust how fast the shot flows are dose and tamp. If you have a small set of digital scales try checking the weight of the grinds you're putting in the basket. If I remember correctly the stock basket doesn't like overdosing. I haven't used the stock baskets for quite a while so I don't remember what I used to use, but I think the double basket can't handle much more than 15g. Also if you're checking with the razor after the tamp, there is a chance you're overdosing and tamping too hard, or underdosing and not tamping very hard. How are you using the razor?

    I'm assuming you're using the double basket? 60mls might be a little too much, I tend to get 50-55mls from 20g, but that is very coffee dependent.

    Those beans sound ok, but long term you might want to look into getting beans direct from a speciality roaster. The bean bay on this site is one such location. If you're getting them from a cafe you're probably paying markup on markup, and it likely won't be as good as what you'll get from a speciality roaster.

    If you're still having trouble finding the sweet spot post a video of your whole coffee making routine which will be a much quicker way of identifying any problems.
    gmeddy likes this.

  10. #10
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    alrighty
    tried to grind less (did 17g according to my kitchen scale, forgot to keep an eye on the grinder so I kinda just kept pushing)
    Pressure went to 8-9 ish (that good or bad?)

    Did not check with razor tool but I'm getting more flavour from the coffee definitely. There's a hint of sweetness? or other things other than the sourness.


    I thought sour = under extract = not enough coffee though.

  11. #11
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
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    Sounds better. Underextracted just means the water moved too fast over the grinds and didn't get enough of the coffee oils out. The speed the water moved through them is inversely proportional to the flow resistance of your puck. The flow resistance is a combination of the dose, grind and tamp. Yes adding more grinds will make it harder for the water to get through, but add too much and you'll run into other problems, like you were. Each basket will have a window of how much it can take. If you need the water to move slower but can't add more grinds, grind the coffee a bit finer. I would suggest trying a 15g dose, and dial the grind level in to get 25-35mls in 25-35s. Experiment and see what for and grind gets you the best coffee for that bean / roast.

    Another thing to keep an eye on is what the pick looks like when you bang it out after extracting. It should come out in one piece, leaving only a few grinds behind. If it's sloppy and wet then you need to increase the dose. If it comes out it bits and is cracked and dry then you need to decrease the dose.

    The best thing to do is keep experimenting and adjust one thing at a time, then change the others to suit it. After trying a few different things see which one brings out the best in the coffee you're using.



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