Results 1 to 8 of 8
Like Tree13Likes
  • 1 Post By Rolf
  • 1 Post By Rolf
  • 4 Post By Dimal
  • 4 Post By level3ninja
  • 2 Post By LeroyC
  • 1 Post By CafeLotta

Thread: What if you knew then what you know now

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    19

    What if you knew then what you know now

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Team,

    i have a question for all you veteran home baristas. If you were a beginner now but knew what you know from all your experiences with the different machines and equipment you,ve had, what equipment would you recomend now to a beginner? What would you buy and why? Would you look to get sorted straight away or would you get something simple and progress? Letís say the budget is 2500.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sweden/Germany
    Posts
    140
    if it would be in that way, I would start with a Izzo Duetto or an Astoria Perla, but I would have not the fun of my experiences, so it is good in the way it happens.
    Milkshake likes this.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    Perth, Australia
    Posts
    19
    So you are saying the learning and experimenting is half the fun then?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sweden/Germany
    Posts
    140
    Quote Originally Posted by Milkshake View Post
    So you are saying the learning and experimenting is half the fun then?
    yes, at least for me.
    Dimal likes this.

  5. #5
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    16,597
    A great grinder is essential by what ever measure one uses and in my case, I'd be heading for either a spring or manual lever...

    Mal.
    P.S.
    While I would have selected a Spring Lever machine years ago, I would probably have killed myself with one after I lost the strength and dexterity of my hands and arms...
    Last edited by Dimal; 29th September 2018 at 10:15 PM.
    kwantfm, Paolo, DaveD and 1 others like this.

  6. #6
    Senior Member level3ninja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,274
    I'd say spend half your budget on the grinder and don't cheap out on beans. If it isn't in the beans to start with no equipment can put it there. If it isn't ground well no machine can change that. These are your two biggest limiting factors. I would say don't try and skip the machine upgrade in a year or three with your first purchase. Buy a second hand Silvia or something and spend some time learning the basics. By the time you've mastered that and want to upgrade you'll have a better idea of what features you'd like in a machine and actually be able to use it more to its potential.

    I spent a few years using crap beans and a Breville Smart Grinder. I honestly think my learning time could have been cut down by 50% had those not been the case. Still needed to do my time in the trenches as it were, I just think it could have been 1-2 years instead of 4. The first 2 years were languished on poor beans. The real learning began only after that, then every hardware upgrade to now has unearthed more room for improvements in my technique. I feel if I had better feedback earlier on poor techniques would not have become bad habits so readily.
    Nevertheless here I am, caffeinated as ever.
    Dimal, simonsk8r, Rolf and 1 others like this.

  7. #7
    Senior Member LeroyC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Woodend, New Zealand
    Posts
    2,199
    It depends really. If you enjoy learning as you go and working things out for yourself I wouldnít change much. Iíd just make sure I knew I was about to get a new hobby and go down the rabbit hole.
    However if you wanted a pleasant experience and an easy entry into making coffee at home I would start with user friendly machines so that you can concentrate on learning to make coffee without the frustration of learning the quirks of a difficult machine. Something like a Sunbeam EM7000, Breville BES920, Lelit PL41**, or NS Oscar II and a reasonable doserless grinder. A small conical burr grinder is fine as long as itís a good one like the Lelit William, but a basic small flat burr grinder like a Compak K3T isnít expensive so is even better.
    More important than the equipment though is the advice and training you might get as well as the accessories youíd want. And knowing the importance of using good quality coffee that freshly roasted. Spending some time at one or two retailers trying out a couple of machines is a great idea and getting some training once youíve bought a machine would also be highly recommended.
    level3ninja and Milkshake like this.

  8. #8
    Senior Member CafeLotta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic, Aust.
    Posts
    971
    All depends on the usage requirements you have. If I were to do it over, these days for around $2500 I'd look at an ECM Classika PID and a Compak K3 package deal. Aside from the initial learning curve of grind settings, dosing and tamping, I personally believe the biggest issue people have when starting out is keeping brew temperature under control. If I had started out with these 2 pieces of equipment I'd still be happily using them today without wasting money on upgrading from an overpriced (these days) Silvia still with no factory PID. I happily continue to use a Compak K3 which I have owned for a few years.
    Last edited by CafeLotta; 30th September 2018 at 04:42 PM.
    Milkshake likes this.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •