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Thread: Polishing a tamper base.

  1. #1
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Polishing a tamper base.

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Heres a mod/improvement I made to my stainless steel flat base tamper.
    As supplied there were still minor machining marks on the base.
    Using a solid flat surface (in my case a piece of granite) and wet and dry paper, started with 600 grit, wet the paper and proceeded to lap the base until all machining marks were gone, moved onto 800 grit repeat the process then repeat with 1200.
    Finally give it a quick hit on a cloth buff loaded with stainless buffing compound, brings the base up to a dead flat mirror finish that nothing sticks to, may or may not work any better but it is a very satisfying process and it looks great.
    Sounds complex, but in fact is quite a simple process, a sheet of glass on a table would work just as well as the granite.
    I know, where are the pics? will add later. ;)
    MattyRay likes this.

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    Member Jaso's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    I was once known to do this on my CPU cooler mating interface to get it as flat as possible. It made maybe 2% difference in terms of overclockability so I stopped doing it. You are right when you say though:
    Quote Originally Posted by 023E372F3A5B0 link=1259967195/0#0 date=1259967195
    it looks great.
    ;)

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    A_M
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 745F4D513E0 link=1259967195/1#1 date=1259973970
    I was once known to do this on my CPU cooler mating interface to get it as flat as possible. *It made maybe 2% difference in terms of overclockability so I stopped doing it. *You are right when you say though:
    Quote Originally Posted by 023E372F3A5B0 link=1259967195/0#0 date=1259967195
    it looks great.
    ;)
    If ya have a cheep tamper or the SB one for those with a EM6910... Polishing the rough groves out of the standard base makes a significant difference..

    Some people even let them stand in a pyramid to keep the edges clean..

    Do a search of CS... Some interesting methods to keep tampers happy :D

    I polish the heat sink and teh cpu... *Thus lots less heat sink compound and some significant gains on some systems.. As to temp drops.. *More is not better when it comes to heat sink compound..

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 6E41484A5D624E414E484A424A415B2F0 link=1259967195/2#2 date=1259976057
    Some people even let them stand in a pyramid to keep the edges clean..
    Really!!!!!, thought Id heard it all, obviously not ::)

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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    You can use it as a mirror when the ladies of the house hog the bathroom *;D

    Its a bit hard to do this to my tamper as I have a convex profile base
    But its pretty shiny as it is

    KK

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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1C20293124450 link=1259967195/3#3 date=1259976759
    Quote Originally Posted by 6E41484A5D624E414E484A424A415B2F0 link=1259967195/2#2 date=1259976057
    Some people even let them stand in a pyramid to keep the edges clean..
    Really!!!!!, thought Id heard it all, obviously not ::)
    See here for more light reading and ways to make money..

    http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1220257151/17#17


    My 3 year old tamper really started to perform exceptionally well once I PIDd it. :D ;D :( :o ::)

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    Senior Member trentski's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    I spend a fair bit of time polishing my bits, I find that you need to use a fair bit of elbow grease and fortunately I found a good cheap source on the internet.

    KaleCoAuto - Elbow Grease - click here

    They are mainly an automotive supply site but some items are transferable to maintaining coffee machines and tampers :)


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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 5F594E455F5840422B0 link=1259967195/6#6 date=1259989258
    I spend a fair bit of time polishing my bits, I find that you need to use a fair bit of elbow grease and fortunately I found a good cheap source on the internet.

    KaleCoAuto - Elbow Grease - click here

    They are mainly an automotive supply site but some items are transferable to maintaining coffee machines and tampers :)
    Thanks for the link Trent, think Ill stick to me buff. ;)

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    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 003C352D38590 link=1259967195/0#0 date=1259967195
    Heres a mod/improvement I made to my stainless steel flat base tamper.
    As supplied there were still minor machining marks on the base.
    Using a solid flat surface (in my case a piece of granite) and wet and dry paper, started with 600 grit, wet the paper and proceeded to lap the base until all machining marks were gone, moved onto 800 grit repeat the process then repeat with 1200.
    Finally give it a quick hit on a cloth buff loaded with stainless buffing compound, brings the base up to a dead flat mirror finish that nothing sticks to, may or may not work any better but it is a very satisfying process and it looks great.
    Not required on any of my Pullman bases.... Just checked now and they are already polished to a lovely finish, more satin than mirror finish but nothing ever sticks to them either..... ::) ;)

    Mal.

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 7E53575B563A0 link=1259967195/8#8 date=1260009395
    Quote Originally Posted by 003C352D38590 link=1259967195/0#0 date=1259967195
    Heres a mod/improvement I made to my stainless steel flat base tamper.
    As supplied there were still minor machining marks on the base.
    Using a solid flat surface (in my case a piece of granite) and wet and dry paper, started with 600 grit, wet the paper and proceeded to lap the base until all machining marks were gone, moved onto 800 grit repeat the process then repeat with 1200.
    Finally give it a quick hit on a cloth buff loaded with stainless buffing compound, brings the base up to a dead flat mirror finish that nothing sticks to, may or may not work any better but it is a very satisfying process and it looks great.
    Not required on any of my Pullman bases.... Just checked now and they are already polished to a lovely finish, more satin than mirror finish but nothing ever sticks to them either..... ::) ;)

    Mal.
    Satin means they stopped a little short of the full 9 yards Mal, mirror = perfection. ;D

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    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 516D647C69080 link=1259967195/9#9 date=1260016881
    Satin means they stopped a little short of the full 9 yards Mal, mirror = perfection. ;D
    Each to their own Jon and coming from an engineering background myself, theres a lot to be said for a satin finish over a mirror finish with respect to particles adhering to them.... ;)

    Mal.

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 406D696568040 link=1259967195/10#10 date=1260027244
    Each to their own Jon
    I agree Mal, must be a bit of a bower bird, my preference is for shiny things. ;)

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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 467A736B7E1F0 link=1259967195/7#7 date=1259993166
    Thanks for the link Trent, think Ill stick to me buff. Wink
    Oi !!!...nothin sticks to me ... STOS, I am ;D ;D

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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 754940584D2C0 link=1259967195/9#9 date=1260016881
    Satin means they stopped a little short of the full 9 yards Mal, mirror = perfection. ;D
    Like every aspect of the design of Pullman tampers Jon, the smooth machined finish on our bases is entirely by design, not compromise. As it happens, polishing is actually a simpler and cheaper process than smooth surface machining - you can use cheap and nasty steel, a blunt tool tip and a fast tool speed for the rough machining, then a quick buff with steel wool or a scotch-brite pad and a splash of Brasso and hey presto - polished finish. For a smooth machined finish you need good quality steel, a sharp tool tip, plenty of coolant and a slow tool speed, every one of which is more expensive than the alternative - and if you get one wrong you get a finish with ridges or scuffs or tears or chattering near the centre of the base or other ugly flaws. This pic shows what happens when people try to cut corners on machined finishes, in this case by using too fast a tool speed and cheap steel:


    Pullman base (L), imported product (R)

    The great thing about polishing is that a quick sand and polish can mask any one of those flaws, which makes it a favoured technique for low-end products (almost every tamper <$50 has a polished finish...).

    As your picture shows, polished finishes look fantastic in photos when theyre first done which makes them popular in the showroom - but with a few days of real-world commercial use that mirror finish will soon start to look pretty ordinary - every fingerprint, every scratch, every little scuff which are all part of real-world use, will show up like nobodys business on a mirror finished product.

    Thats why we CHOOSE to take the more expensive path of smooth machining (quite apart from the engineering arguments Mals mentioned...) - our focus is on creating products that are built for the real world, not just for the showroom. Its why we dont make bases out of copper or brass or other materials that readily dent or tarnish, or aluminium for that matter. Its why our aluminium handles are anodised, not powder-coated. Its why I spent months perfecting the weight distribution in the Barista when I could have just gone with the status quo and made a bottom-heavy tamper for a lot less. Its why we favour a fitted tamper over one thats sloppy in the basket. Its why all our timber handles are hand-machined and hand-polished when a lifeless mass production would be quicker and cheaper. Its why our products are more expensive than most others because it costs more to do the job properly.

    I could go on...


    Your product looks great and I dont denigrate the work youve evidently put into it - but its just plain wrong to move from that point to suggesting that manufacturers who choose a machined finish have in some way compromised their quality, when its a far more valid argument to direct at manufacturers who choose a polished finish.

    Greg

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    A_M
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 796C7B796E6B7272737F701E0 link=1259967195/13#13 date=1260226089
    Quote Originally Posted by 754940584D2C0 link=1259967195/9#9 date=1260016881
    Satin means they stopped a little short of the full 9 yards Mal, mirror = perfection. ;D
    Like every aspect of the design of Pullman tampers Jon, the smooth machined finish on our bases is entirely by design, not compromise. As it happens, polishing is actually a simpler and cheaper process than smooth surface machining - you can use cheap and nasty steel, a blunt tool tip and a fast tool speed for the rough machining, then a quick buff with steel wool or a scotch-brite pad and a splash of Brasso and hey presto - polished finish. For a smooth machined finish you need good quality steel, a sharp tool tip, plenty of coolant and a slow tool speed, every one of which is more expensive than the alternative - and if you get one wrong you get a finish with ridges or scuffs or tears or chattering near the centre of the base or other ugly flaws. This pic shows what happens when people try to cut corners on machined finishes, in this case by using too fast a tool speed and cheap steel:


    Pullman base (L), imported product (R)

    The great thing about polishing is that a quick sand and polish can mask any one of those flaws, which makes it a favoured technique for low-end products (almost every tamper <$50 has a polished finish...).

    As your picture shows, polished finishes look fantastic in photos when theyre first done which makes them popular in the showroom - but with a few days of real-world commercial use that mirror finish will soon start to look pretty ordinary - every fingerprint, every scratch, every little scuff which are all part of real-world use, will show up like nobodys business on a mirror finished product.

    Thats why we CHOOSE to take the more expensive path of smooth machining (quite apart from the engineering arguments Mals mentioned...) - our focus is on creating products that are built for the real world, not just for the showroom. Its why we dont make bases out of copper or brass or other materials that readily dent or tarnish, or aluminium for that matter. Its why our aluminium handles are anodised, not powder-coated. Its why I spent months perfecting the weight distribution in the Barista when I could have just gone with the status quo and made a bottom-heavy tamper for a lot less. Its why we favour a fitted tamper over one thats sloppy in the basket. Its why all our timber handles are hand-machined and hand-polished when a lifeless mass production would be quicker and cheaper. Its why our products are more expensive than most others because it costs more to do the job properly.

    I could go on...


    Your product looks great and I dont denigrate the work youve evidently put into it - but its just plain wrong to move from that point to suggesting that manufacturers who choose a machined finish have in some way compromised their quality, when its a far more valid argument to direct at manufacturers who choose a polished finish.

    Greg
    Well put Greg...

    I first scanned the post and then thought... They are funny looking roughness gauges.. new style are hi tec, but in the old days.. we had a QA block at a rated roughness and a fingernail..

    Then had to go back and read ya post..

    As I have stated previously... In many cases we may use general type terms to make it easer for every one.... However some of teh finer points / detail may not be covered or correct..

    Polished is one of those terms.. As a*Machinist (all be it a few years ago)... Polished and Mirror does not mean what many (large majority) expect it to......

    That is why from a QA point it has to be measured... Such that you can state and compare..

    Keep up teh great work..

    PS. What is ya roughness reading ???

  16. #16
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 485D4A485F5A4343424E412F0 link=1259967195/13#13 date=1260226089
    Quote Originally Posted by 754940584D2C0 link=1259967195/9#9 date=1260016881
    Satin means they stopped a little short of the full 9 yards Mal, mirror = perfection. ;D
    Like every aspect of the design of Pullman tampers Jon, the smooth machined finish on our bases is entirely by design, not compromise. As it happens, polishing is actually a simpler and cheaper process than smooth surface machining - you can use cheap and nasty steel, a blunt tool tip and a fast tool speed for the rough machining, then a quick buff with steel wool or a scotch-brite pad and a splash of Brasso and hey presto - polished finish. For a smooth machined finish you need good quality steel, a sharp tool tip, plenty of coolant and a slow tool speed, every one of which is more expensive than the alternative - and if you get one wrong you get a finish with ridges or scuffs or tears or chattering near the centre of the base or other ugly flaws. This pic shows what happens when people try to cut corners on machined finishes, in this case by using too fast a tool speed and cheap steel:


    Pullman base (L), imported product (R)

    The great thing about polishing is that a quick sand and polish can mask any one of those flaws, which makes it a favoured technique for low-end products (almost every tamper <$50 has a polished finish...).

    As your picture shows, polished finishes look fantastic in photos when theyre first done which makes them popular in the showroom - but with a few days of real-world commercial use that mirror finish will soon start to look pretty ordinary - every fingerprint, every scratch, every little scuff which are all part of real-world use, will show up like nobodys business on a mirror finished product.

    Thats why we CHOOSE to take the more expensive path of smooth machining (quite apart from the engineering arguments Mals mentioned...) - our focus is on creating products that are built for the real world, not just for the showroom. Its why we dont make bases out of copper or brass or other materials that readily dent or tarnish, or aluminium for that matter. Its why our aluminium handles are anodised, not powder-coated. Its why I spent months perfecting the weight distribution in the Barista when I could have just gone with the status quo and made a bottom-heavy tamper for a lot less. Its why we favour a fitted tamper over one thats sloppy in the basket. Its why all our timber handles are hand-machined and hand-polished when a lifeless mass production would be quicker and cheaper. Its why our products are more expensive than most others because it costs more to do the job properly.

    I could go on...


    Your product looks great and I dont denigrate the work youve evidently put into it - but its just plain wrong to move from that point to suggesting that manufacturers who choose a machined finish have in some way compromised their quality, when its a far more valid argument to direct at manufacturers who choose a polished finish.

    Greg
    Think you may have taken me a bit too literally Greg, my statement (Satin means they stopped a little short of the full 9 yards) was a light hearted jibe, you will note I deliberately made no reference to brand names, as I stated in a later post my personal preference is for polished (I like shiny things) I have no trouble maintaining the finish as I have a buffer with 8 inch cloth buff, mind you its over 18 months since I originally polished it and only gave it a quick hit for the benefit of the photo, and I can assure you absolutely nothing sticks to it.
    As I said in my post, Ive had both satin and polished, my preference is for polished, the reasons for my personal preferences are, I like the feel when tamping - smooth as silk, I like the finish it imparts to the coffee - nothing sticks to it - and of course I certainly like the appearance. ;D
    As I said these preferences are personal and were in no way meant to belittle the choices of others.
    To each his own. :)

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    A_M
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 7B474E5643220 link=1259967195/15#15 date=1260227589
    Think you may have taken me a bit too literally
    This issue here is that posts are public and other read (often only parts) and then draw their own conclusion = often *wrong * ;)

    I think Greg P was attempting to add detail as to the fact that polished and shiny does not = smooth / level of roughness. *

    See my post above.....

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    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    OK, Im wondering why people on this forum take things so personally and get so pedantic about their opinions?
    This thread is a good example, my original post was simply explaining a process I felt offered me a benefit (and I still do) but suddenly the whole thing has turned serious with lengthy explanations as to why I am mistaken and dont really know what Im on about.
    In the final analysis as others have mentioned in another thread, I think the importance of tamping is probably over played, sure its all part of the espresso ritual, and a nice tamper machined or polished is a joy to use.
    Why oh why is there this culture of having to be seen to be right, is it a bloke/testosterone thing, cant we simply accept the fact that others may have opinions that differ from our own? :-/

  19. #19
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 210E0705122D010E0107050D050E14600 link=1259967195/16#16 date=1260227856
    Quote Originally Posted by 7B474E5643220 link=1259967195/15#15 date=1260227589
    Think you may have taken me a bit too literally
    This issue here is that posts are public and other read (often only parts) and then draw their own conclusion = often *wrong * ;)

    I think Greg P was attempting to add detail as to the fact that polished and shiny does not = smooth / level of roughness. *

    See my post above.....
    Quote Originally Posted by 210E0705122D010E0107050D050E14600 link=1259967195/16#16 date=1260227856
    This issue here is
    So now we have an issue! all from a post made in good faith, Im starting to wonder about the wisdom of expressing opinions or offering advice around here, far more is read into them than was the original intention, perhaps the old saying about being seen but not heard has some merit. ;)

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    A_M
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 7A464F5742230 link=1259967195/18#18 date=1260229549
    perhaps the old saying about being seen but not heard has some merit. *
    Not at all... By speaking up.. You speak for all those lurkers or those that do know or have the Confidence to post..

    My comments as to the issue... Was not direct at you.... It was highlighting a fact..


    Im starting to wonder about the wisdom of expressing opinions or offering advice around here, far more is read into them than was the original intention
    Very true as to *the highlighted section.. *That is why; one sometimes has to look at what ya saying, as it is not a one on one chat...

    So many times, when I go to get parts etc.. *I am reminded by the service people that when equipment is in for repair; the owners say they have read on Coffeesnobs how to fix / mod / and do lots of things to their coffee appliances..

    It is clear; that they have read a post or two and not researched correctly and then stuffed their warranty or made their machine un safe..

    I am happy to be corrected at any stage.. Mal / KK / Andy / 2mcm and many others have shown me the errors of my ways and I have learnt and picked up many great things.. * When I see good outcomes I will attempt to add praise (not mayonnaise) for teh poster......

    But all to often... People assume that every one is at the same level of understanding... *And are on teh same page.. *We are NOT.

    Why oh why is there this culture of having to be seen to be right, is it a bloke/testosterone thing, cant we simply accept the fact that others may have opinions that differ from our own?
    As to how to tamp and roast etc fully concur and wipe to steam tip or where to store ya tamper etc.. But were the wrong technical info is promoted or it is dangerous.. THEN.....

    I still see dangerous practices being done and promoted every day... *Not just here but every where technology and electricity is used.. Woodworking forums etc

    If I have offended you.. Then that was not my intent... But I do not retract what I have posted in the contect that it was intended... *ie. Education and clearing up a point of misinterpretation.

    PS. *Keep ya posts coming.. Its also the post and the debate and the rigor that keeps CS alive and a real source of data and info... Not just a marketing tool *;D (opps ... na its OK... Andy will not read this)... *;D




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    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 417D746C79180 link=1259967195/18#18 date=1260229549
    So now we have an issue!
    Whoa! Never underestimate the potential to be misinterpreted on online forums. Written communication cant convey tone and body language.

    Perhaps Greg inferred your meaning but saw an opportunity to add some detail (as AM suggested).

    Quote Originally Posted by 417D746C79180 link=1259967195/17#17 date=1260228995
    OK, Im wondering why people on this forum take things so personally and get so pedantic about their opinions?
    I hope you appreciate the irony in this statement Jon.

    Indulge my patronism by accepting the advice that there are several ways to interpret a comment that you think may be at your expense:

    1. Acknowledge it and respond positively.
    2. Ask for explanation (by PM is best)
    3. Ignore it
    4. React to it

    Option 1 is good even if the writers sarcasm or invective is clear. Its the equivalent of "love your enemy; itll drive them nuts"

    Option 2 is the preferred way to clear up a misunderstanding.

    Option 3 can be considered impolite if the writers intent wasnt bad.

    Option 4 can make for good spectator sport but usually someone gets hurt.

    I enjoy your contributions, Jon.

  22. #22
    Senior Member Koffee_Kosmo's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Jon
    Remember this quote

    Water of a ducks back
    Its a apt quote for the reason that nothing sticks to it

    Tomorrow is another day ;)

    I enjoy your contributions as well

    KK

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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 003C352D38590 link=1259967195/9#9 date=1260016881
    Not required on any of my Pullman bases.... Just checked now and they are already polished to a lovely finish, more satin than mirror finish but nothing ever sticks to them either..... Roll Eyes Wink

    Mal.

    Satin means they stopped a little short of the full 9 yards Mal, mirror = perfection. Grin

    Quote Originally Posted by 3B070E1603620 link=1259967195/15#15 date=1260227589
    Think you may have taken me a bit too literally Greg, my statement (Satin means they stopped a little short of the full 9 yards) was a light hearted jibe, you will note I deliberately made no reference to brand names, as I stated in a later post my personal preference is for polished (I like shiny things) I have no trouble maintaining the finish as I have a buffer with 8 inch cloth buff, mind you its over 18 months since I originally polished it and only gave it a quick hit for the benefit of the photo, and I can assure you absolutely nothing sticks to it.
    As I said in my post, Ive had both satin and polished, my preference is for polished, the reasons for my personal preferences are, I like the feel when tamping - smooth as silk, I like the finish it imparts to the coffee - nothing sticks to it - and of course I certainly like the appearance. Grin
    As I said these preferences are personal and were in no way meant to belittle the choices of others.
    To each his own. Smiley *
    No worries Jon,

    Your comment read to me as an absolute statement satin = compromise but mirror = perfection, not I personally like the mirror finish but there may be good reasons why others prefer satin. Ill take you at your word if that wasnt your intent. As AM mentioned, in a public forum like this others may come along and read your comment and go away believing in their naivety that if a product has a machined surface its inferior to a mirror finish. So I felt the need to put forward the other side of the argument, especially as the context of your comment was a post which mentioned the finish on our products.

    I certainly wasnt having a go at any personal preference you may have for mirror finished surfaces, obviously thats a personal choice and you clearly have the wherewithal to maintain the surfaces in excellent condition. But without others appreciating the other side of the argument they may be sorely disappointed when they find their mirror finished base scratches up after a weeks use and wonder why it was ever recommended.

    Keep up the robust discussion Jon, we dont want to lose that from CS at all ;) But its always a fine line to tread if its not clear whats intended to be a personal preference and whats intended as a statement of fact.

    Hope that expresses my opinion clearly and without confusion! *;D

    Greg

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    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Off
    Quote Originally Posted by 5E7A737370704A5E7A66787A150 link=1259967195/21#21 date=1260232994
    Water of a ducks back *
    Reply just to make a quick off-topic congratulations on reaching 3K posts, KK. Youre 60% of the way towards getting a "Sleep is over-rated" designation.

  25. #25
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    :P

    So will we call him KKK now?

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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Well he does has quite a "Klan" of followers with his KKTO :-?hmmmmmmm

  27. #27
    Senior Member Koffee_Kosmo's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 407C617A707166737B70140 link=1259967195/24#24 date=1260241447
    :P

    So will we call him KKK now?
    Quote Originally Posted by 43476178787D62757A140 link=1259967195/25#25 date=1260249904
    Well he does have quite a "Klan" of followers with his KKTO :-?hmmmmmmm

    I will just take the money
    K is an acronym for thousand

    We are quick witted today * ;)
    Thanks lads

    KK(K)

  28. #28
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Well its KKKIII now.

    6 more posts and you can get your KKKIX

  29. #29
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 76595052457A56595650525A525943370 link=1259967195/19#19 date=1260230651
    As to how to tamp and roast etc fully concur and wipe to steam tip or where to store ya tamper etc..But were the wrong technical info is promoted or it is dangerous.. THEN.....

    I still see dangerous practices being done and promoted every day...Not just here but every where technology and electricity is used.. Woodworking forums etc *
    No argument from me on this point AM, I shudder when people start offering advice on 240 V equipment when its obvious they dont *have a clue, my opinion is posts of this nature should be moderated into the bin.
    Quote Originally Posted by 76595052457A56595650525A525943370 link=1259967195/19#19 date=1260230651
    If I have offended you.. Then that was not my intent
    No offence taken. :)

  30. #30
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Evening Greg, I did post this early on in response to a comment by Mal,

    (I agree Mal, must be a bit of a bower bird, my preference is for shiny things. Wink])

    As I explained in my first post in the thread, my tamper (purchased 8 years ago) came with a machined base, I chose to polish it and liked the result so thought the method I used was worthy of an explanation.
    Thanks for explaining your design and manufacturing processes, its obvious you put a lot of time and thought into your products and are justifiably proud of them.
    Quote Originally Posted by 5441565443465F
    5F5E525D330 link=1259967195/22#22 date=1260234321
    Keep up the robust discussion Jon
    You can count on that. ;D

    Cheers,

    Jon.

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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 547079797A7A4054706C72701F0 link=1259967195/21#21 date=1260232994

    Water of a ducks back
    Its a apt quote for the reason that nothing sticks to it



    KK
    Much like a polished tamper base ;)

  32. #32
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 67606A66090 link=1259967195/30#30 date=1260331406
    Quote Originally Posted by 547079797A7A4054706C72701F0 link=1259967195/21#21 date=1260232994

    Water of a ducks back
    Its a apt quote for the reason that nothing sticks to it



    KK
    Much like a polished tamper base ;)
    Youve nailed it Nico. ;D

  33. #33
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 4D71786075140 link=1259967195/17#17 date=1260228995
    Why oh why is there this culture of having to be seen to be right, is it a bloke/testosterone thing, cant we simply accept the fact that others may have opinions that differ from our own? :-/ *
    When its just to do with ones personal opinion, no-one is going to have a go at you for that but they might argue the point with you if they believe the foundation of your opinion is flawed in some way. Nothing wrong with that, in my opinion, its one of the great ways in which we learn from others.

    However, when it comes to the possibility of technological facts being incorrectly assumed or quoted and possibly cradled under the guise of personal opinion, whether intended or not, it behoves on the technically qualified of those among us, to ensure that any erroneous factual data is corrected and put into context. A lot of what we do here is based upon technology in its many forms and given that a lot of CSers and other people may read posts containing technological references, perhaps bracketed within ones personal opinion about something, it is important that any such errors, when observed, are corrected. It is hoped that by doing this, incorrect data isnt propagated and therefore, eventually become the accepted norm.... Something that the internet is well known for unfortunately.

    We here at CS are just trying to do our little bit to ensure that accurate information is provided where ever possible at the same time as promoting this wonderful world of great coffee that we all enjoy and benefit from.

    Hope this provides some perspective Jon.... :)

    Mal.

  34. #34
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Re: Polishing a tamper base.

    Quote Originally Posted by 5E73777B761A0 link=1259967195/32#32 date=1260347659
    Hope this provides some perspective Jon....
    It certainly does. ::)

  35. #35
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Heres a mod/improvement I made to my stainless steel flat base tamper.
    As supplied there were still minor machining marks on the base.
    Using a solid flat surface (in my case a piece of granite) and wet and dry paper, started with 600 grit, wet the paper and proceeded to lap the base until all machining marks were gone, moved onto 800 grit repeat the process then repeat with 1200.
    Finally give it a quick hit on a cloth buff loaded with stainless buffing compound, brings the base up to a dead flat mirror finish that nothing sticks to, may or may not work any better but it is a very satisfying process and it looks great.
    Sounds complex, but in fact is quite a simple process, a sheet of glass on a table would work just as well as the granite.
    I know, where are the pics? will add later.
    Been looking through the archives, this thread from 3.5 years ago jogged the memory.

    I'm still using my much loved Reg Barber tamper with it's highly polished base.

    Approaching 4 years of use the mirror finish on the base remains blemish free (have not touched it since the original polish) and is a delight to use, absolutely nothing sticks to it and the tamping process is so smooooth.

  36. #36
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    smooooth as...satin?

  37. #37
    Member thundering_gerkins's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Been looking through the archives, this thread from 3.5 years ago jogged the memory.

    I'm still using my much loved Reg Barber tamper with it's highly polished base.

    Approaching 4 years of use the mirror finish on the base remains blemish free (have not touched it since the original polish) and is a delight to use, absolutely nothing sticks to it and the tamping process is so smooooth.
    Glad to see after 3.5 years, that the mirror polished "Devils" tamper didn't bring an end to all mankind

  38. #38
    Doppio Ristretto
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    Wow. what a thread.

    bit of a Hornet's nest back there.

    FWIW I chose a Brass tamper base for my Reg Barber. I would have preferred a pure copper one, however I could not locate one. Nonetheless, when I can find suitable stock for machining one, I'll get around to it.

    Reasoning: copper & brass have far better antimicrobial properties than stainless steel. Given a tamper's usage, storage and exposure to products used in food preparation I find some personal satisfaction in using this particular material. In my own personal opinion I also much prefer the weight, lustre, colour and feel of copper and brass to that of 316s/s

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeB View Post
    Reasoning: copper & brass have far better antimicrobial properties than stainless steel. Given a tamper's usage, storage and exposure to products used in food preparation
    Sadly, not true. Perhaps in solution/nanoparticle form one metal is more anti microbial than another, but this doesn't mean a lump of silver/copper/ brass/unobtainium has any of these properties whatsoever. That bit is pure magic.

    If you really, really have to worry about the cleanliness of your tamper, the hardest, smoothest surface would be the best.
    Dragunov21 likes this.

  40. #40
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by habahabanero View Post
    If you really, really have to worry about the cleanliness of your tamper, the hardest, smoothest surface would be the best.
    Highly polished stainless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Yelta View Post
    Highly polished stainless.
    ...or Tungsten Carbide with a Titanium Nitride coating ..?
    ..( Heavy, hard, highly polished, low friction, and a very nice gold colour ! )
    TiN-LT_1.jpg

  42. #42
    Doppio Ristretto
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    Quote Originally Posted by habahabanero View Post
    Sadly, not true. Perhaps in solution/nanoparticle form one metal is more anti microbial than another, but this doesn't mean a lump of silver/copper/ brass/unobtainium has any of these properties whatsoever. That bit is pure magic.

    If you really, really have to worry about the cleanliness of your tamper, the hardest, smoothest surface would be the best.
    Have a read of this. It's not the only scientific publication, I'm just providing this as an example for you.
    http://www.eurocopper.org/doc/upload...-bacterial.pdf

  43. #43
    Senior Member Dragunov21's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeB View Post
    Have a read of this. It's not the only scientific publication, I'm just providing this as an example for you.
    http://www.eurocopper.org/doc/upload...-bacterial.pdf
    Given that coffee preparation doesn't involve any high-risk vectors for E. Coli and the bacteria dies at a little over 70C (ie well below brew temperature), that article doesn't provide support to a claim of copper tampers providing any tangible benefit.

    What is it you believe it helps protect against?

  44. #44
    Senior Member Vinitasse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by blend52 View Post
    ...or Tungsten Carbide with a Titanium Nitride coating ..?
    ..( Heavy, hard, highly polished, low friction, and a very nice gold colour ! )
    Just wondering... is Tungsten Carbide with a Titanium Nitride coating certified as being food safe?

  45. #45
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dragunov21 View Post
    Given that coffee preparation doesn't involve any high-risk vectors for E. Coli and the bacteria dies at a little over 70C (ie well below brew temperature), that article doesn't provide support to a claim of copper tampers providing any tangible benefit.

    What is it you believe it helps protect against?
    If you hang it around your neck on a leather thong, arthritis.
    Dragunov21 likes this.

  46. #46
    Senior Member Journeyman's Avatar
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    Does polishing your tamper (SOOO tempting to say polishing your knob, but won't ) make a difference to the coffee quality?I guess the question is really, does a smoother surface make a change in how the water soaks the puck?

    I'm a bit puzzled as I would think the twist given the tamper at the end of the press would smooth it out anyway.

    I have noticed a difference since I started pressing, then relieving the pressure and THEN twisting - I used to sometimes get grounds on the surface of the tamper but now it comes away clean every time. I was reading this thread and it occurs to me that the twist means only rotary grooves in the tamper surface could have any effect - anything radial will 'polish' off the puck as the tamper twists.

    Sorry if the explanation is long-winded - I hadn't even thought about tamper surfaces before I read this - I thought the choices were flat, concave and convex...

  47. #47
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Journeyman View Post
    Does polishing your tamper make a difference to the coffee quality?I guess the question is really, does a smoother surface make a change in how the water soaks the puck?
    Not the slightest Journeyman, the only advantages are aesthetic i.e. nice to look at, easy to clean, very smooth when polishing.

    It's a personal thing, polish, don't polish, at the end of the day it really doesn't matter.

  48. #48
    Not a Shoe Jimmytheboot's Avatar
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    Its not just aesthetic, my concept art tamper liked to pick up chunks of my puck when lifting off after tamping. Hasnt happened since using some 400grit for 10 minutes, it originally looked like pullmans "imported" example.

  49. #49
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmytheboot View Post
    Its not just aesthetic, my concept art tamper liked to pick up chunks of my puck when lifting off after tamping. Hasnt happened since using some 400grit for 10 minutes, it originally looked like pullmans "imported" example.
    So there ya go, sometimes function does follow form.

    As a matter of interest how was the base of your Concept Art tamper finished?

  50. #50
    Not a Shoe Jimmytheboot's Avatar
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    Behmor Brazen - $249 - Free Freight
    Like the one on the Right, maybe a touch deeper with more spaced grooves

    Quote Originally Posted by gregpullman

    Pullman base (L), imported product (R)



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