Results 1 to 17 of 17
Like Tree45Likes
  • 7 Post By greenman
  • 2 Post By Andy
  • 3 Post By DaveD
  • 3 Post By greenman
  • 1 Post By theonetruepath
  • 3 Post By DesigningByCoffee
  • 2 Post By Barry O'Speedwagon
  • 2 Post By 392392
  • 4 Post By DesigningByCoffee
  • 1 Post By barlo
  • 2 Post By Andy
  • 2 Post By robusto
  • 5 Post By Andy
  • 2 Post By robusto
  • 3 Post By Dimal
  • 3 Post By samuellaw178

Thread: Ethiopia Bensa Sagara

  1. #1
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    3,167

    Ethiopia Bensa Sagara

    Gene Cafe Coffee Roaster $850 - Free Beans Free Freight
    Roasted 300g of Bensa Sagara a few days ago, did a ten minute roast to a lively first crack and quickly cooled them for filter brewing.
    Greens had a fruity aroma and when unloading them from the cooler they a fragrant fruity aroma.
    Ran them through the Clever dripper today 30g to 400ml water and 1m30sec brew time.
    Very clean and sweet with velvety mouthfeel, lovely stonefruit flavours and a nice finish.
    You have done it again Andy!!
    Andy, coffeechris, dan77 and 4 others like this.

  2. #2
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Internet
    Posts
    17,218
    I'm loving this one too, I actually have a Brazen filter of it beside me at the moment.

    Smells amazing.
    Dimal and Javaphile like this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    West Footscray, Melbourne
    Posts
    214
    This is definitely another Ethiopian stunner - up there with the Sidamo Ardi and Biftu Gesha!
    Andy, greenman and Javaphile like this.

  4. #4
    Senior Member greenman's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    3,167
    Have been enjoying it as cold brew this week, the flavours really stand out!!
    Andy, Dimal and DaveD like this.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    96
    I learned about these Ethiopians with the Sidamo. I bought 5kg of that when it came out, now it's out of stock and may not make it back this season. I'm in danger of running out.

    So I bought 5kg of the Bensa Sagara based on Andy's write up and now I've worked my way through two 333g batches I bought 5kg more. It'll make a rather handy substitute as and when I run out of Sidamo.

    Now up to 52 varieties in the cupboard, totalling 103kg. That's about two year's supply so I'd better reign it in... yeah right. Until a new variety lands.
    Andy likes this.

  6. #6
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Millthorpe NSW
    Posts
    2,047
    Into some of these beauties. I did a relatively gentle ramping profile (for an Ethiopian) and dropped a little before second crack at around 215.5°. While I wasn't expecting the huge fruit I'm hearing about with this type of profile, I did get a creamy, thick body (almost like the latest batch of Waghi!) and a lovely smooth choc bomb in the cup, but without any hint of the baking I'd expect from a slower roasted Harrar. So I'm thinking it's like a combo of and early-peaking Yemen and some Gambella without the fruit-cake! Great bean for a true Mocha Java explosion

    Next time I'll try to explore a faster roast and lighter drop…
    Andy, Dimal and flashpixx like this.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Barry O'Speedwagon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    PRL
    Posts
    2,722
    I just roasted it at 100% from start, dropped to 50% at first crack and 25% at rolling first crack, dropped it about 20 seconds short of second crack. Makes a great flat white. Bought some more. I'm heading overseas in a few weeks, might take a few bags with me to go in the Flair.
    Andy and Dimal like this.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    VIC
    Posts
    52
    Anyone having this as an espresso?

    I find myself using high ratios and longer brew times to balance the acid to sweetness,

    Really liking this one!
    Dimal and noonar like this.

  9. #9
    Life-long Learner DesigningByCoffee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Millthorpe NSW
    Posts
    2,047
    Quote Originally Posted by 392392 View Post
    Anyone having this as an espresso?

    I find myself using high ratios and longer brew times to balance the acid to sweetness,

    Really liking this one!
    I ended up doing a faster roast of this bean (well, faster than the one I roasted earlier!) and certainly found it now had lots of lovely sweet, fruity acidity as espresso. I always use pretty slow pours anyway, and they certainly responded well to this bean. Not quite Yirg-like citrus flavours, but more stone fruit. And makes a lovely milk based brew too!
    dan77, Dimal, greenman and 1 others like this.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    29
    After reading these posts I tried some Bensa Sagara roasted by Andy. My palate is lets say, 'still learning the nuances of flavour' so my descriptions are quite simple but I know something I like when I taste it.

    This bean I really enjoyed. I tried it as cold brew but mostly I drank it as an Aeropress brew. The overwhelming flavour (and smell when griding) I notices was blueberries. Delicious!
    Dimal likes this.

  11. #11
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Internet
    Posts
    17,218
    Glad you liked my roast!

    It smells like a bag of mixed lollies when you crack the bag open, sweet, fruity, berries. It's a real experience and the perfect thing to give someone who says "coffee tastes like coffee".

    Enjoy!
    Dimal and barlo like this.

  12. #12
    Senior Member robusto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3,051
    Unless people here mention what roasting equipment they are using, the description of the roast, including times, are not helpful at all. At least to me.
    Dimal and Yelta like this.

  13. #13
    CoffeeSnobs Owner Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Internet
    Posts
    17,218
    Quote Originally Posted by robusto View Post
    Unless people here mention what roasting equipment they are using, the description of the roast, including times, are not helpful at all. At least to me.
    I disagree, while you might think that specific and technical data will help it's actually more likely to drive you insane chasing someone else's setup, environmental conditions, brew methods and importantly tastes!

    Many of the posts in this thread describe shorter and faster roasts and for my taste that how I did it too but the real reason that you home roast is to do something that tastes good to you.

    Use your own "known good" method on any new bean then Goldilocks it by doing one lighter and one darker and see where your tastes prefer. You can then tinker around that roast to perfect it.

    There is no "correct answer" , just what you like.

    This bean is one of those that works well through a wide range of roast depths and many different brew methods.
    Dimal, greenman, Yelta and 2 others like this.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Yelta's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Moonta SA.
    Posts
    7,237
    Quote Originally Posted by robusto View Post
    Unless people here mention what roasting equipment they are using, the description of the roast, including times, are not helpful at all. At least to me.
    Very true, for the few that bother to fill out a profile it would be a good idea to provide details of your roasting setup, I've just amended mine, only thing not there are times, obviously this varies with weather, type of beans and the type of roast your aiming for.

    PS Just read Andy's comments, valid points.

  15. #15
    Senior Member robusto's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    3,051
    Andy, Yes, it is all about what works for someone.

    But also I would have thought that one of the reasons we are all here is to share our experience, learn from one another.

    I have certainly learned from others' experience with a Behmor, for instance.

    But even leaving learning aside, I find it impossible to visualise that the poster is writing about if I don't know what equipment he/she is using.

    Why mention that it took so many minutes to first crack, then dropped the temperature so much till second --- if they are the only one meant to
    benefit from that method on whatever equipment they are using?
    Dimal and Yelta like this.

  16. #16
    Mal Dimal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Warwick, QLD
    Posts
    17,395
    I guess if we know the equipment being used, one or more CSers should be able to help a newbie get within a bull's roar of something that will taste reasonable in the cup. That's what I try to do anyway and then Andy's recommendations above will ensure that the newbie roaster can hone in on, what they really love in the cup...

    Mal.
    greenman, robusto and Yelta like this.

  17. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    371
    Just sharing my experience in case anyone else is having the same issue...I have been struggling with the Bensa for a while, as I couldn't get a satisfactory roast and didn't get what the raves were about.

    My Bensa roasts always had this bready/grainy aroma to it. That is until I finally decided to pick out the pale-looking beans (and some other weird looking beans). What a huge difference! I am not sure why my experience is so different from the others - perhaps I was really unlucky and got a bag with more defects than average (?), but mine was definitely not enjoyable until I started doing this.

    Give this a try if you're experiencing the same: pick out the pale/defect beans after roasting and set them aside. Then try smelling/brewing the sorted beans and the culled pale-beans side by side. For me, the aromas are day-and-night and they smell like two completely different beans (the pale beans smell really really really bready/grainy). I went a bit overboard and checked them bean-by-bean, and picked out about 10% (way overkill I know, if in doubt, cull!). But the result was well worth it. The grainy aroma is no longer there to overwhelm the fruitiness in the coffee. I can see why this was a winner!
    Dimal, barlo and 392392 like this.



Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •