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What determines post roast longevity?

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  • What determines post roast longevity?

    I recently bought 1kg of freshly roasted beans online from a well known Melbourne based roaster. I usually buy 500g at a time (as I drink 500g/fortnight), however to make it cost effective I bought a kg as this particular blend is $60/kg. I assumed that into the tail end of my supply the coffee would start to go downhill. However I am well past the 3 week mark post roast and the coffee is still going strong. From my previous experience most beans I have tried seem to go downhill after 2 weeks.

    I vaguely remember Andy (Freeman) commenting about espress WOW going strong even as long as 5-6 weeks and also remember Chris (Talk Coffee) having a special version of his Urban blend which I think peaked later as well.

    Just interested, what, if anything determines how long a particular blend of coffee stays good post roast. Apart from the obvious things ie storage technique.

  • #2
    Re: What determines post roast longevity?

    For a start beans reach their peaks at different points without factoring in roast style, depth etc.

    From my buying/roasting/drinking generally lighter roasts peak earlier and go downhill faster after that. Vague I know but I have 30+ varietals in my current stash so I am avoiding specifics :

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    • #3
      Re: What determines post roast longevity?

      Different roast styles create more or less CO2. Ive had some coffees peak at day 15 post roast and be good all the way to day 30.

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      • #4
        Re: What determines post roast longevity?

        Originally posted by 476563787F7563100 link=1285200774/2#2 date=1285257786
        Different roast styles create more or less CO2. Ive had some coffees peak at day 15 post roast and be good all the way to day 30.
        Yep,

        Me too with several different bean varieties.... Trouble is, what we may consider to be wonderful may taste unpalatable to someone else. I know that some of my favourite beans, my younger son just wont have a bar of. Were a weird bunch.... :P

        Mal.

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        • #5
          Re: What determines post roast longevity?

          Hey all,

          Given the number of threads on bean storage, I thought Id hack this question on at the end of this thread.

          With regard to post-roast longevity, Im just wondering about the difference between valved and non-valved bags. Ive bought coffee off a few reputable roasters who sell their freshly roasted coffee in plain detpak paper bags, those ones that fold shut. Is there much difference between them and the use of foil bags with valves?

          Ill be honest, I havent noticed any considerable decrease in quality of the beans, however, Im finishing most within 2-3 weeks of roasting?

          Cheers

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          • #6
            Re: What determines post roast longevity?

            As long as you are opening the bag 2-3 times per day, then I cant see the bag itself making much difference as to the beans exposure to oxygen.

            For the degassing stage though (the first week or so after roasting) the mylar one-way valve bags should be much more oxygen-proof.

            Greg

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            • #7
              Re: What determines post roast longevity?

              I had this conversation with my roaster and he told me that by chopping the flame at first crack and coasting to second crack you are able to extend the roast profile, which in turn increases the ageing potential of the beans - which I guess makes sense s in theory this could translate to a slower release of CO2 ?

              I reckon it was also depend A LOT on the particular beans that you use - some SOs that I work with for instance drink well after only 4 days post roast, whilst others need at least 11 days on them before theyre even approachable!

              One Columbian bean in particular tastes faulty and incomplete when young, but give it ten days plus - and even 3 weeks plus - and its a whole different ball game!

              I notice too a quite pronounced colour change in the espresso coffee when its got a bit of age on it, and this both comes up lovely in the cup, as well as helping to build texture and hold body when added with milk

              If it was up to me I wouldnt serve any coffees less than two weeks old - but necessity dictates that some coffee is always going to be consumed young, which is why it is good to run with a number of different blends / SOs which appreciate both early and relatively late post roast that is

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