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Thread: Qishr

  1. #1
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    Qishr

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Quishr/Qishr/eightmillionotherspellings is a tisane made by steeping coffee cherries in hot water. I recently read here that Qishr is available in dried form. I imagine that this sort of thing would be an absolute nightmare to get through customs, but I figure that if you dont ask, you dont get ;D

    Cheers,

    Luca

  2. #2
    Senior Member GregJW's Avatar
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    Re: Qishr

    I wondered what they did with all that coffee fruit (could it be called that? :-?).

    Looks interesting. A morning coffee juice before my morning coffee :o.

  3. #3
    Wine_of_the_Bean
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    Re: Qishr

    Next well be drinking spirits from the coffee cherries.

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    Mal Dimal's Avatar
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    Re: Qishr

    Quote Originally Posted by Wine_of_the_Bean link=1208867171/0#2 date=1208895490
    Next well be drinking spirits from the coffee cherries.
    Now THATs an idea 8-) ;)

    Mal.

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    Re: Qishr

    Im sure if we ask Inny he can get some done at Mt Top?

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    Re: Qishr

    I have been wanting to try this for ages but not been game to order any over from Sweet Marias.

    A local grower does seem a good solution.

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    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Wow, old thread. Started before my time.

    Anyway, bought some Qishr from Beanbay with my last order and decided to give it a try today.

    Four teaspoons in a tea pot with about 400ml of water heated to 90 degrees (variable temp kettle). Steeped for about 8 mins. Served in small cups. The result was a sweet, fruity brew with a flavour I can't adequately describe other than it was quite pleasant. Not at all coffee like. The flavour tended to improve as the brew cooled; the second pouring was nicer suggesting a fairly long brew time is required depending on your tastes.
    Now I've only tried it the once but it seemed to have a relaxing effect.

  8. #8
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    Old thead indeed.
    (I've just moved it from general to cup-tasting and maybe it won't be as buried!)

    At the time Luca posted this there was no way AQIS would allow Qishr into Australia, I tried a couple of times and kept hitting a brick-wall. Even 10 years later we still had a fair amount of grief with customs and they quarantined it for a couple of weeks while they thought about it. Luckily for us they didn't find any critters over the 2 weeks which was their main concern (fair enough too).

    The result was a sweet, fruity brew with a flavour I can't adequately describe
    Think fresh apricot skins initially and a finish of grandpa's pipe tobacco. I think that nails it.

    It is lovely, subtle, sweet, aromatic and all round enjoyable drink hot or cold. I even had a play with 300g in the cold drip and ran it through twice for a extra long and slow infusion. Produced 3 litres and put it in the fridge, t'was excellent ice-cold on a hot day and dissapeared over a couple of hot roast days.

    it seemed to have a relaxing effect.
    Maybe, I think most of the relaxing effect is the micro time-out you have waiting for it and the process of sharing from the pot. Paula and I do a pot of English Breakfast late every night, it's habit forming and without it, the night seems cut short.

    Enjoy!
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  9. #9
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy View Post
    Think fresh apricot skins initially and a finish of grandpa's pipe tobacco. I think that nails it.

    It is lovely, subtle, sweet, aromatic and all round enjoyable drink hot or cold.
    Yes, apricot now that you mentioned it. Pipe tobacco? Well yes, there is an aromatic quality but I'll defer to your well-trained taste buds. Many online articles mention that spices such as ginger and cinnamon are commonly used in a qishr mix so I was expecting there might be some of that too.

    Wonder how much regional difference there is. would qishr in, say, the Harrar region taste different to that made in another region.

    Anyway, my first taste has encouraged me to give it another go. I hope other CSers will too.
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    Hi guys,

    Wow, this thread takes me back ...

    So, it seems like in the decade plus since I made the initial comments, South and Central American coffee producers seem to have pushed selling this stuff and "Cascara" seems to be the accepted term for it. I've also had the opportunity to visit a few coffee farms and eat a bunch of coffee cherries. And it turns out that the flavour of Cascara seems to me to sort of be to fresh coffee cherries what the flavour of (unsulphured) apricots is to fresh apricots, if that makes sense to anyone.

    I got to make the pilgrimage to Boquete, Panama last year to visit a few great geisha producers, which was amazing. Boquete is a fairly small town and a bit of a delight to visit, particularly if you are interested in rainforests, hiking and such (I just hiked the volcano; too much time doing coffee stuff otherwise). The crazy thing is that when you walk past the cafes around town, they might be running a commercial business off a domestic Krups espresso machine ... but they will still have a roasted geisha coffee on offer. I don't have much experience visiting producing countries, but what little experience I do have suggests that most places export the best stuff and don't keep much for local consumption, so it was quite heartening to see them at least having a good crack at selling it locally. Anyway, none of the espresso based coffees that I had there really left a memory ... but the Cascara sure did ...

    So on the off chance that you ever find yourself sweating and pounding the pavement in the streets of boquete, make a beeline for Kotowa coffee and get yourself a "nitro" cascara, poured with a head reminiscent of a Guinness. This cascara tasted really fresh, as though the fruit hadn't been dried much. I guess the flavour is something like a semi-neutral, low flavoured, low sweetness longan or rambutan with maybe something heading towards cantaloupe or an apricot and maybe some suggestion of a strawberry or a raspberry. With some sweetness, but not overwhelming sweetness, and a tiny bit of acidity, it was incredibly refreshing. But, amazingly, if you close your eyes, click your heels and say "there's no place like boquete" three times in a row and strain all of your tasting muscles, you can convince yourself that you can taste in the drink the delicate and irresistible jasmine-like aroma of fresh coffee blossoms. Maybe I'm remembering it through cascara coloured glasses, but that's my story and I'm sticking with it!

    Luca
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  11. #11
    Senior Member flynnaus's Avatar
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    Thanks Luca
    As is usually the case, we learn something from your posts.
    However, be careful when ordering Cascara as it could also refer to a plant (Cascara sagrada) used for its laxative properties.

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    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
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    The Yemen Qishr in BeanBay at the moment came from the same Yemen Ismaili beans we landed (which is full-circle cool)

    When talking to Ahmed Ahmed in Yemen and he alternates between calling this Qishr and Cascara but as a rule Cascara refers to Central and South American crops and Qishr to ones around the Red Sea.

    ...I think the marketing might and better Internet connectivity of South America means their name will dominate at least until Starbucks starts selling as something trademarked.


    nitro cascara
    Cascara would work well and I expect is far better than nitro coffee which is typically "ummm, err, interesting" if you are being polite.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by flynnaus View Post
    Thanks Luca
    As is usually the case, we learn something from your posts.
    However, be careful when ordering Cascara as it could also refer to a plant (Cascara sagrada) used for its laxative properties.
    Hmm. Well that could explain a lot - I would highly recommend packing a standard travel medicine kit, including immodium or the like, when travelling to a producing country!

    Quote Originally Posted by Andy
    Cascara would work well and I expect is far better than nitro coffee which is typically "ummm, err, interesting" if you are being polite.
    Yes, I think it was much better than any nitro coffee I've had. In fact, I can only remember having a handful of cold coffees that were anywhere near drinkable. I guess CS members who have bought the Yemen Quishr could always brew some, chill it and run it through a soda siphon!
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