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Thread: isomac millenium

  1. #1
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    isomac millenium

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    i know i am asking alot of questions, but its a tough decision!!

    anyway, there is one of these (isomac millenium) going at the moment, on an auction place, and just wondering what people knew about them (reliability, servicing etc).
    apparently it is 1yr old, and comes with an isomac inox grinder too.
    what would the warranty be on these things, i am assuming the warranty wouldnt cover me, but what would be my options if i did get it!

    also, what is the inox like?

    thanks for the help,
    daniel.

  2. #2
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    Re: isomac millenium

    If the machine in question is truly in good condition and only 1 year old, $1000 would be a bargain for it and the grinder.
    BUT, who really knows? I know of the auction you speak of and very little information is provided other than standard machine specs.
    At that price, Id guess either the seller doesnt know anything about what theyre selling or there is something wrong with the machine.

    Personally, I wouldnt touch it before seeing it in operation in person (which may be a possibility, ask the seller).

    My view on buying second hand machines blind (ie without having seen them in operation) is that the price should be such that if it doesnt work, you can write it off as bad luck. For me, $1000 is way over that point.

  3. #3
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    Re: isomac millenium

    Daniel,

    the millenium is another semi-commercial espresso machine based on the retro E61 style.

    If it is 1 year old then the new machine warranty is gone because they are usually all guaranteed for 1 year from the date of invoice of the original sale. There are no options in terms of any guarantee on a used machine, unless the individual vendor is offering something that he will back himself without support from the importer.

    "Inox" means stainless steel, and the 2 commonly available isomac grinders ("granmacinino" & "professional") are both equipped with the "usual" generic inards (motor & conical burr assembly) as used by others including unico, lux, iberital etc. *

    The respondent above has just given some very valuable advice but I will add one further point and that is that I NEVER buy a machine sight unseen. If its not tangible, in front of me and able to be demonstrated, then as far as I am concerned, it doesnt exist and is not for sale (to me).

    You have indeed asked a lot of question on differing brand / models...have you asked any of the site sponsors for information on their own models new or second hand? I would assume that anything you buy from one of them even if not guaranteed formally (incase of used equipment), will come with a "peace of mind guarantee" and that is...you should be able to trust a site sponsor to be up front, honest, & supply you with whatever it is that they say they are supplying you without fear of hidden surprises ;)

    Regardz,
    FC.

  4. #4
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    Re: isomac millenium

    i have been in contact with the seller, and she seems happy enough to provide me with some more details (am awaiting some pics of the actual machine/grinder). I will also ask her about viewing it too!.

    in terms of asking sponsors, i was actually going to ask you about the unico splendor. it is a nice looking machine, but i havent managed to find much about price, used sales, or where i can have a look at it in the sydney CDB area. any answers would be great.

    cheers,

  5. #5
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    Re: isomac millenium

    ok, so have been in more contact with the seller, and I am heading there over the weekend, to check it out.
    So, what are the main things that I should be looking out for. If take my beans, and then use the grinder, and wack out a shot, is that enough.

    i guess i should time the volume (30sec for about 30mls yes?).....
    check the burrs on the grinder for wear....
    what else about checking the guage etc.


    also, i know that there are places that run coffee courses (like north ryde tafe) where you can take your own machine. anyone know of any of these that are good?

    wish me luck.....

  6. #6
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    Re: isomac millenium

    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Daniel

    a) check your private messages and

    b) there is no need to take your own beans or anything else over there....just check the operation of the machine to see that it does what it should....which is to deliver hot water through the group, and steam threough the steam pipe. Thats about all you need to know.

    You can then look more closely like to see what the flow of water from the group looks like...if its a soft non descript flow, then shower is clear, and if the flow from the group looks like a series of fine high pressure spurts, then the shower is partially blocked and needs clearing.

    Make coffee & see if there is any leakage of coffee or clear water over the top of the group handle. If there is, do a quick overflow & backflush operation with the blind filter to clear exceess grinds from areound the group seal and try again to make coffee. If there is still a leak over the group handle, the seal might nbeed replacing.

    If it leaks coffee...its just the above.

    If it leaks clear water, then something else up there is leaking.....and it will require further investigation.

    Leave the machine on for a good 20 minutes from first start up or last use, then flow water from the group and see how long it takes to stop spurting overly hot water and settle down to a nice soft flow. It would be considered "normal" to get up to a good cup full of over hot water before it settles down. If it continues to flow overly hot water ad infinitum then it would appear to be a "coffee burner" and may require a bit of judicial tuning by someone in the know. Some models can be tuned successfully, others cant Im afraid.

    See if it has a good delivery of steam.

    See if it has a good delivery of boiling water from the hot water spout. See if the water is clean. If it is discoloured, that will be an expensive or time consuming fix. If it is discoloured and smells bad.....check the smell of the steam coming from the steam pipe. If it smells bad as I saidf, this will be an expensive (but straightforward) little fix for someone and it means that milk or other contaminant has been sucked back into the boiler ( through incorrect management).

    Listen to the pump & see if it sounds quite normal.

    Look at the bodywork and see if it looks nice. If so it is well buiult and assembled. Run your finger along the edges all over the machine and if you dont cut yourself, it has been well finished!. If you cut yourself, it has been badly finished...cheap job.

    The pressure guage should ideally point to 1.1 bars when the pressure stat cuts out. Check this ( and the delay between when it switches on and switches off) by waiting for the element light (somewhere on the front panel of the machine) to go out, and immediately look at the guage to see what number its pointing to at that time.

    You can then check the lag or delay, by opening the steam knob and releasing steam until you see the element light switch back on. At this point look at the gauge again and see what the needle is pointing to when it switched back on. I am assuming this will probably be somewhere around the 0.8 mark and if so then that is also ok and in any case any devuoiation from these figures might only mean
    a) someone has set it up differently to the way I would and
    b) it just need simple readjustment!

    Foir interest sake fiond out if it has a low water (in the reservoir) cut out.

    Find out of the vendor is the original owner and ask to view proof of purchase. This knocks 2 things on the head at once
    a) genuine vendor ( not stolen) and
    b) age of equipment in case what the vendor tells you is different to the paperwork.

    And when all is said and done if after all that you are happy with what you see and the price is fair ( for both of you, vendor and client), thatn thats great.

    If the grinder was new when purchased by your vendor, and it look like the machine & grinder have done little work or are not old...dont worry about whther the grinding plates are worn or not because undoubtedly they will not be (see another topic where I responded in the grinder section about this a few days ago).

    Judging the equipment on the rate of pour of your vendors coffee doesnt tell you anything about the equipment, only if your vendor has a good understanding of how to set up the equipment to work at its best. And you could re adjust it on the spot anyway of you are conversant with what to do.

    Whether you buy that or something else...if you wish to take a lesson (a very good idea) contact another site sponsor John Doyle (aka Pinot) of Coffee Training Centre....banner at left.

    Regardz,
    FC.



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