Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Chemicals in coffee

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Chemicals in coffee

    http://recipefinder.ninemsn.com.au/video.aspx?videoid=11df9cd8-ec35-4700-b1cb-85c459dc52d7&tab=2

    http://www.foodstandards.gov.au/_srcfiles/Survey%20of%20chemical%20contaminants%20and%20resi dues%20in%20coffee1.pdf

    What confused me in this video was the flat whites and lattes had different amounts of chemicals found in them. WTF? This makes no sense. Any one keen to offer some sort of explanation as to why this may be the case.

    The research being referred to is the second link in this post (PDF).

    I havent had a look at the PDF yet.


  • #2
    Re: Chemicals in coffee

    I believe that if you were to look at the stats for significant differences then you would find no difference between the coffees. Also the sample size was so small that you wouldnt be able to draw many conclusions anyway. All you can draw (IMHO) from this is that these chemicals are present and you will find them all over the world.

    Brett

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Chemicals in coffee

      Consider that it may be due to pollution.  Stuff being in other stuff its not supposed to be in because its dug up and turned into stuff, with other stuff dumped or otherwise emitted - entering the water cycle through rivers or dumps, etc.

      All pretty par for the course if you ask me. Meaning if we had simpler ways of living and using the resources around us, the impact on the environment would be somewhat lessoned and I would argue that pollution would be lessened too.

      As far as I know manganese/aluminium is not as toxic as it would first appear in small quantity and is potentially beneficial to some degree.

      The boiler and that pipe that carry it from the reservoir to your house may also have a bit to do with some of the trace elements too.

      Fluoride and Chlorides in water dont particularly help either.  Whats particularly amusing is they dont even mention them.  Thats in there deliberately in most places and is usually listed/reasoned as a preservative - both of them are known to have detrimental effect.  Wonder about that instead :P

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Chemicals in coffee

        They probably got the flat whites from one place and lattes from another.

        and to heck with proper scientific testing :

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Chemicals in coffee

          Two separate types of pollutants, the ones that come in milk - from all sorts of nice growth chemicals and chemicals to increase milk production etc. and water of which I have mentioned.

          It would actually be interesting to see a chemical test of the different types of milk - including drug tests.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Chemicals in coffee

            Coffee (generally) is a very heavily effected argri crop, massive amounts of pesticides, herbicides and artificial fertilisers are used during growth production. Just like most of our food sources really (ex organic of course). There is no surprise that there are many chemical residues in coffee. But.........who cares!! Its delicious!!!! ;D

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Chemicals in coffee

              Oooh...chemicals in milk...a topic that is close to the heart strings here for we milk producers. Our milk is stringently tested. Of particular concern to us is the dry cow for our "mummies to be" (antibiotics). There is a withholding period that is mandatory for any chemical product/s used on/in a lactating cow or cows in general. That is carefully monitored by both the farmers and the milk factories, as drinkers with allergies etc can become ill or even worse. Who wants a court case or a fine on their hands? Not us. And this does happen we can tell you of such cases in our region. Fine or a jail term. So loving care is taken to see that we produce the best milk possible. We are audited very thoroughly in milk care programs. And we are proud to say we have a sign on our front gate to that effect "Premium Quality Milk". Yes the laboratories test every load of our milk. We do not get away with a thing. We know exactly what is in every load. It starts with the tanker driver taking the first sample from the vat. Just get a note or phone call to pull the plug on the vat if that days milk does not meet the stringent tests and down the drain it goes (very rarely) . Negative income for that day so one is most careful. Chemicals in milk. Not our doing. Over the last 10 years with the drought and lack of income..being well in the red.. our milk was very organically produced. It is not just a case of put the machines on the cows and send the milk off for processing. It is a real business that must be carfully monitored and managed to meet strict guidelines. We have been drinking raw milk for 40+ years and we are still here and fit and well. Our medical blood tests have always been excellent. Enjoy those coffees. Life is too short. Play hard.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Chemicals in coffee

                LOL, what a nice waste of coffee and research materials. Without any controls being put in place, and no statistical analysis of the results being represented, those graphs really are nothing more than a set of pretty pictures.

                I know its a bit harsh, but I wouldnt even waste my time trying to draw inferences from the data presented  


                Fil

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Chemicals in coffee

                  Originally posted by 5C5146565D51340 link=1292865343/6#6 date=1292894709
                  Chemicals in milk.
                  Not suggesting you didnt mean it in this manner but thats what I find amusing by people obsessing over chemicals in stuff.  Sure, some are quite toxic. But when all is said and done the body has hundreds(?) of different chemicals it needs and/or produces for itself and we dont obsess about those - except when there are too much or few of them - or when they mess with our minds or perception :P

                  There are seemingly many producers that do not care as much about what comes out however as long as its within legal limits.  And they definitely should not get the blame for the undue pollution that happens elsewhere.

                  I will say though that regardless of how careful you try to be about production the reason why trace a varied amount of minerals/compounds end up in things like water and food producing plants and animals is largely due to pollution & volcanoes.

                  Pasteurisation is also a touchy subject as there is the suggestion that some enzymes and compounds are rendered less effective by the process. Some opinion about that would be interesting too. Its better than sterilisation though :P

                  Fil, you can be pretty sure about pollution and volcanoes though - soil naturally has trace elements to some degree too :P

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Chemicals in coffee

                    Originally posted by 5D44405744250 link=1292865343/8#8 date=1292898527
                    Fil, you can be pretty sure about pollution and volcanoes though - soil naturally has trace elements to some degree too  
                    Sorry John, I was not arguing the point about these chemicals/metals being present in coffee, soil, pollution, air etc. Damn internet and not getting my point across correctly ;D

                    My post was actually in the relation to the original question posed by the OP in regards to the perceived differences between what are essentially the same item. Based on the research and data presented in the attached PDF document (which shows a complete disregard for proper scientific methodology/investigation), the differences reported between the various types of coffee dont really signify anything.

                    Well, except perhaps that the researchers are desperately trying to grab some public exposure - could it grant writing time already?

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X