Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    5

    Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    This is my first post to Coffee Snobs having taken up roasting early last year to feed my coffee addiction while living in a remote town with no coffee shop - let alone roasters!

    I am interested to know if anyone else has tried roasting the Ethiopia Sidamo Guji which was on the November Beanbay.

    I have just done my first roast to SC and have been surprised with the taste of the brew. Its almost sour/fermented, which surprised me as the fresh roast smelt of chocolate/ caramel. The beans have sat for 3-4 days.

    The flavour/ smell isnt offensive, just very different to my previous roasts. (I had been practising on the Brazil Daterra from Pioneer Roastery which is a very different smell/ taste).

    Interested to know how others have found it. Perhaps I overoasted? Or perhaps this bean is best used in a blend?

    Looking forward to hearing any responses. :)


  2. #2
    Senior Member GregJW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Armidale, NSW
    Posts
    618

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    Hi Libby and welcome to CS.

    My roasts of this bean (from Nov Bean Bay) also resulted in a "sour/fermented" taste. I tried a few different roast styles, same result. So, sorry - no cure from me.

    I didnt like it at all, although a few other people who tasted it thought it was very distinctive and nice. Ive put the rest of my Sidamo to the bottom/back of my pile of green beans and may pull it out at a later stage to try again. Or maybe not - this has been my least favourite bean ever.

    Greg

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    48

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    Hi Libby,

    I roasted this in my popper and brewed it in my Sunbeam drip filter machine. I found it to be quite a nice full bodied coffee prepared that way. I dont remember any sour or fermented taste. I will be roasting some to try in my Silvia soon and will let you know how that goes. But Im a bit of a pushover when it comes to coffee, My palate is not what you would call educated. ;)

    Cheers,
    Brian

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    5

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    Greg - good to know it wasnt just me! I think Ill try blending it with some other beans later on.

    Brian - Good to hear youve had a good result. As long as you enjoyed it. Thats the main thing!

    Libby

  5. #5
    Senior Member Stan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Just North of Brisbane
    Posts
    945

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    I have roasted this bean twice. My first roast was very ordinary but drinkable. I found it needed a slow ramp to First crack and I did pulled in at the first crack of Second Crack a total roast time of 19 minutes and I found the smell from the beans a bit sour but the taste was slightly herbal with a choc aftertaste, It had an acid feel in the mouth but a very pleasant aftertaste. Try different roast profiles with it it is worth it if you get it right. This bean also has to rest at least 5-7 days after the roast it is definitely not at its best inside that time.

    I use a corretto and had the heat gun way back when I started the roast and after the initial heat up kept it at between 8-10 deg rise per minute. :)

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    721

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    Ive just tasted my first roast of this bean after a 9 day rest. I roasted it to SC and pulled it before it hit Rolling SC.

    I was very surprised at the results, wasnt too sure what to expect at first but I might just have found my no.2 favourite bean!! My current fav is the Yemen Bani Ismail and I got to say the Sidamo Guji isnt far off being quite similar to the Yemeni in its punch and flavour. Makes me wish I bought more of this bean or if anyone wants to part with theirs, let me know.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    48

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    Hi again, I have now roasted this again in my popper, to just into 2nd crack. The roast came out very uneven, but I cant remember if my 1st attempt did as well. Damn, Ive got to start keeping notes!!!!

    The roast is now 5 days old so a bit young compared to the 7-10 days recommended above and in other threads. *Anyhow, this roast smells sour or fermented in the container and the shots from Silvia have a similar taste. Its not overpowering in the cup, but at 5 days its definitely not my favorite bean. I will leave it now until 7 and 10 days for the next tasting. If I still dont like it I may try picking out some of the really lightly roasted beans and see if that helps.

    Im wondering if it may just be a few beans causing this rather than the whole batch??? Next time I roast it I will check the green beans closely and maybe discard any that look or smell suspect. Luckily, with popper sized roasts this is feasible!!! ;)

  8. #8
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    17,124

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    Gday "wannabesnob"....

    The flavours youre experiencing probably have more to do with using a Popper to roast them with, rather than anything to do with the beans, rest periods and what have you. Beans from this region tend to be small, hard and tough little buggers and as such really benefit from a roasting method that allows you to really control the profile such that you can reduce the temperature gradient towards Rolling First Crack (RFC) and then draw the roast out even more slowly towards the onset of Rolling Second Crack (RSC). Typical times for these events might be around 13-14 minutes for the former and another 6-7 minutes from there to the latter. As you can see, this is quite difficult to manage with an unmodified popper.

    Before you roast any more this way, it might pay to give some thought to patching together a Corretto or a Turbo-Oven/Stir Crazy style of roaster like "Koffee Kosmo" has done here... http://coffeesnobs.com.au/YaBB.pl?num=1228631426 . Lots of info to be found around the Forum on how to get a Corretto going so that shouldnt be any trouble. All the best mate :)

    Mal.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    48

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    Yes, Ive been studying both those alternative roasters keenly, but the financial controller is still in shock over what I paid for the PID Silvia! Ill have to slip into that later on I think. I tend to slightly favor the turbo oven over the Corretto, dunno why really :-/

    My only control over roasting speed at the moment is to pick a really cold morning!!! This morning was definitely not one of those! Still, I love the results of most of my roasts, so if the Sidamo Guji is not a bean I can handle with my popper, it sounds like lots of people love it so I can maybe do a swap with someone for a bean I can handle.

    And, thanks for the advice, any help is greatly appreciated.

  10. #10
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    17,124

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    Hi again "wannabe"....

    No need to sell the Sidamo on although there would be plenty of takers Im sure. So long as you keep them stored in the calico bags they came in, and then put them in an airy, clean, dry, and dark place (bottom of a pantry or similar for example) green beans can last for years. By then you will hopefully have knocked up a Corretto or TO/SC roaster 8-)

    Doesnt have to cost you much you know.... Ive seen BMs in our local Op-Shops for sale at $20-40 and if you already have a working heatgun then youre just about there for very little outlay. The TO/SC style might cost a little more initially but there are several members who have been using variations on this design for several years and theyre still going strong. In the end, you will be way in front, both in terms of coffee quality and freshness but also economically.... The latter benefit could be used as a justification argument to loosen up those purse strings a little ;).

    Anyway mate, hang on to those beans. Theyre really a very special little bean when roasted optimally. All the best,

    Mal.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    721

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    Im one of those takers if youre thinking of swapping your Sidamo Guji. I absolutely love them and they do roast unevenly but it doesnt seem to matter in the cup. They smell "different" though but for me i wouldnt describe it as fermented or sour. Pmd you about possible swap options...

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    9

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    Hmmm... so it isnt just me. I tried this in my popper and got a bit of a lighter roast than I am used to. It tasted OK but a bit odd. In hindsight I suppose I could almost have described it as tasting fermented.

    I tried it again recently, but roasting it nice and slow in my corretto (and a bit darker). This time I got nice a nice subtle berry aftertaste and what I guess I would describe as a chocolate flavour (excuse my descriptions - Im still trying to figure out what exactly I can taste in my roasts!).

    Of course I have been known to mess up the occassional roast for no good reason, so it may not have had all that much to do with the equipment!

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    48

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    OK, its now day 10. I missed day 7, maybe I was subconsciously dreading the taste.

    I cant believe the change in this coffee. On opening the bag, *the beans are now showing some glistens of oils on the exterior and more importantly, there was no longer the fermented smell. This was an exciting revelation! Now dread was replaced with curiosity and a cautious glimmer of hope. In the cup there is no longer a strong sour/fermented flavor just something I dont know how to describe apart from wild. Feral. Interesting. I guess its the same flavor but muted and now more like a fruity flavor finishing in a slightly bitter taste. Now its a very drinkable coffee though still not yet my favorite. Sumatra Blue Lintong currently holds that title but the Guji is a very interesting coffee which will be tempting me back for more. Ill set it aside now until day 15, if I can hold out that long!

    For the rest of my Guji greens, Ill wait for the coldest mornings and roast smaller batches to try to stretch out my roast time.

  14. #14
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    721

    Re: Ethiopia Sidamo Guji

    If the weather forecasts are to be believed, the coming Monday morning may be your Guji day.



Similar Threads

  1. Ethiopia Sidamo Guji
    By Oily in forum General Coffee Related...
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 5th June 2011, 09:06 AM
  2. Ethiopia Sidamo Guji
    By dailybean in forum Cup Tasting Room
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 5th April 2010, 04:51 PM
  3. Ethiopia sidamo guji
    By joe_tynan in forum Cup Tasting Room
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11th May 2009, 06:56 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •