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Thread: ethiopian varieties

  1. #1
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    ethiopian varieties

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Im curious if others have found Ethipian Kuza to be good but not as flavourful as Gambella, Harrar, or Yirgacheffe? Im wondering if perhaps Im not roasting the Kuza to maximum effect?

  2. #2
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    I was thinking the same thing last night. I havent tried Harrar or Yirg but I find the Gambella Naturals to be much more flavoursome than the Kuza. I have roasted the Kuza in my Gene to a few seconds into SC which is the same roast profile I use for Gambella Naturals.

  3. #3
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    thank you ajayro, I have a gene too and did the same thing. I like the smoothness of the Kuza, it just doesnt taste as amazing.

  4. #4
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    Only done one roast of the Kuza.
    but so far my thoughts are Harrar --> Gambella --> Kuza

    study yet to be completed.

  5. #5
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    I believe (from a lot of reading) that most home roasters who like to dabble in many forms of brewing the bean, tend to roast this bean a little lighter and brew via one of many manual methods.... Pour-over, filter, syphon, etc.

    Tends to bring out more of the varietal flavours of the bean than roasting to suit espresso brewing... 8-)

    Mal.

  6. #6
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    I have some Yirgacheffe , Gambella natral ,Gambella sun dried, and Kuza.
    I also roast with a Gene Cafe.
    The only bean im having real success with has been the
    June09 Yirgacheffe which i have now run out of , It was a diffrent flaver to the augast Yirgacheffe which i still have , the former had Huge florel sweetness to it but the later one came with a grapfruit flaver without the florel nose to it .
    Like the other people im not geting the big sweet berry fruity notes that others are describing and have tried at least 10 diffrent roasting profiles with the gambella sundried whithout sucess iv got about 2kg left and am keen to see how it goes in a diffrent Roaster .
    Im wondering if the style of roaster doesnt suit these beans. The flavers im geting are very light foamy and not very intersting at all . Im just about to have anouther go at the Gambeler Nat.

    Quote Originally Posted by 715C585459350 link=1259532730/4#4 date=1259679507
    Re: ethiopian varieties
    Reply #4 - Yesterday at 12:58am I believe (from a lot of reading) that most home roasters who like to dabble in many forms of brewing the bean, tend to roast this bean a little lighter and brew via one of many manual methods.... Pour-over, filter, syphon, etc.

    Tends to bring out more of the varietal flavours of the bean than roasting to suit espresso brewing...
    Are these beans geting any good results via larger rosters .5kg and up via larger drum roasting as an espresso?
    Im realy keen to try a nice fruty jam like espresso! :)

  7. #7
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    Quote Originally Posted by 52565C540E0B555E573F0 link=1259532730/5#5 date=1259831785
    Are these beans geting any good results via larger rosters .5kg and up via larger drum roasting as an espresso? * *
    Im realy keen to try a nice fruty *jam like *espresso! * *:)
    Cant speak for any other type of roaster but in my particular Corretto, I take them (750g green) into a lazy, regular Second Crack at around the 18 minute mark and then immediately cool, bag and seal.

    They are left for about 10 days in the sealed 1-Way Valve Bag, then opened. You are really bathed in a very fruity/berry/pinot aroma at that moment which carries through into the espresso and even made as a Doppio Piccolo, the fruitiness comes through in waves. Perhaps you need to experiment with your particular roast profile of these a bit more. Try small batches, ideally in a popper, where you can try batches of 80g or so roasted through a range of profiles, until you strike the one that does it for you.

    Youve gotta experiment to find the sweet spot for your palate.... ;)

    Mal.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Luke_G's Avatar
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    I never had a chance to try the Gambella naturals but have been through a few kilos of the Yirga and Harrar.

    I have to admit , i prefered the Lima over both of them though. There is something about its mellow citrus and smooth buttery finish i love :)

    In search of some more though as im down to my last 2kgs :(

  9. #9
    borat123
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    IMHO Limu moca is the pick of the Ethiopians. Smooth, full body, almost no acidity, sweet and so earthy you could just about chew on it.

    And now I dont have any left... :(

  10. #10
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    Quote Originally Posted by 26373E2B2A26212C2F3C3A4E0 link=1259532730/0#0 date=1259532730
    Im curious if others have found Ethipian Kuza to be good but not as flavourful as Gambella, Harrar, or Yirgacheffe? Im wondering if perhaps Im not roasting the Kuza to maximum effect?

    I see that all of the Kuza has gone. I havent had that one before and it would have been interesting to give it a go. Ive just ordered some of the Harrar and the Gambella - very happy to find some Harrar here because its my favourite. I had to give away my green bean stash when I left the UK and have been hankering after some for a while.

  11. #11
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    I have tried several varieties of green beans from bean bay (and have enjoyed them all!). However Im having trouble getting the Ethiopian Gambella beans too taste good. They always come out too sour. I roast them myself to the the same darkness as the other beans I have tried (fairly dark), and brew with the same method (stove top espresso). Is the sourness a characteristic of the bean or is there something Im missing???


  12. #12
    Senior Member Koffee_Kosmo's Avatar
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    Quote Originally Posted by 50536C74666F6F030 link=1259532730/10#10 date=1262067340
    I have tried several varieties of green beans from bean bay (and have enjoyed them all!). *However Im having trouble getting the Ethiopian Gambella beans too taste good. *They always come out too sour. *I roast them myself to the the same darkness as the other beans I have tried (fairly dark), and brew with the same method (stove top espresso). *Is the sourness a characteristic of the bean or is there something Im missing???
    Allow longer time to FC 13 to 15 min
    Allow longer time to SC 19 to 22 min
    Allow up to 14 days degas

    Rost dark cs9/10

    KK
    Gretsch likes this.

  13. #13
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    Thanks for the advice KK.

    Has come out much much nicer at the darker roasts.

    Im unsure what differences I should be expecting if I allow it to degas for a fortnight?? I read somewhere about issues related to gas when brewing with an espresso machine too soon after roasting, but Im only using a stove top espresso. Does gas cause issues for stove tops too?

  14. #14
    Sleep is overrated Thundergod's Avatar
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    Quote Originally Posted by 7D7E41594B42422E0 link=1259532730/12#12 date=1262236914
    Im unsure what differences I should be expecting if I allow it to degas for a fortnight??
    Some beans taste better after a longer rest.

  15. #15
    Senior Member GregWormald's Avatar
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    Ive just finished *:( one of the best--if not THE BEST--piccolo lattés Ive ever the ecstacy of consuming--Kuza.

    Roasted on the 7th to a CS 10 level, I tried it few days ago and it was nice--good flavour, mid body and with a nice aftertaste--very similar to the last two roasts. I saw that others had aged theirs longer than my batches usually last, so I just re-sealed the bag and went back to other coffees.

    Today it was very fruity, with a heavy floral perfume on the palate--like somebody had dumped flower essence in the cup--a heavy body, and a long, lingering aftertaste. It was more impressive than the best Limu, Harrar or Sidamo (my usual favourites). It actually made me exclaim out loud! YUM!!!!!!

    It must have been a god-shot! *:o

    (I had lychees like that once in Bali--the school kids climbed the trees outside their classroom and threw the fresh fruit down to us.)

    Oh boy, Im hoping that it is repeatable. (fingers WELL crossed)

    Greg

  16. #16
    hazchem
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    Quote Originally Posted by 794C5B5969514C535F525A3E0 link=1259532730/14#14 date=1263545867
    Kuza. Roasted on the 7th to a CS 10 level
    How did you roast it Greg? Set 230C until rolling first crack and then drop to 220C or something along those lines?

  17. #17
    Senior Member GregWormald's Avatar
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    Re: ethiopian varieties

    Quote Originally Posted by 424B5049424F472A0 link=1259532730/15#15 date=1263591463
    Quote Originally Posted by 794C5B5969514C535F525A3E0 link=1259532730/14#14 date=1263545867
    Kuza. Roasted on the 7th to a CS 10 level
    How did you roast it Greg? Set 230C until rolling first crack and then drop to 220C or something along those lines?
    Thats it. Here is what my notes say:
    7 Jan 10
    Set 230°, 300 grams.
    230° reached at 8.8 minutes in.
    1st--first snaps at 11.7 minutes, rolling 1st crack at 12.5 minutes--reduce set temp to 220° (The heat reduction usually takes me a minute or so to actually do--a couple of degrees at a time and I wait for the heater cycle once before the next reduction.)
    2nd--first snaps at 16.7 minutes.
    Cooling started at 17.5 minutes at commence of regular snapping.
    Cool in machine and bag immediately.

    Greg



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