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Thread: ECM Giotto Premium old-vs-new wiring spec

  1. #1
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    ECM Giotto Premium old-vs-new wiring spec

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Hi all,

    I'm wondering if someone can explain to me the difference in the "old" (I've heard pre-2010?) wiring and the "new" wiring for the Giotto Premium?

    Backround is my controller died, I'm replacing it with my own build, but I'm wondering if I should change the wiring in the process.

    I've found this link with some wiring diagrams: https://www.home-barista.com/downloa...E-13.03.09.pdf

    The difference I can see is that the old wiring runs the thermo cut-off ==> pressurestat ==> element; but the new wiring runs thermo cut-off ==> element; and the pressurestat is a separate (low voltage DC) input into the controller.

    The new wiring also uses a "loop wire" to replace an input, but I'm not sure which one (it's not labelled).

    My machine seems to have the "new" wiring as the pressurestat is wired directly to the controller and it's not inline with the element. Is there anything else I should consider rewiring/changing?

    thanks

  2. #2
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    I'm new to this myself, but from what I have read in the last couple of days (got an old Giotto on the way!), the P-stat wired to the controller is the older version. The issue these had were that the P-stat is wired to the controller which triggers a relay, so the constant on-off-on-off of the P-stat wears out the relay very quickly.

    The newer wiring spec with the P-stat in line with the heating element avoids this by directly switching the heating element on and off

  3. #3
    Senior Member Jackster's Avatar
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    Either one should get a SSR as a upgrade, to take the load off the relays

    My only decision is, to leave the old relay connected, so I can hear the click clicking to indicate the SSR/element is turning on and off.
    I think I should leave it connected, but un-utilized

  4. #4
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    Thanks harrison6987, that's the only explanation I've had so far!

    Well mine has done 12 years and only just died, so I'm not too concerned about burning out the relay! It may be an exception though. Certainly not the "time bomb" I've had explained in the past.

    You could always replace the relay with a plug-in relay so you can still hear the click but also replace it easily. Or as mentioned an SSR (which is my project rn). But then you need a different controller, and temp probe to do it justice...

    Anyway thanks for the comments.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Lyrebird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jackster View Post
    Either one should get a SSR as a upgrade, to take the load off the relays

    My only decision is, to leave the old relay connected, so I can hear the click clicking to indicate the SSR/element is turning on and off.
    I think I should leave it connected, but un-utilized
    I just wire an LED (with dropper) in parallel with the SSR drive. I use red for the heater (yellow for level and either green or blue for on)
    Dimal likes this.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by iaindb View Post
    Thanks harrison6987, that's the only explanation I've had so far!

    Well mine has done 12 years and only just died, so I'm not too concerned about burning out the relay! It may be an exception though. Certainly not the "time bomb" I've had explained in the past.

    You could always replace the relay with a plug-in relay so you can still hear the click but also replace it easily. Or as mentioned an SSR (which is my project rn). But then you need a different controller, and temp probe to do it justice...

    Anyway thanks for the comments.
    That's pretty good if it's done 12 years. I've just been fixing up a La Nuova Caudra - opened up the control box and replaced both the transformer and relay (turns out the transformer was the culprit). Anyhow it was an easy solder job since they were just through hole components



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